Question About new plot

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by Wisconsin Buckwatch, Feb 7, 2016.

  1. Wisconsin Buckwatch

    Wisconsin Buckwatch Weekend Warrior

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    I talked my grandpa into giving me another 1/2 acre( corn prices are so low) to plant a food plot. I want to plant soybeans, however it was beans last year, i'm wondering if i can plant it in beans again or if i should plant something else? I would like to plant something this spring maybe oats or something the deer will eat, but most likely going to till up and plant in a turnip, radish, and rape mix in august. This field has been in agriculture as long as i can remember. Any suggestions? Thanks
     
  2. jake_

    jake_ Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Yah beans are fine for 2 years in a row. My neighbor planted beans the last 8 years in the same fields. I would never do that many years though and like to rotate stuff.

    But half acre of beans would get wiped out depending on deer #s.

    I would go with buckwheat in Spring and then do a fall mix end of July / early August if it was me over beans in that size of plot.

    Good luck and keep us updated.
     
  3. Ryan A

    Ryan A Weekend Warrior

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    Ideally you should rotate it back to corn, but you could probably get away with putting beans in again. If the deer hammer the beans in the summer till it up and put turnips in during August.


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    Last edited: Feb 7, 2016
  4. Wisconsin Buckwatch

    Wisconsin Buckwatch Weekend Warrior

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    I can't do corn i don't have a drill, plus the other 65 acres of that field will be corn. I'm getting the 1/2 acre edge along the marsh and the corn. I want to plant something the will look nice(easy to grow) for a couple reasons, I want my grandpa to know I value what he is letting me do and to keep weeds from really taking over in that area before I plant for the fall.
     
  5. CoveyMaster

    CoveyMaster Grizzled Veteran

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    Pretty rough being so far north. Milo and cowpeas would work nicely here in that situation but I'm not sure up there what you have the season to do.
     
  6. foodplot19

    foodplot19 Grizzled Veteran

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    I was going to mention buckwheat as well but I've had real mixed luck with it. Some really good and some really bad. I'd imagine that if you have any other crops around the buckwheat won't be very popular. JMO.
    Covey probably hit it on the head. If soybeans work up there then cowpeas should be just fine.
     
  7. jwagn551

    jwagn551 Newb

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    If you want your planting to look nice I would suggest beans because you can hit them with glypho to eliminate competing weeds. Then inter-seed with oats, radish, or turnips early August.
     
  8. greatwhitehunter3

    greatwhitehunter3 Grizzled Veteran

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    Beans again are fine for a food plot. Farmers don't do it because it makes them more susceptible to disease, nematodes and can't use all of the same weed chemistries as rotating into another crop. As long as none of that bothers your grandpa, go for it. You can interseed whatever you want into it in late July/August too.
     

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