Specialized Arrow Selection

Discussion in 'Intro to Bowhunting & Archery' started by DawgFace, Dec 16, 2020.

  1. DawgFace

    DawgFace Newb

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2020
    Posts:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    I'm brand new to Bowhunting and as such the process of bow and arrow selection is a bit dauting. I'm hoping I can get some recommendations to the best of your ability as I know factors play in to it that requires more personalized info.

    So here goes, my Grandparents are having problems with coyotes. They've been hazing them with horns, rocks and garden hoses and while seems to work then and there. The coyotes continue to come back time and time again. Now they have asked me to step in and help. Their request is very specific to not killing them but painful hazing. I'm not one to place my opinion in matters that do not call for it. Here killing or hazing isn't a choice I have to make or even can at this point. They believe kill will increase their numbers and they believe it strongly.

    My plan is to use bludgeon tips (Saunders Archery Bludgeon) and tag them as they come near their "no go zone". Which is property where their dogs, cats and other animals they have commonly share on their small farm.

    I bought a Hoyt Bow which is set at 70lbs and adjustable down. My draw length is 28" to which it is set at as well. 70lbs is something I can comfortable draw so for me the bow is perfect. I just need to match an arrow.

    Problems I'm having relate to basic questions of which arrow. But also pertain to real world experience that I just do not have. For instance, I was thinking 70lbs bow, heavy FMJ arrow and bludgeon tip would be the best. Then I started thinking at what point does a bludgeon tip no longer bludgeon but rather pierce and become very very lethal. My guess is if that can and does happen it would happen with exactly that setup. So because of thinking like this on my part I'm hoping to cut a few corners by getting answers from experts here. I still have a lot of research to do and I know that.

    Bow is a Hoyt XP2000 with 29" draw and adjustable from 60-70lbs.

    Thank you for your answers and suggestions ahead of time.
     
  2. DawgFace

    DawgFace Newb

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2020
    Posts:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Oh and while price is a factor as always. I don't want to compromise price with real world function and results. In other words I dont need the best because it s has the best advertisement campaign or its just the gold standard of the top. But I'm willing to pay what is necessary for quality arrows here.
    Also need in addition to what arrows to use on the yotes. But also need similar practice arrows that would replicate those.
     
  3. cantexian

    cantexian Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2013
    Posts:
    5,807
    Likes Received:
    7,847
    Dislikes Received:
    5
    Shooting a bludgeon tip against those coyotes is the wrong approach. A bludgeon tip will kill small game, but, will probably wound a coyote. Wounding game and not making a reasonable effort to kill it is illegal. Most importantly, if the grandparents tactics of scaring the coyotes away are not working, kill the coyotes. The coyotes are losing their fear of humans. Use a gun or put a broadhead on the arrows and get it done. If your grandparents object to this, leave the situation alone. Their opinion will change after they lose a couple of pets. I don't see this playing out any other way.
     
    Fix, Mod-it and DarkTater like this.
  4. DawgFace

    DawgFace Newb

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2020
    Posts:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    This I am certain of. However I am hoping still to solve their issue prior to losing their beloved pets. But this eventuality is what brought me to the bow in the first place. Figured I could use it for their first approach and if it doesnt work then seamlessly change to lethal and be done with it.

    Aside from bludgeon tips is there noting in the market of non lethal. Changing bows down to in poundage is fine as long as it fits the overall bill.
     
  5. cantexian

    cantexian Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2013
    Posts:
    5,807
    Likes Received:
    7,847
    Dislikes Received:
    5
    Bows shot at animals are meant to kill regardless of what kind of tip is on the arrow. It is not a matter of if it will kill, but, how quickly. If you shoot a coyote with a bludgeon tip, you could break a leg instead of killing it. Then, it may die of starvation two weeks later because it cannot catch any prey to eat. Shoot it with a broadhead or a gun and be done with it.
     
    Fix and dnoodles like this.
  6. dnoodles

    dnoodles Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2012
    Posts:
    9,417
    Likes Received:
    11,093
    Dislikes Received:
    14
    Location:
    People's Republic of IL
    @cantexian is 100% correct.
    that set up will likely severely wound the animal even with a bludgeon tip. At least at any range at which you'd stand a realistic chance of hitting a coyote. Coyotes are very wary and incredibly quick to react to bow shots.

    If your grandparents are that objective to your killing them outright, live trap them and call animal control when you catch one and tell them the have been harassing their pets. They will likely relocate them for you....if not, well take them off several miles away and dispatch at your leisure without their knowledge.

    ...addendum. Paint ball gun with pepper balls MIGHT work but I would go with the trap.
     
    cantexian likes this.
  7. Whitetail

    Whitetail Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2011
    Posts:
    1,182
    Likes Received:
    131
    Dislikes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Northern Wisconsin
    What "problems" are you Grandparents having??? Fence them out??? Remove the food they are coming for????

    Shooting them with blunts is cruel. Kill them or leave them alone.
     
  8. Mod-it

    Mod-it Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2019
    Posts:
    1,102
    Likes Received:
    1,477
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Idaho
    I agree with all of the above. Even with a blunt tip it is going to wound them. I guarantee it will break ribs at a minimum.
    The coyotes are going to mate and make more puppies no matter if there are 10 of them or 50 of them. I do not understand the logic that reducing their numbers will result in more coyotes. Ask them if they want 10 coyotes producing litters, or 50? All an over abundance of them does is make them more desperate for food (aka bold) and spread them out over a larger area.
    The only possible non lethal things I can think of is either live traps or loading up shotgun shells with rock salt. Perhaps a close stranded electric fence setup would keep your grandparent's pets in and the coyotes out.
    If the decision was made to actually eliminate most of them a trapper will be the fastest and most efficient.
     
    dnoodles likes this.
  9. Fix

    Fix Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2016
    Posts:
    6,553
    Likes Received:
    7,637
    Dislikes Received:
    23
    Location:
    Western NY
    I'm afraid your options are limited. But as for Bow you will need to be resigned to killing.
     
    cantexian likes this.
  10. Kenneth Jasinski

    Kenneth Jasinski Newb

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2020
    Posts:
    15
    Likes Received:
    3
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    I agree, a bow is not the right choice to scare away a yote, you can break ribs, legs or spine even with a blunt. Id recommend a BB or pellet gun, Its what alot of people use on stray dogs to keep them away from pets or houses. Its like a bad bee sting to them plus very very unlikely to kill a yote unless shot in the eye. But in my opinion like mentioned yotes will likely keep coming back even when scared away or shot and likely lose their fear of humans. I would recommend trapping them or shooting to kill but each their own. Good luck
     

Share This Page