Turnip, Radish, Sugar Beet Plot

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by vermontwhitetail, Aug 1, 2020.

  1. vermontwhitetail

    vermontwhitetail Die Hard Bowhunter

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    This is an old clover plot that had turned to weeds. I sprayed it with roundup and fertilized(19-19-19) last week. Today I tilled and planted. First time using the brand new Kabota L3901 and 5' Countyline tiller, love them both. Beautiful 6" -8" deep rich VT seed bed. Planted More Wildlife seeds. Before and after tilling pics. I'll post more pics when it starts to grow. Rain two days ago made the soil moist and rain tomorrow will help the soil to dirt contact. I also raked over the top of the seed lightly. 20200731_094533.jpg 20200801_071428.jpg 20200801_073337.jpg
     
  2. oldnotdead

    oldnotdead Grizzled Veteran

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    That looks to be some rich soil..
     
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  3. Bootlegger

    Bootlegger Grizzled Veteran

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    Very nice! Got my smallest field half ready for winters peas & purple top turnips today.[​IMG]

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  4. bowhunt4abuck

    bowhunt4abuck Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Broadleaf weeds had taken over about 30-40% of my clover plot and mowing wasn’t touching them so I finally threw in the towel and sprayed roundup and 2-4d Saturday. Gona broadcasts a brassica blend on the third weekend I think is is what I’ve gathered should work with 2-4d


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  5. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

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    Depending on the types of broadleafs that would be a welcomed thing on my property, clover mixed with desirable forbs/broadleafs too many consider weeds is merely UPPING what is offered to the deer.
     
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  6. oldnotdead

    oldnotdead Grizzled Veteran

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    One of my favorite weed on our place is pokeweed ,second is inedible elderberry.
     
  7. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

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    Pokeweed, elderberry, common ragweed are all EXCELLENT. Goldenrod at it's younger stages isn't terrible, along with many others. I also love seeing milkweed for the butterflies despite no deer value.
     
  8. bowhunt4abuck

    bowhunt4abuck Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Long stem with lots of skinny leaves. I feel like it was starting last year and those spots were barren by middle of hunting season while the clover was still green and drawing. That was mostly what I was worried about.its only .4 acres as it is so I would prefer it be mostly food still for as long as possible.


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  9. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

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    I mean this with all sincerity, without identification how do you know it was still food? A large chunk of a deer's day to day diet is from forbs. There is no telling though.
     
  10. bowhunt4abuck

    bowhunt4abuck Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I just know by mid November the spots that stuff was in were basically just dead matter and dirt. The clover while not exactly looking as beautiful as it does in the summer was still drawing deer. I probably overreacted I’m sure but if I get this brassica plot up well (or winter rye if that fails) I’ll be in good shape regardless. Been wanting to try a full stand of brassicas somewhere anyway I just kinda wish I would have committed a little sooner. We will see if I regret it I guess lol


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  11. foodplot19

    foodplot19 Grizzled Veteran

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    You can always use Butyrac 200 on clover to get rid of the broadleaf weeds you don't want. 2-4d can also be used as it won't "kill" clover either.
     
  12. foodplot19

    foodplot19 Grizzled Veteran

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    If you just planted your brassica's you planted them at the right time for this part of the world. They should be in good shape by the first frost. One thing to remember is not to plant them too thick. The area they take up will more than cover the ground when use as recommended. I'm doing a plot for our neighbor. It's only about 1/2 an acre. I have a 10lb mix that I use from the local seed store. This mix is for an acre. The neighbor said just go ahead and put it all out. I explained what the issue would be and he said he was fine with hit. We shall see how it looks.
     
  13. foodplot19

    foodplot19 Grizzled Veteran

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    Funny you mention milkweed. We took our ground out of production this year and enrolled in the Monarch Pollinator program. This is the first year and it's a little rough, as they said it would be, however the amount of flowers and milkweed that are visible is amazing. There are lots of forbs in this mix and the deer seem to be out in the field a lot just graving around.
     
  14. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

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    Wait...you mean deer eat items not from normal plot mixes :) LOL
     
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  15. oldnotdead

    oldnotdead Grizzled Veteran

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    I mention a lot the importance of hunters knowing not just trees but weed forbs. People think I'm crazy leaving areas of poison ivy. I have a small hay mix I'm allowing to go back because of the amount of ragweed, goldenrod coming in. I just mowed a path nearer to stand through it. Pic of the big buck I posted in best things in life ,weren't eating the plot clover. They were hammering the wild raspberries,blackberry bushes and pokeweed I leave lining most plots .Those and brush honey suckle, grey dog wood, even some autumn olive.
     
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  16. bowhunt4abuck

    bowhunt4abuck Die Hard Bowhunter

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    That’s all fine and dandy they are eating that stuff now but how much of that stuff is viable in 3+ months? I know they will eat dogwood I have a few planted myself but a lot of the other things mentioned won’t be viable food sources when I’m gona be there. Feel free to correct me if I’m wrong. Not to mention it’s growing everywhere else too. I’m not try to act like I know it all (I clearly don’t) I’m just asking questions.


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  17. bowhunt4abuck

    bowhunt4abuck Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I will be planting in two weeks I heard I had to wait 3 after using 2-4d


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  18. foodplot19

    foodplot19 Grizzled Veteran

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    I've only ever waited 10-14 days.
     
  19. bowhunt4abuck

    bowhunt4abuck Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Interesting, what rate do you spray at? I put just under a quart on that half acre


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  20. oldnotdead

    oldnotdead Grizzled Veteran

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    Nothing wrong with questions and even Gods not a know it all. We're proof of that.
    The thing about many plants not being viable, especially in cold regions is true to a point. You mentioned dogwood, so lets take that. As they loose their leaves and fruit is gone your into that deer digestive system switch. Their rumans are going from soft green mast to woody type forbs. Which are the nuts, barks, twigs of brush and trees.. Now lets look at what I call bramble wild raspberry and black berry. Here in the NY hills I count on these being green when all other green is gone. Give me a early snow drop and they are the easiest green for deer. Golden rod well Let me tell you when they stop eating it,you can bet they're bedding in it. That is why the biggest sanctuary in our area and my hunting nightmare is on my neighbors land where they keep a several acre golden rod field.
    It's all a matter of balance. I do many small plots as "trail plots" that I maintain woody weedy edges. Then there are the natural grasses and ferns the vines . All great late winter attractions when those plots are either eaten to dirt or under snow. Wild rose, they eat tips, hips and big patches as cover.
    Wild clovers and vetches,trifoil,,wheat, plantains, grasses,such a big list. As far as elderberry goes they will eat those to dirt.
     
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