Where does long distance begin?

Discussion in 'Bowhunting Talk' started by BB4tw, May 4, 2016.

  1. BB4tw

    BB4tw Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Specifically where practice for hunting is concerned.

    At what point is a shot considered long distance? Is 40 yards and out long distance shooting? Maybe the term doesn't apply until you get 60 yards away.

    I guess it's mostly opinion but target archery and 3d rules can add some context.

    What do you consider to be a minimum distance that can still be considered long distance?
     
  2. copperhead

    copperhead Grizzled Veteran

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    My opinion is its determined by the skill set of the shooter and terrain. For example anything much beyond 40 yards here in the southeast is hard unless on a field. In the woods the vertical clearance can be an issue. Out west however that number my go to say 60.

    So for me anything beyond 40 is long distance also maybe for a traditionalist anything beyond 20 is long distance.
     
  3. BB4tw

    BB4tw Die Hard Bowhunter

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    The point of long distance being different between compound and trad is a good one. I hadn't thought of that particular angle.
     
  4. indynotch50

    indynotch50 Grizzled Veteran

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    50 yards. If you're in the 40s that not too bad. I think over 50 you're starting to get out there.
     
  5. cantexian

    cantexian Grizzled Veteran

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    Based upon the skill of the hunter, and the setting of the shot: location, terrain, elevation, density of cover, the species and size of animal. It varies every time. "Long Distance" will be determine more so by how well prepared the individual hunter is for the specific shot. I would be comfortable with a 60 yard broadside shot on an elk out west. But in Arkansas, I am not shooting past 40, cover is too thick and the target too small.
     
  6. elkguide

    elkguide Grizzled Veteran

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    Anything farther than what I shoot.
     
  7. ybohunt

    ybohunt Die Hard Bowhunter

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    For me long distance starts at about 50.

    However everybody has a different skill set.For example a tournament archer might consider 50 to be an easy shot while a beginning archer would think of 50 yards as way out there.

    And then there are the guys who regularly shoot at 100+ yards and may not consider long distance to start until 80 yards.
     
  8. maxpetros

    maxpetros Grizzled Veteran

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    I regularly shoot 100+ yards. I would consider long distance on a whitetail to be 50 yards and 80 out west for large game like elk.


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  9. BB4tw

    BB4tw Die Hard Bowhunter

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    For me, long distance begins at 40 yards. Not because that's where it starts to get hard to shoot but because of the time the arrow spends in the air. It seems that 40 is where small details or inconsistencies in form and equipment start to make themselves known.

    For example, if you shoot a group that includes one arrow that is 25 grains heavier than the rest. It probably won't be noticeable until you get back around 40 yards.

    40 or longer is a long shot whether shooting at an animal or target. The specifics of said animal/target will determine if I will take a long shot or not.
     
  10. early in

    early in Grizzled Veteran

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    Long distance shooting begins where I stop shooting, at 30yrds. lol
     
  11. maxpetros

    maxpetros Grizzled Veteran

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    I don't think you can make an over arching statement about 40 being long for animals and target as there are many archers who's skills far surpass that.
    Edit: didn't realize at the end you were talking about your personal thoughts. Thought you meant in general
     
  12. Warren p

    Warren p Weekend Warrior

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    I do most of My practicing at 120 yards because it makes the close shot's seem easy. I would never shoot at a animal that far away unless it was wounded already. I think around 60 is getting into the long distance area, but I prefer them much closer! I have taken one elk and two deer at 70 but the conditions were perfect.
     
  13. Cooter/MN

    Cooter/MN Grizzled Veteran

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    Me too.
     
  14. JDUB

    JDUB Weekend Warrior

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    For me I'd say 60 and beyond...As much as I hate to admit most of my early bowhunting career I would just practice at 20 yards for a week before the season and then go out and try to kill deer. Not the best strategy I realize, then I wised up. I started practicing at 40 yards. I still pretty much only shoot 40 yards for the majority of my practice just because I have my target conveniently placed 40 yards from the door on the back of my garage. 40 has become the new 20, and now 60 is my new 40. Do this for a while and then you step up to 20-30 and you can smack arrows together no problem.
     
  15. Bryan Jeffrey

    Bryan Jeffrey Weekend Warrior

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    Equipment yes. but i would disagree about the form. new archers struggle at even 20 yards to have nice groups. archers that shoot at long distance might not notice what they perceive as minor inconsistencies tell 60 yards.
    ----
    It al depends on how well you shoot at what range. long distance shots are what you consider long distance. 30 yards or 130 yards. if it challenges you then its long distance
     
  16. bowhunter448

    bowhunter448 Grizzled Veteran

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    For shooting in the yard, I like to try and shoot out to 70 - 80. For hunting, it's gotten to be further out. Last year, I was comfortable out to 50 yards. This year, I'm hoping to get comfortable out to 60, but hope to fill my tag closer than that.
     
  17. Fitz

    Fitz Legendary Woodsman

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    Depends on what I'm shooting at. 25 yards is a long shot for me if I'm shooting at a red squirrel. 80 is long if I'm shooting at my big Rinehart bag.
     
  18. Innovative Outdoorsman

    Innovative Outdoorsman Weekend Warrior

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    Im with you. It depends if you are an out west hunter or a midwest whitetail hunter. The out west guy kills at 50 and 60 years and thinks nothing of it and the midwest treestand guy kills at 25 and thinks thats a stretch. Its all based on your ability. If you cant hit the mark at 30 yards, then 30 yards is long distance.

    As we develop a new type of fletching we are stretching the distance for evaluation purposes. That means shooting at distances from 10 to 100 yards and filming the flight and trying to improve it. Shooting at 90 yeards is one thing. Grouping at 90 yards is quite another.

    Here are some of our 70 thru 90 yards shots.



     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 15, 2017
  19. Oldcarp

    Oldcarp Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I live out west so most my hunting has been here. I have had a couple opportunities to hunt in the Midwest. Out west here its not unusual to have hunters shoot 60 yards. My personal max is 50 yards. But I do have a 60 yard pin which I do practice at. I just dont feel comfortable shooting a animal at 60 yards. Most my bow hunting is for elk and out of the elk I have shot I only have two that were over 30 yards. One was 51 yards and the other 32 yards. In elk camp we have one gentleman that shoots traditional and his max is 25 yards. So like most have said it depends on your skill and your equipment. With that being said I have helped a few people track elk that they have shot at 70 to 80 yards. I wouldn't suggest elk at that range because of the penetration factor. But that is my opinion.
     
  20. maxpetros

    maxpetros Grizzled Veteran

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    On the topic of long range shooting: recent pics from 100 and 115[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]


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