Questions on what Food Plot Seeds to use

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by anthonyzink, Apr 8, 2015.

  1. Skywalker

    Skywalker Grizzled Veteran

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    In my opinion, seed is seed whether it's in a bag with a buck on it or in a burlap sack. What you are paying extra for in the food plot seed is generally research and marketing. The benefit to a lot of the food plot seed is that it comes already blended and sometimes inoculated and coated. If you by bulk seed, you will generally have to buy more than what you need and blend it yourself. Not hard to do, but it may or may not be cheaper. If you are planting just one variety, then buying bulk is probably a much better way to go. If you want something like Whitetail Institutes Power Plant, then you're going to be buying a bunch of different seeds to mix together, and you may end up spending just as much.
     
  2. boonerville

    boonerville Grizzled Veteran

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    I didn't say they all are...I'm truth, most aren't any better.....but some are. Labeling any buck on the bag seed as overpriced without researching it isn't fair
     
  3. Sota

    Sota Legendary Woodsman

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    I will admit there are several great seed companies with bucks on the package, for every one of those great companies there are the bone collector versions.
     
  4. CoveyMaster

    CoveyMaster Grizzled Veteran

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    Not really...
    For what the guy said he wanted and being a first time food plotter, a simple clover plot is going to cover most any need and circumstance.
    No need to make it too complicated, he can get as complicated and technical as he feels comfortable with as he gains experience.
     
  5. Skywalker

    Skywalker Grizzled Veteran

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    Regardless of whether a clover plot is the right plot for his situation, we don't know the specifics and recommending anything without specifics info is just throwing the spaghetti at the wall and hoping it sticks. He says his soil is good, but what's the pH? He didn't give that info, so if he has a 5.0 pH it's likely his clover plot will be a failure. My point is that we don't know what he wants and how he wants to maintain it. With that info, we can give him an educated opinion. How many times have people come on hear and talked about screwing up a plot because they didn't have the proper info. I remember there was a guy that planted a plot(can't remember what), then sprayed it with a chemical recommended by some moron at a box store and he ended up killing his entire plot because he used a chemical specifically designed to kill what he planted. Same thing applies here, get the info first, then make and educated decision as to what is best for his situation.
     
  6. CoveyMaster

    CoveyMaster Grizzled Veteran

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    Lol, but he did give that info. He said it was CRP and his soil was good to go, some pretty solid assumptions can be drawn from that info. CRP has to be brought up to soil test when it goes into the contract and CRP excludes a little plot back in the deep dark timber where leaves and sunlight will impact PH or hours of daylight. So three things:
    1. It's pretty safe to assume in KS that his PH is fine based on the fact it was/is in CRP. The chances of a 5.0 PH are pretty low.
    2. He said his soil is good to go, when someone tells me that, I'm going to go ahead and make the assumption that they are telling the truth and know what they are talking about.
    3. It's fairly out in the open due to the nature of CRP.

    Has nothing to do with an old case of someone applying the wrong chemical on bad info so bad analogy there. For the info that was given, clover has a pretty high chance of success and meets the specific goals of being good for deer and turkey and pretty much year around. It's more like throwing spaghetti at the wall after being cooked and dipping it in glue. :lol:

    I appreciate your enthusiasm to be thorough and too much info is better than too little, at the same time for someone asking a fairly simple question, sometimes it's nice to get a direct and simple answer. ;)
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2015
  7. anthonyzink

    anthonyzink Die Hard Bowhunter

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    The CRP contract is over the farmer I am leasing from is the one that showed me where to put this plot in at.
     
  8. CoveyMaster

    CoveyMaster Grizzled Veteran

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    Okay, good deal. Many folks don't realize there can be fairly severe consequences for messing with (active) CRP without approval. Most offices are decent to work with people but there are also a lot of jerks around FSA offices and they can nail folks for breaking out CRP grass if they want to push it.
     
  9. anthonyzink

    anthonyzink Die Hard Bowhunter

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    That's good to know I wouldn't have known but any trouble I could get into tell you told me that! Thank you very much!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     

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