Whats the Cwd status this year.

Discussion in '2013 Bowhunting.com Deer Contest' started by KyleLewis, Jul 8, 2013.

  1. KyleLewis

    KyleLewis Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Last year CWD spoiled a lot of deer, anyone have any good news? Last year it was hard for people in the CWD zones to get points on the board.
     
  2. Justin

    Justin Administrator

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    I think you mean EHD, not CWD.

    So far we've had a very wet spring/early Summer so to the best of my knowledge EHD is a non-factor right now. Of course a lot of herds will take a few years to bounce back fully but it's a step in the right direction anyways.
     
  3. KyleLewis

    KyleLewis Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Yeah, oh ok so so is that "blue tongue"? I thought BT and chronic wasting disease were similar. Better google that up. Lol
     
  4. Justin

    Justin Administrator

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    EHD is commonly referred to as blue tongue, but they're not exactly the same thing. Close, but not quite. CWD is something totally separate. Once a deer is infected with it the disease (CWD) is fatal, but can take years to kill them. Once a deer starts showing signs of EHD or blue tongue they're generally dead within a day or two.

    EHD typically occurs during drought conditions as biting midges which carry the disease thrive in stagnant water. They fly up the deer's nostrils as they are drinking from stagnant ponds and pools of water, which is how they get the disease. It causes them to run a very high fever, which is why they are typically found in or around water.

    CWD is caused by a prion which infects the animal and over the course of time causes weight loss and eventual disorientation and death. While it is becoming increasingly prevalent in a lot of areas around the US at this time it doesn't appear to be having a major effect on the overall population of deer in these areas. Unlike EHD which can wipe out the vast majority of animals in a specific area if the outbreak is bad enough.

    With last year's drought EHD was a major problem all across the US, which hurt populations in a lot of areas. Eventually they should bounce back, but it may take them a few years.
     
  5. Fuzz_27

    Fuzz_27 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Thanks for the lesson Justin! I never knew the midges went up their noses i always thought it was like west nile with humans, gotta get bit to get it.
     
  6. SWitchBacKXT

    SWitchBacKXT Grizzled Veteran

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    Good read Justin!
     
  7. drath

    drath Weekend Warrior

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  8. frenchbritt123

    frenchbritt123 Grizzled Veteran

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    Justin is spot on. I would just add: EHD/Blue Tongue is not always fatal. The positive attribute to this disease is that if it does not affect or kill the deer that these genes can be passed on to the fawns. The stagnant water is present, but the mud from the water declining is what allows mass production of the insects.
    The prions that contribute to CWD are found in the soil. Once the soil is contaminated it is nearly impossible to get rid of the prions.
    If I was purchasing hunting property in a CWD zone I would research and keep this in mind. A correlation between CWD and fair market value could be made. If your skeptical, how about Asian Carp and recreational property?
     
  9. in da woods

    in da woods Grizzled Veteran

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    ah, the CWD is over rated. We have it here in lower Wisconsin. It freaked everyone out the first year it was announced, now back to norm. Prices for land do only one thing, go up.
     
  10. jlbmarine

    jlbmarine Weekend Warrior

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    No CWD in Ohio
     
  11. Justin

    Justin Administrator

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    I took a ride around a local "petting zoo" area last night that was hit hard by EHD last year. For the amount of driving I did in years past I would have seen 40+ deer including a couple bruiser bucks. I saw about a dozen total deer last night and the only bucks were a pair of 1 1/2's and a 2 1/2 year old 8 point. The rest were does, most with no fawns. EHD and the drought definitely put a damper on the population in some areas, that's for sure.
     
  12. Umpire Jim

    Umpire Jim Weekend Warrior

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    No sign of CDW here in northeast Ohio.
     
  13. LegendaryMe

    LegendaryMe Newb

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    Very interesting! Don't think we've had it here in west ky in awhile.
     

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