Tuning

Discussion in 'Bowhunting Talk' started by Coarrowkiller, Jan 8, 2017.

  1. Coarrowkiller

    Coarrowkiller Newb

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    How do I tune my bow for cheap


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  2. dukester78

    dukester78 Weekend Warrior

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    would be hard to explain in message your local shop shouldn't charge you,a bunch,last time did mine 20 bucks,I go too Matthews dealer

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  3. elkguide

    elkguide Grizzled Veteran

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    Unfortunately if you are asking that question, the learning curve is quite steep and while many here could walk you through the basics, there might be something else going on that without seeing it we could overlook telling you to do or that we might see and fix. Spend the money at a good bow shop and watch and learn. Why just having to buy a bow press will set you back $300 to $1000 easily and there are lots of other tools that would be helpful to have.
     
  4. J.H.

    J.H. Weekend Warrior

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    yep, what eg said^^^

    you can also look up some of Ike's outdoors channel on youtube, he has some tuning videos that are pretty good for learning the basics.
     
  5. tkaldahl2000

    tkaldahl2000 Weekend Warrior

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    Paper tuning isn't terribly difficult, but you may have to be able to move your nocking point up or down if you don't have the ability to adjust your rest. Look up Eastons tuning guide if you really are dead set on doing it yourself.
     
  6. KjKlump

    KjKlump Weekend Warrior

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    The best you can do without a press is to make sure your axle to axle, brace height and tiller are within spec. I prefer to walk back tune instead of paper tune . Then broadhead tune.

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  7. 60X Custom Strings

    60X Custom Strings Die Hard Bowhunter

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    do a search on youtube and you will find a ton of info
     
  8. copperhead

    copperhead Grizzled Veteran

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    Cheapest way is to learn to do it yourself. Like 60X said YouTube is your friend. I you have a computer search for bow tuning, walk back tuning, broadhead tuning, spec tuning etc.

    If your bow is in spec then you will need minimal tools. Like a set of allen wrenches to adjust your sight if required.

    Your other alternative is to make a friend that knows how to do it and is willing to teach you. The internet is great but experience is priceless. There is a reason why some people make money tuning bows.

    Good luck and welcome to the obsession :tu:
     
  9. kb1785

    kb1785 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    What others have said. When I knew that my bow was in spec then I did walk back tuning. Walk back tuning I felt was better than paper tuning. Some call walk back tuning French tuning also.
     
  10. alaska at heart

    alaska at heart Weekend Warrior

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    My hunting buddy's son bought my previous hunting bow a year ago and I included the set of strings that came with the bow as I had put on a custom set from Catfish Custom Strings. Recently he texted me that he wanted to come over and "borrow my press" to put on the other set of strings. He was looking at it like changing out tires on a vehicle, not like changing the timing belt. When I related that he would then have to check ATA, draw weight, draw length, cam timing, cam sync, etc, he was dismayed because it all seemed so simple in his mind. If all that is correct with your bow OP, then doing paper, bare shaft, broadhead or walk-back/French tuning will be your next steps and readily available in Youtube tutorial form. If not, there really isn't a "for cheap" option that you will likely care for......buy the tools or pay a shop.
     
  11. alaska at heart

    alaska at heart Weekend Warrior

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    Yeah......thanks a LOT for that sage bit of advice on bow tuning Emma. :spam:
     
  12. J.H.

    J.H. Weekend Warrior

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    deleted
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2017
  13. mcwoods

    mcwoods Newb

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    I've done my bow myself for a bunch of seasons on the cheap. Get yourself a bowmaster (google it), build yourself a drawboard from a plank and a trailer winch (google it), get a reasonably accurate scale to measure draw weight and letoff, and read as much as you can get your hands on about the procedure for tuning your type of bow (single cam, twin, binary, etc.). You can buy or make yourself the squares and levels that make stuff easier too, all that is pretty cheap. I'm an engineer by trade so I have the sometimes unreasonable need to understand and do everything myself. I probably spent more than $20 of my time on it though...

    This document was helpful for me:
    http://archeryhistory.com/archerytalk/The_Nuts&Bolts_of_Archery.pdf
     
  14. blueicefire

    blueicefire Weekend Warrior

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    Agree with McWoods.. I built all my stuff for tuning and tune it myself. Then, when you make a change you can re-tune to your new change.
     
  15. JesseHunts

    JesseHunts Weekend Warrior

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    I would suggest watching some youtube videos on whatever aspect you are trying to tune dont just watch one but watch multiple there are some really good videos out there, thats how I learned, and I also asked alot of questions to people in the industry. Now I do almost all my own tuning unless a bow press is needed.
     
  16. kurveball18

    kurveball18 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I agree with above. Since I don't have a bow press I usually have the shop put my rest on and get the centershot close. Then I do walkback tuning/French tuning, and then broadhead tune. There is lots of other things you can do as well.

    As mentioned above. Youtube is awesome when it comes to this stuff.
     
  17. tkaldahl2000

    tkaldahl2000 Weekend Warrior

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    I just bought a Bowmaster portable G2 press and split limb brackets on Amazon for about $60. I needed to install a drop away rest and a peep sight and that worked perfectly. I suspect a shop would have charged me about $30 to do the work, but when it is time to change strings I will definitely earn my money back. I was a little skeptical, but it works great.
     
  18. mcwoods

    mcwoods Newb

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    That's a great start. I see you are shooting a binary cam bow - I shoot an older Quest bow that has binaries too. In my experience I would not be able to fully set up my bow without a draw board and a scale. A chronograph can be useful too, but is not necessary unless you want to get every ounce of power out of your bow.

    Even though binary cams theoretically slave to each other, and thus they should not get out of sync, they can be set up out of sync (think about if one of the slave cables is significantly longer then the other...). You need a drawboard to slowly rotate the cams and make sure they are in sync when installing new string/cables. Once they are set up in sync mine have done a great job of staying that way.

    If your cams are anything like mine they will have mechanical stops that need to be set at the correct let-off to determine the end of the draw. A scale (along with a drawboard) lets you watch the draw poundage increase, then decrease, until it reaches the desired let-off. The stops on both cams need to be adjusted to hit simultaneously, and at the point where the desired let-off is achieved. You'll need a draw board to do this, as well as a scale set up to measure draw poundage.

    A chrono isn't necessary, but does help further tune the setup by allowing you to measure the bow's output at different point in the cam's rotation. This can be adjusted by changing both slave cables simultaneously, which results in the use a different portion of the cam's rotation during draw and release. I don't believe it will make your bow any more accurate, but it does get your bow shooting as efficiently as possible. If you decide to do this make sure you keep an eye on cam lean.
     
  19. davidingle

    davidingle Weekend Warrior

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    You can teach yourself to do most of it. If you want someone else to do it, we charge $5 for general tuning which will get you from scratch to paper tuned. Hardly anyone wants to take the time to fully tune their bows past the basic paper even though I recommend it to everyone.
     

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