What should I use for grass control in clover

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by copperhead, Jun 5, 2016.

  1. copperhead

    copperhead Grizzled Veteran

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    Thought about getting arrest but is there anything out there that might be better? We mow it but want to make sure the clover has little competition if possible.
     
  2. elkguide

    elkguide Grizzled Veteran

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    I just mow my plots and then top dress them with fertilizer and every other year I top seed a little bit more clover seed.
    It's not a lawn and deer don't seem to worry about a little grass being mixed in.
     
  3. purebowhunting

    purebowhunting Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Clethodim is a grass herbicide, I'm in the same situation and plan to spray in the next week.
     
  4. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

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    Clethodim will do the trick...however I side a little more with elkguide on this. These are food plots, not lawns. Deer love diversity and eat more "weeds" than not honestly. Some they love! Mowing and light overseeding along with fertilizer will keep the clover doing much better than anything else...clover slowly takes over the area after a year or two of mowing the weeds anyways.
     
  5. Sota

    Sota Legendary Woodsman

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    Make sure you use crop oil with it for the best shot at success. Grass control other than the soil test is the best investment I have made in my plot. I used Clethodim on the grass in the plot and around the outside, the clover and alfalfa are looking the best it ever has.
     
  6. bucksnbears

    bucksnbears Grizzled Veteran

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    tinym is right about some broadleaf weeds but the OP's asking about grasses which in my opinion should be a complete kill-off
     
  7. copperhead

    copperhead Grizzled Veteran

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    Thanks all. I'll keep with the mowing and fertilization to see how it goes.
     
  8. foodplot19

    foodplot19 Grizzled Veteran

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    Sota is right on. I used the brand name Arrow mixed with crop oil. Did a great job of clearing up alfalfa and clover.
     
  9. jake_

    jake_ Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Bonide Grass Beater works. Same stuff as Arrest but 10$ cheaper. Google it.

    This year I hit some spots with a 1% round up mix. 1 oz of round up per gallon of water. Seems to be working.

    But I agree with the mowing and fertilizer (0-0-60)
     
  10. popgun

    popgun Newb

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    Bonide Grass Beater is fine but it takes 3-4 pints per acre to control most grasses. It's not cheaper than Arrest Max on a 1-acre application. It only took 1 pint to clear up the grass in my clover/alfalfa plot. The key is an early application. Ideally, apply when the grasses are 6-10" tall in the spring, depending on the type grass you have and a crop oil is not required.
     
  11. nutritionist

    nutritionist Weekend Warrior

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    volunteer, select, arrow, poast are all versions. Use 6-10 oz/acre and make sure to read label instructions in regard to using crop oil. I also recommend using foliar plant foods at the same time. They will give your forages a kick, increase plant yield, protein energy and mineral contents. For $5-10 per acre why not? It's a 40-1 return on the investment.
     

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