What's the best way to ask for permission?

Discussion in 'Bowhunting Talk' started by CToutdoorsman, Dec 3, 2016.

  1. CToutdoorsman

    CToutdoorsman Die Hard Bowhunter

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    So i was looking a town records and saw a property that has about 80 hunt-able acres on it and was just wondering what was every bodies best way to ask for permission to hunt. The big reason i ask is i don't know the land owner at all and am completely willing to share venison with them or do work around the property but wanted to know how to approach it.
    Thanks!
     
  2. trial153

    trial153 Grizzled Veteran

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    Knock on the door and ask.
     
  3. Bowman92

    Bowman92 Weekend Warrior

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  4. Me53

    Me53 Weekend Warrior

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    I generally pick out a few places each year to try. One of my kids and I will knock on doors and ask for permission to shed hunt (or spring turkey hunt) as an icebreaker. People seem more inclined to allow these activities freely. Then I stop by a couple of time during the spring/summer to chat and offer labor to the landowner. If I get permission to deer hunt great...if not, I usually get turkey permission and a referral to a friend of theirs who might allow me to deer hunt.

    As most of the places are fairly close to my house, I value creating a relationship with the landowner.

    A kid can be a great icebreaker the first time you introduce yourself. However, two kids seem to be more of a distraction.

    Sent from my XT1254 using Bowhunting.com Forums mobile app
     
  5. Riverduck11

    Riverduck11 Weekend Warrior

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    I agree that a knock on the door is more valuable than a cold call. I have been told no before and left my business card just so he may remember me and they call a week or so later and say it is fine now that their relative got his deer or gun season is over.
     
  6. Me53

    Me53 Weekend Warrior

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  7. remmett70

    remmett70 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I would break the ice just asking for permission to hike or snowshoe or XC Ski. Get in and be able to scout around see if there are signs of others hunting the area already.

    Make a few trips over the winter and try to time then so you will be able to shoot the breeze with them. Should give you a better idea if they would allow hunting or not.


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  8. bucksnbears

    bucksnbears Die Hard Bowhunter

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    be 100% genuine
     
  9. Sota

    Sota Legendary Woodsman

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    Say please and thank you no matter the outcome say mam and sir and do not wear saggy pants and a flat brimmed hat.
     
  10. Afflicted

    Afflicted Grizzled Veteran

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    Come with an offer.

    Help with some mowing or plowing during the year. Give something to them they need or want.

    Dudley mentioned offering to mow there fire lanes.


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  11. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

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    I am not a cold knock on the door type of guy. Now granted I think that has more to do with an area or culture of a given area but you just show up on some doors a knockin and it's viewed as slightly intrusive.

    I have lived by drafting a letter which accomplishes 4 main things; introduces myself in enough depth that I'm not just some Joe Bob to them after reading, explains my personal hunting habits (bow only, ethical and cameras if allowed), express my respect to the landowner and commitment to helping them in whatever way assists (trash pick up, tree cutting, plantings)...and finally closes with the explanation of why I chose a letter to not have to put them on the spot with a cold knock on their door. They can think on it some first. I let them know I might swing by in the coming weeks for a face to face but also include my phone number, email and an envelope with postage already on it (but not filled out) if they choose to mail me back.

    No matter what approach you'll never bat better than 1/4 but all you need is that 1 or 2 and you are good!
     
  12. Sota

    Sota Legendary Woodsman

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    Good point Ty, my driveway is a half mile long and if somebody just drives up it is intrusive.
     
  13. outdoordad

    outdoordad Newb

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    I would definitely recommend writing the letter before showing up. I do exactly as Ty suggested in writing a letter, and remember to keep it short and sweet. No landowner wans to read a 3 page letter. Make it brief and to the point and you should get a call.
    This is my first year hunting deer, and it was a lot of work to get on the private ground I'm on now. Do your research, look at maps online, find the land you want, find out who owns it, then ask. You'll get told "no" more times than you can count, but all it takes is that 1 landowner to hook you up. I was turned down more than 50 times before I met the landowners that gave me almost 1200 acres to bow hunt.
     
