Renting to clear foodplots

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by 07Tiger, Feb 4, 2011.

  1. 07Tiger

    07Tiger Weekend Warrior

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    I would like to rent something to clear out areas for foodplots. I was looking at the Bobcat Forestry Cutter or something similar. The areas are mostly small trees and brush and trees about 5-8 inches in diameter. Any ideas for me? And how does that work? Can I just call a place and tell them I want to rent a machine or what? Thanks for the help.
     
  2. TEmbry

    TEmbry Grizzled Veteran

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    IMO with trees getting that big I'd rent a dozer and do it right. No stumps or root systems to struggle with and you can shape it exactly as you please and even leave the clutter on the edges to manipulate how and where the deer enter the plot.
     
  3. BowFreak

    BowFreak Die Hard Bowhunter

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    This!
     
  4. DropTine249

    DropTine249 Weekend Warrior

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    Yes, you can rent tractor and quad implements.

    I'd leave a few of the smaller trees, if they are scattered about the field. 1- they offer a great location for trail cameras in the middle of the field, because, usually cams are placed on the edges, and, a cam in the center will not be limited to trail or field edge movement.

    2- You can use the tree to support wire mesh so you can keep deer from eating that little area, which is important for monitoring the untouched growth of the plot.

    3- Having a tree in the center that will eventually support a tree stand is ideal. It's tough getting out in the afternoon, but, 1 of my best stands is smack-dab in the MIDDLE of a foot plot.

    I like to leave some obstacles in my food plots. I dont know why, but, I feel like it's more natural, or something. As far as edge growth is concerned, clear what you need to in order to open up licking branches for scrapes during the rut, and, cut trails for easier access to the plot, while leaving the rest. This will hopefully funnel deer past a particular tree you want to hang.
     
  5. 07Tiger

    07Tiger Weekend Warrior

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    I'd love to use a dozer but I don't have access to one and I don't know how to operate one good enough to do what I want.

    We have a tractor and implements for it but I'd like to rent a forestry cutter or something similar so the brush and small trees are mulched up for the most part.

    Most of the trees are not that big and the food plots I'm going to be making are not that big, 1-2 acres probably. No fields, just plots out in the woods.
     
  6. nealmccullough

    nealmccullough BHOD Crew

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    My uncle has a brush hog implement (forestry cutter) and it is absolutely perfect for food plots. Next year I am going to create 2 or 3 - most only about 50' x 50' ... perfect hunting honey holes.
     
  7. 07Tiger

    07Tiger Weekend Warrior

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    We have a tractor and bush hog. A forestry cutter does alot more than a bush hog. It is made to basically knock down and mulch up all the brush and small trees instead of just cutting them down and leaving a big mess behind.
     
  8. buckeye

    buckeye Grizzled Veteran

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    I would have to think for the price of renting such a piece of equipment, you could just pay an operator to bring in a dozer to clear the area for you. I know around here professional operators (not guys doing it on the side) charge $90-$100 per hour.

    They are proficient with their equipment and would take them no time kocking over some small trees and brush. On top of that, you would not have any roots and stumps to deal with like you would with a forestry cutter.
     
  9. Shocker99

    Shocker99 Grizzled Veteran

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    Another vote for dozer. We did it awhile back and created a bunch of huge brush piles with what we cleared. Creates good cover for all types of animals
     
  10. EvoldedWhitetailSolutions

    EvoldedWhitetailSolutions Weekend Warrior

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    Definitely a dozer, not sure where you are located but there are plenty of equipment rental companies with dozers
     
    ajsbowhunter likes this.

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