Single pin sights and fixedblade broadheads

Discussion in 'Bowhunting Talk' started by nmwilcox84, May 20, 2016.

  1. nmwilcox84

    nmwilcox84 Newb

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    Has anyone had a problem with shooting a single pin adjustable yardage sight, either HHA, Apex or Tru Glo and had a problem of your fixed blade broadhead shooting differently than your field points? Do you just adjust your sight to your broadhead or to fix the problem or would you have to fix your yardage tape? Just curious? I am just researching them before I get one.
     
  2. early in

    early in Grizzled Veteran

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    No. I've never had a single issue using my HHA, I love that sight. If you're just hunting whitetails, get it dialed in for 20 or 25 yrds and leave it alone. You can compensate for any minor yardage differences by aiming a bit higher or a bit lower, depending on the situation.
     
  3. JDUB

    JDUB Weekend Warrior

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    The sight doesn't have anything to do with fixed blade broadheads not having the same point of impact(POI) as your field points. The goal is to get your bow tuned to have your broadheads and field points hitting as close together as possible. Then your sight should be adjusted to match aiming point with actual POI. If you aren't able to get your bow tuned take it to someone who knows how and ask them to teach you how. Remember that if your broadheads hit 2" off field points at 20yards it could be off 4" at 30 yards and 8" at 40!! Otherwise you have to sight in using your broadheads POI which is ok but not ideal as your arrows are likely not flying true to the target which may effect penetration.
     
  4. kurveball18

    kurveball18 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    JDUB is correct. Go on Youtube and look up walk back tuning and then Broadhead tuning. They essentially are the same thing but its necessary to get your rest dialed in to get fixed heads to fly straight for you. This has nothing to do with your sight being a single pin.

    Once you understand the concept you will be happy you did it. You'll see your accuracy get better and you'll want to learn more. I was addicted to watching youtube videos picking up little bits of info from each guy and then coming on here and asking questions when I didnt understand something was also a big help.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2016
  5. victoryhunter

    victoryhunter Weekend Warrior

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    I second what JDUB and kurveball said. I highly recommend the HHA, I love mine and won't be switching it for anything.
     
  6. Clem

    Clem Weekend Warrior

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    I'm a relative newbie and I was been messing around with my set up prior to Turkey season to get a Magnus Bull head flying right, my explanations my be a bit more simple if you haven't be doing this long. When you start messing with Rest positions you start learning a lot about the physics behind what happens in the 1/1000s of a second that the arrow is being accelerated by the string.

    So to expand on what "tuning your bow" refers to is getting your string and rest aligned with your Point of Aim. The trouble comes as an fletched arrow with a field point on it will have its flight corrected ie. if you rest is to the right of center and so the arrow is being pushed slightly side ways through the air, the fletching will do its job and straighten the flight.

    Now you come along and shoot a Broadhead with this same system, your fletchings are not as effective at straightening the flight of the arrow as there is a wing on the front of your arrows (the broad heads blades) are acting as fletching fighting the straighten effect the real fletchings have on the arrow flight.

    The solution get your rest in alignment with your string. Note I did not say move your rest, sometime people move their string with a method called yoke tuning where twists are added to a side of the Y cables connected to the cams to fix or create cam lean to move the string behind the rest. My bow (Halon) you can't yoke tune them so I moved my rest.

    Tuning Methods:
    Paper tuning - tears in the paper indicate arrow flight being not in alignment.
    Pros - Does not require accurate shots to determine the alignment problems
    Cons - any bow torque can be interpreted as a rest issue when it is really your shooting form

    Walk back tuning - you shoot groups of arrows at 5/10/20/30 yards an notice groups moving one way indicates that the arrows are being pushed in that direction
    Pros - simple, uses field points so you don't mess sup your target
    Cons - requires accurate and consistent shooting to be effective
    - requires more space if you can only shoot 20 yards in your back yard it is a bit hard to do.


    Broad Head tuning - shoot FP and BH and adjust rest/yokes to get them hitting the same
    Pros - can be done in limited space.
    - confirms that your broad heads are hitting where you want them so you know your can hit a deer with them when it counts
    Cons - Messes up targets
    - You have to be able to shoot accurately

    Bare Shaft Tuning - shoot bare shafts and field points like BH and FP get them to hit in the same space. Shafts without fletching won't have their flight corrected by the regular arrows will.
    Pros - Doesn't mess up targets like BH tuning
    Cons - you still have to shoot consistently to use this tuning method.

    BTW if you have noticed that as you are sighting in your tape on your single pin sight, then you are preforming walk back tuning without even realizing it, when you watch a video describing how this is done you will understand.

    Clem
     
  7. cantexian

    cantexian Grizzled Veteran

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    I shoot a Black Gold Ambush Ascent single pin. My broadheads hit with my field tips. If tuning the bow does not fix the issue, check your arrow spine.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  8. JDUB

    JDUB Weekend Warrior

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    There's also french tuning and modified french tuning.
    Start with rest at centershot. Shoot field points or bareshaft at a piece of string 3 yards adjust sight pin to match POI to get you to hit the string.
    Then go back to 9 yards and shoot 3 shot group again at the string this time adjust rest to get group as close to string as possible if not touching it.
    Then go back to 3 yards shoot again and again adjust sight to where you can hit string.
    Thenback to say 15 yards shoot 3 shot groups at string and again adjust rest...then back to 3 yards...then back to 20yards so on and so forth making ever finite rest adjustments until you're right on.
    Then shoot a broadhead at 20 followed by a field point and I bet
    they have same POI.
    This french tune I feel is better for novice shooters
    For more consistent shooters you can use a bareshaft in this scenario
     
  9. TKP030

    TKP030 Weekend Warrior

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    like JDUB said id recommend frence tuning you can find some good videos on youtube that can give an good visual explanation of what needs to be done.
     
  10. DickensCPA

    DickensCPA Weekend Warrior

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    I use an HHA and shoot Thunderheads and they may even hit better than than my FTs. I shot Thunderheads for years until I bought a Diamond back in April 2015 and tuning that bow gave me fits. Went to Rage for one season.

    I bought an Mathews No Cam this past March and literally all I did was set my weight, matched up to the timing marks set my center shot and set nock at level. It shot bullet holes thru paper immediately and my FTs and BHs fly exactly the same.

    I added a 4X lens to my HHA Thursday for 3D and tried my Thunderheads just to see and they were spot on.
     
  11. TheHardWoods913

    TheHardWoods913 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Like already stated, if your bow is well in tune you shouldn't have an issue with broadheads having the same POI as your field points. There is no correlation between the heads and the sight you use. Once your in tune and have your broadheads flying true it just becomes a matter of preference one which sight you like or what works better for you and your hunting situations. Good luck!
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2016
  12. DickensCPA

    DickensCPA Weekend Warrior

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    X2. Every prior bow I'd ever had was a single cam. Last year that Diamond was my first dual cam - probably ignorance on my part but myself nor any body around me could get it to stay in tune. The no cam was the perfect solution for me. They should market it for dummies like me can even tune it. LOL!
     

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