What is meant by "Back Wall" in terms of...

Discussion in 'Bowhunting Talk' started by BigSarge1974, Jan 21, 2012.

  1. BigSarge1974

    BigSarge1974 Weekend Warrior

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    In bow lingo the term of "back wall" comes up quite often. What do you guys think this means and how would you explain this to somebody getting in the archery hobby?

    I am pretty sure I have a good grasp on this but wanted to start a thread and see what comes about...Have at it.

    Sarge
     
  2. SouthDakotaHunter

    SouthDakotaHunter Die Hard Bowhunter

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    As I think about it, does seem kinda hard to put into words… But something like:

    In the most simplest sense, when you draw your bow and it’s in the fully drawn position, how does it feel when you are there - in the correct fully drawn position? Can you easily tell if you’re at the end of the draw cycle – I would call that a “hard backwall”. If when you are fully drawn you can find yourself increasing/decreasing the draw just a bit and it’s harder to feel that end, I would call that a “soft backwall”….

    I’m sure someone else has a better explanation than me :-)
     
  3. Fitz

    Fitz Legendary Woodsman

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    Thats pretty good ^^^

    Some bows you can "overdraw" a bit, depending on you DL & the cam shape, this can give a "soft" feeling. Others have drawstops which give a real solid feel.
     
  4. elkguide

    elkguide Grizzled Veteran

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    With a bow with limb stops, when you draw and reach the end of the draw cycle, the stops hit the limbs and leave you with no more room to pull back, causing a hard back wall. (my preference)
    A bow with cable stops when a stop hits the cables at full draw, tends to have a little bit of room to pull and thus gives you a softer back wall.
    Some, especially older bows, didn't have stops and you really had a harder time deciding how far to draw unless your bow was set up perfectly and you always anchored perfectly in the same spot every time.
     
  5. Hoythews71

    Hoythews71 Weekend Warrior

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    "Overdrawing" a bow. When you get to full draw, a solid back wall just stops and has no rearward creep. This is usually because of draw stops on the cams that hit the limbs to avoid over drawing. Theres a few cam models out there that can actually lock up if they are overdrawn, causing the bow to be stuck at full draw...I know Id crap my pants if I had a bow in my hands that was drawn back without any tension on the string! Thats like holding a timebomb waiting to go off!
     
  6. Sticknstringarchery

    Sticknstringarchery Grizzled Veteran

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    I think that pretty much wraps it up on the description. Not much to add except my preference of the type of back wall I prefer. I started out with a bow that had no stops so it was really hard to become really consistent which made it some what frustrating in the beginning. However, it did force me to learn to use my anchor points correctly to become more accurate. My second bow didn't have them either but, it had more aggressive cams so it was easier to feel the back wall. I was way more accurate with it than I was with the old bow. Now my new one has the stops. I don't have it set up yet so I don't know exactly how accurate I will be with it but, I couldn't shoot groups with the last one due to damaging arrows so I am fully expecting to be much more accurate with my new one. I believe the more solid the back wall the more consistent one can be with form therefore being more accurate.
     

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