why carbon arrows and not aluminum?

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by Kansasbuck, Nov 28, 2013.

  1. Muzzy Man

    Muzzy Man Grizzled Veteran

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    15 GPI shaft would put me @ 450... plus another 50 or so for inserts/vanes etc.. add broadheads of 125-150 range for a total of around 625-650 total weight. That should be a sweet shooting arrow. I also would like to go back to shooting fingers... It's just less cumbersome but as we all know... bow manufacturers have moved on from that mindset... except for the Hoyt Tribute. That is why I shoot what I have... I am pretty accurate but it's not as fun to me.

    We have totally hijacked this thread... sorry op:hijacked:
     
  2. CoveyMaster

    CoveyMaster Grizzled Veteran

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    Ahh yeah, that was the other option I hinted at but didn't think you'd go that heavy....but, I know in one of the other threads someone here was talking about shooting finished arrows in that weight and beyond.

    I can certainly understand the appeal to going back to finger shooting, traditional archery or total instinctive shooting. I used all the above when I was a young'n at some point or another. Sometimes just because all I had was passed down equipment and couldn't afford new stuff of my own but I got by.

    I've been thinking a lot lately about getting a traditional recurve rig. There's deffinitely something romantic about the traditional setup that's just unbeatable. I'll never leave my fancy smancy compounds but it would be neat to shoot traditional and fingers again for fun.
     
  3. Kansasbuck

    Kansasbuck Weekend Warrior

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    This was a serious question. Looks like the only benefit is that they are more forgiving when target shooting. when you can get aluminum for $50/dz on sale, I can afford to bend a few if that's the only benefit.

    I too have reused pass through aluminum arrows.

    Carbons seem to be great to get more speed, but here I read often that guys keep adding weight to them, thus seems like staying with heavier aluminum is still the way to go. I could care less about my arrow speed, penetration on deer is my biggest concern, and I believe the broadhead makes more difference than the material the arrow is made of.

    Thanks to all that responded.
     
  4. Muzzy Man

    Muzzy Man Grizzled Veteran

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    Good luck... XX75 or XX78s are great shafts... just avoid the Superlites.
     
  5. jody5252

    jody5252 Weekend Warrior

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    kansasbuck. just shoot what you like and/or shoots best from "your" bow! Easton alum. arrows are excellent arrows, period. if you want to compromise you can get an a/c/c type shaft (alum. and carbon) p.s. how in the heck did this question lead up to finger shooting and recurve bows?? the man asked a simple question.
     
  6. Muzzy Man

    Muzzy Man Grizzled Veteran

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    There are no simple answers around here, just great questions that spawn discussions. We poke fun at one another, and we share our experience and experiences. I usually learn as much from the side bars as from the original questions. I think you will find this to be true too.
     
  7. Diamond Outlaw

    Diamond Outlaw Weekend Warrior

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    All I shoot is carbon arrows!

    I hate aluminum arrows because they can get bent. . Plus, a carbon arrow is much faster!

    To the OP: You need to ''FLEX'' carbon arrows to make sure they're not damaged, even on new arrows!

    If you don't know much about carbon arrows, Please read this link from my local pro-shop!

    Arrow Safety Warning - Hunter's Friend

    Click on the YouTube video so the video will be larger.
     
  8. Kansasbuck

    Kansasbuck Weekend Warrior

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    are there other benefits other than speed and aluminum bends where carbon doesn't?
     
  9. CoveyMaster

    CoveyMaster Grizzled Veteran

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    Faster arrow stability, more dynamic spine, straighter shafts (reliably straight), better transfer of energy equalling better penetration.
     
  10. TEmbry

    TEmbry Grizzled Veteran

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    I don't like choosing so I went with both. I shoot Easton FMJs. Best arrow made IMO. Narrow diameter, stiffness of carbons with the reliability/durability of aluminum on the outside. My finished 29" arrows come in right at 500 grains and absolutely rock the target compared to the carbons I shot previously (made the switch like 6 years ago and just bought 3 dozen shafts for half off to stock up for another 5-6 years.
     
  11. tfox

    tfox Grizzled Veteran

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    Xx78 Aluminum is straighter with better tolerances and more consistent spine in general.

    Nothing wrong with a good thick walled aluminum shaft. I prefer xx78 as they are made from better aluminum and are tougher.

    As for carbon being faster, mine aren't. Of course I've added 75 gr brass inserts and 150 gr broadheads for 500 gr arrows.:p


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    Last edited: Dec 11, 2013
  12. CoveyMaster

    CoveyMaster Grizzled Veteran

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    That's in a perfectly new world....They may come off the line straighter with a tighter tolerance but I guarantee you by the time they ship and get handled (in most circumstances) they aren't going to be that way by the time they are shot and even if they are they won't be after being practiced with in comparison to a carbon shaft....that's why I said "reliably".

    They aren't faster than what? What are you comparing them to? I'm talking a comparison between arrows with the same spine and same length. If a person is adept enough to weight both the same with inserts..yeah they will probably shoot about the same speed. The difference is the carbon has a stiffer spine with a smaller diameter and weight (if chosen based on gpi and spine strength)...right? Or am I all wrong again?....
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2013
  13. tfox

    tfox Grizzled Veteran

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    Still not true. Aluminum will bend when they strike a solid object or have side torque applied but you are blowing it out of proportion.

    They will be straight when you receive them and use them under normal circumstances. They will not bend on their own or hitting your target.

    Many still use them for indoor target archery.

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  14. CoveyMaster

    CoveyMaster Grizzled Veteran

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    No, they won't bend on their own...I didn't mean to insinuate they would. I meant that they are more likely to get messed up and be out of spec from shipping and handling fro mthe mfg to the shooter than a carbon shaft.

    I still disagree about blowing it out of proportion...I've never shot any aluminum shaft that was right after practicing with it out of a bow with 70# draw weight.....but whatever....maybe they are better since the last ones I used back in the late 80's early 90's.
     
  15. tfox

    tfox Grizzled Veteran

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    I think you used thinned walled xx75. They are soft and will bend easily. I am speaking of thick walled xx78.

    I need to spin check some of my old aluminums. I bet they are fine.

    In general, I agree, carbon are way stronger and the main reason I use them as well.

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  16. tfox

    tfox Grizzled Veteran

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    I think Arthur is subliminaly speaking through me. Talk about scary. :what:

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  17. CoveyMaster

    CoveyMaster Grizzled Veteran

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    Yes, I expect I was using the XX75's as well. Back in the day I was using whatever was readily available and cheap...at that time especially, carbons offered the best in that combination of available and cheap in a durable shaft. My target was also hard foam and just pulling the shafts out was a risk. The Carbons I could pull them out without a lot of fear of damaging them with a permanent bend.
    I don't know anything about shafts that are both aluminum and carbon or the newer ones made of newer alloys.
     
  18. SharpEyeSam

    SharpEyeSam Legendary Woodsman

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    What he said X1000! FMJ arrows RULE!!!
     
  19. Muzzy Man

    Muzzy Man Grizzled Veteran

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    You can bet, once you get past all the smoke, the reason carbons have become the prominent shaft is because they can be produced more cheaply and sold for more $$$$... bottom line... follow the money trail and you'll have the answer. $$$$s dictate trends regardless of what claims are made otherwise. Quite simply carbon manufacturers did a better job advertising than Easton.
     
  20. CoveyMaster

    CoveyMaster Grizzled Veteran

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    Respectfully disagree, they became prominant because they are more reliable and durable, the same reason Cabon fiber has taken over the role of high usage from aluminum by aviation and nearly every other industry. I thought Easton was a carbon shaft MFG?
     

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