  14. greatwhitehunter3

    greatwhitehunter3 Grizzled Veteran

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    Never asked permission for deer hunting before but have to do it all the time for goose hunting. Little bit different scenario because it's usually a one day deal instead of season long like archery. I've never offered to help with anything but always offer any birds we may shoot. Let them know your intentions, and NEVER leave the place in worse shape than it was if you do get permission. This happens a lot more for birds because we have to drive into fields that may be muddy or have crops and so forth but pick up your trash and anybody else's if you find some.

    Hardest part is timing. Pulling up into a yard when they are busy doing something else usually rushes the conversation and doesn't go nearly as smooth in my experiences.

    My best advice is wear presentable clothes, drive a presentable vehicle and be polite. It's really not too tough and the worst they can say is no. Thank them for their time if that is the end result and move on to the next place. I'm always asking farmers for permission so I try to have a conversation with them about how harvest is going or BS about markets/weather and so on.

    Good luck!
     
  15. Sota

    Sota Legendary Woodsman

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    Do not call or stop by between 5-7 pm.
     
  16. whitetaildna

    whitetaildna Newb

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    I wrote an article on my blog about this very topic back in the summer. I hunt all public land, or by permission. I knock on twenty plus doors every year, as I am always trying to access new property or hunt where I find bucks during the summer. I think these tips make a difference for me getting permission every year. 6 Tips For Asking Permission To Hunt on Private Land | WhitetailDNA
     
  17. BuffaloBill

    BuffaloBill Weekend Warrior

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    I like this method. I may send out some letters after the Holidays. I would still meet with them face to face. Like you said, showing up at their door kind of puts them on the spot. Although they could just toss the letter in the trash. But it only takes one or two people to respond to get you some new hunting property.

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  18. sycamoretwitch

    sycamoretwitch Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Treat each situation and potential property as it's own unique situation. What works for one property/owner may not work for the next.

    The first thing you should do is find out if you know anyone who knows the land owner (preferably a non hunter) that might be able to introduce you, provide you with a phone number or e-mail. As has been suggested above - you don't want to come across as intrusive so finding creative ways to opening up doors to a conversation is really important.

    If you don't know the land owner then likely the only motivation for that land owner to let you hunt is money. So go in with a number that you are willing to pay - around here 80 acres would go for around $1,200 annually so I go in with a partner or two to help with the price and the work load (hanging stands, recovering deer, trail cams) this has to be a trusted friend or hunting partner that you trust and has similar goals.

    - Other motivations to consider: offer them some of the meat if you harvest anything in the property. This is a food thing to do even if you don't bring it up in the negotiations. If it's a farmer then he knows that your presence might help with crop damage - offer to thin the heard for him by harvesting a predetermined bag limit each year. If land owner is elderly offer to help keep an eye on the property and post no trespassing signs throught the property for increased security.

    I always like to offer new landowners a bow hunt olny proposition - if they are reluctant due to liability concerns this might help ease some fears. You're also showing some flexibility early on and I think that comes off as genuine. Most homeowners insurance policies include $100,000 or more worth of coverage and liability insurance in case something happens to you while on the property. Be prepared for this to come up but don't be the one to bring this up. Reason being, it could create unnecessary fear for the landowner that they didn't even consider until you said that.

    I could go on and on about this topic. I have hunted so many different properties and leases the last 7 years and I've gained access in a variety of ways.

    Note: Be smart! If you don't get around to asking for permission until say November 11, 2017 and the land owner is an elderly male then wish him Happy Veterans Day before you do anything else. This worked for me once, I'm convinced it got me access to a neighboring 50 acres giving me access to 100 total.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2016
  19. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

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    I have sent out probably over 24 in my recent years.....only once did someone not read it that I know of. 4 properties I never heard and they were never home to swing in.
     

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