Soybeans

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by Fix, Jun 23, 2021.

  1. Fix

    Fix Grizzled Veteran

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    Well that sucks. 41% killed it all. I can only find a few soybeans.
    Times for plan B PXL_20210702_151015555.jpeg
     
  2. greatwhitehunter3

    greatwhitehunter3 Grizzled Veteran

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    There's no way glyphosate should have killed soybeans assuming they were roundup ready.

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  3. Fix

    Fix Grizzled Veteran

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    Not sure what to tell you. 80 % of them are burned
    I'm guessing the roots were not deep enough
     
  4. Fix

    Fix Grizzled Veteran

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    I see 2 the rest is weeds PXL_20210702_151021359.jpeg
     
  5. GregH

    GregH Legendary Woodsman

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    That is not from the glyphosate. Something else has happened.

    I know you said that you broadcast the beans but how did you prep the ground/soil. Did you fertilize, rototill or disk then plant?

    I've had good luck with broadcasting beans.

    My thoughts are that 1) weeds overtook the beans and shaded them out or 2) Is there a chance that the bean seed was old?

    I planted 1 to 2 year old bean seed and had a complete failure. Big learning experience.
     
  6. GregH

    GregH Legendary Woodsman

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    The burn down doesn't look complete. At this point in time maybe hit it with glyphosate again and then around the third week of July till and plant brassicas.
     
  7. Fix

    Fix Grizzled Veteran

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    I ran out of 41 that's why it's green in the middle. It was disc'd then broadcasted then dragged.
    The weeds grew fast as balls and might have shadowed them though. I'm going to burn again then cast radishes in August.
     
  8. greatwhitehunter3

    greatwhitehunter3 Grizzled Veteran

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    It's tough from the picture but all i'm seeing is dead grass, some drying common ragweed and a couple healthy clover. Not seeing any bean carcasses anywhere so if I had to guess, like Greg said, you likely never had much of a stand to begin with. I've broadcast soybeans before and have had decent luck but you still can probably only expect 50-75% of what you spread to grow. If you add in soybeans with bad germ you can probably knock another 10-20% off that number before they left the bag.

    Really sucks to see what happened but I would say it's about a 1% chance it had anything to do with glyphosate unless they weren't roundup ready.
     
  9. GregH

    GregH Legendary Woodsman

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    On Saturday the farmer sprayed his beans for a second time. I'm not sure what exact product he used but it took effect quick. You could see the weeds starting to turn yellow by Sunday afternoon. The pic below is after three days.

    I don't recall ever seeing a field being sprayed twice. Maybe Travis or someone else can tell me how common it is for that to happen?

    beans sprayed twice.jpg
     
  10. oldnotdead

    oldnotdead Grizzled Veteran

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    your beans look great...I know what happened to mine in upper plot. Apparently the clover and tons of dropped mulberries weren't enough for them...

    where my beans went 6-4-2021.JPG
     
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  11. greatwhitehunter3

    greatwhitehunter3 Grizzled Veteran

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    This year due to corn growing so fast and 10 days above 90 we only sprayed our beans 1 time (2 with a preemerge) otherwise we always spray our beans 1 time pre emerge and 2 times post emerge.

    1st pass we use Dual and dicamba. Do this application before we really start even seeing beans. This way we can spray through our countless waterways and not worry about spraying fencelines and pasture. Both of these products also have some residual so we can hold off 10-14 days for the second application.

    We come back with a 2nd application of Fusilade and Roundup. This cleans up the volunteer corn and any weeds that made it through the pre's and dicamba application. This program has been great for us.

    The way it looks to me Greg, is the farmer came back and smoked the grasses that escaped or emerged later than his first application.
     
  12. GregH

    GregH Legendary Woodsman

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    Travis, thanks for the reply. As I said, I have never seen the farmer spray his beans twice. That doesn't mean that he don't do it because I'm not always there to see everything.

    Since I am not in it for the money, my beans are only for wildlife and never harvested. To this end, I have learned that to get the best results for the least amount time and money, I only spray them once. I try to spray them when they are growing at a good pace and still even with the weeds. That way I'll do less damage with running them over with my tractor and they'll canopy before new weeds can overtake them.

    Something else I've not seen: The cornfield on the far right in my pictures belongs to another farmer that owns the field. He is a decent size operation and owns about 1400 acres and farms around 4500+ acres.

    This is the 13th year in a row that he has planted that field in corn. I see him apply anhydrous in the spring and spray once when the corn gets taller. I'm surprised that he never rotates the crops on that field. The other farmer always rotates his crops.

    Have you ever heard of not rotating crops?
     
  13. greatwhitehunter3

    greatwhitehunter3 Grizzled Veteran

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    Does he have cattle? Guys certainly do a couple years corn on corn even without cattle but it's not crazy common to go more than 2 to maybe 3 years in corn before rotating out. In year's when corn markets expect to be higher than soybean, guys will do corn on corn instead of rotating. Problem with corn on corn is you're limiting yourself to different herbicide modes of action, disease prevalence rises and you're asking for trouble with insects; especially rootworms.
     
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  14. GregH

    GregH Legendary Woodsman

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    He doesn't have cattle. A lot of times his corn does not look as good as the corn the other guy plants when they are side by side. For an operation of his size I find this baffling.

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  15. greatwhitehunter3

    greatwhitehunter3 Grizzled Veteran

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    Oh yeah, corn on corn makes for some pretty tough looking crops a lot of times and takes a TON of fertilizer. I can't imagine how low his P and K are in that field.

    I've got 2 fungicide trials this year. Corn on corn and corn after soybeans. Exact same layout, exact same hybrids and exact same planting date, planted 200 yards apart. The corn on corn is about 2 feet shorter than the corn after soybeans and had about 15% less of an initial stand.
     
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  16. GregH

    GregH Legendary Woodsman

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    Thanks for the info.

    A buddy of mine leases his land to the guy whose soybeans I posted a picture of. He used to rent my ground until I took it over. I found out that when renting ground, the guy would fertilize and spray the crops but was hesitant to lime the fields because he wasn't sure if he'd be able to rent them the following year. My buddy agreed to a multi-year lease as long as the farmer also limed the field.

    BTW, I had to lime the hell out of mine when I took it over.

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  17. greatwhitehunter3

    greatwhitehunter3 Grizzled Veteran

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    It's definitely tough putting inputs into the ground if you don't know if you'll have it the following year. 5+ year contracts are the way to go if you can get that agreement for sure! We picked up a new farm this spring and the farmer last year certainly did not spend much or any $ on herbicide. Waterhemp pressure was unreal. Thankfully I think we got them smoked with dicamba.
     
  18. GregH

    GregH Legendary Woodsman

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    Even without much rain my beans are doing good. That is my big dog in the pic. He's about 34 inches to the top of his head. I can't see him at all times when he patrols the perimeter of the field now. He does like to pose for pics!



    [​IMG][​IMG]

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  19. oldnotdead

    oldnotdead Grizzled Veteran

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    You know not too long ago a NYS (our area) seed supplier got in big trouble for selling farmers the wrong seed and cost them $$$$$$$ . Never assume your to blame until you research a problem on suppliers end. I'd go to the supplier with your pictures and ask them to explain. Did you save the bags?
     
  20. OhioXbowhunter

    OhioXbowhunter Weekend Warrior

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    I thought about planting soybeans next year i have a 35 acre field I can plant


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