Recurve vs Compound Draw Weight?

Discussion in 'Intro to Bowhunting & Archery' started by afishhunter, Oct 11, 2018.

  1. afishhunter

    afishhunter Newb

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    I heard that you should use a lighter pull when going from a compound to a recurve.

    How much lighter?

    I'm pulling 56 pounds on my compound.
    Is 45 "too much" or "about right" when I start using a recurve?
     
  2. StanfillKY

    StanfillKY Newb

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    The thing about compounds is they have a let off. (When you get it to a certain point it gets easier to pull/hold. Recurves have no let off. Whatever you pull back is what you have to hold.
     
  3. afishhunter

    afishhunter Newb

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    Yes, I am aware of that.
    The let-off is one of the advantages of a compound bow.
    I don't know if it is true or an urban legend, but I also heard that a compound bow has a higher arrow speed than a recurve or longbow of the same draw weight, at the same draw length.

    I still want to master the recurve ... or at least be accurate enough to harvest whatever critter I am hunting from up to 30 ~ 40 yards.
    I doubt I'll ever master any bow (with the possible exception of a scoped crossbow) to consistently hit my previous arrow from any distance like the legendary William Tell, Robin Hood, and The Avengers' Hawkeye.
    (Don't want to, either. Arrows are kinda expensive.)

    Anyway, again, it may be urban legend, but I read on the Internet somewhere (so it must be true :roll eyes: ) that a recurve or longbow needed to have a lighter pull than your compound bow "because different muscle groups are used to draw them."
     
  4. siwulat

    siwulat Weekend Warrior

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    I would absolutely go lighter than a compound. Your best bet is to go to a shop where you can shoot a variety and figure out where you're comfortable.
     
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  5. Okiebob

    Okiebob Weekend Warrior

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    I pull 70# on my compound and 48# at 29.5" on my recurve. Personally I would not take a shot over 15-20 yards with my recurve, I rarely even take shots over 30 with my compound. I would suggest the same as above, go to a bow shop and shoot a few.
     
  6. Okiebob

    Okiebob Weekend Warrior

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    You might want to look into Earl Hoyt Sr. and his wife Anne, not near as cool but also not fictional.
     
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  7. afishhunter

    afishhunter Newb

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    Unfortunately, the only Pro Shop in town is a bit light on right hand recurves.
    I think he has three used, no new, plus an old collectable Bear ambidextrous I would not even consider shooting. It's broke in at a longer draw than I have, and has solid wood limbs. With my "luck", I'd break it.
    Two of the three are 15 or 20 pound, the third at $1,850 (a special target shooting bow) is so far out of my price range, it is irrelevant. I won't even touch it. It would probably burn my hand.

    I ordered one of those Southwest Archery Spider take-down's with 60 pound draw limbs.
    At my disgusting 22 inch draw length, (I'm deformed) I should get an effective pull of 42 to 45 pounds. Regardless, it will be hunting legal at my abysmal draw length.
    Yes, I'll get the heaviest arrows I can for it.
     

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