Preventing Broken Arrows - Hunting

Discussion in 'Intro to Bowhunting & Archery' started by GhostNoc, Nov 12, 2018.

  1. GhostNoc

    GhostNoc Newb

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    hello,

    when shooting at squirrels and rabbits, how do i prevent breaking and losing arrows out of a compound bow?
     
  2. jstephens61

    jstephens61 Weekend Warrior

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    Stop shooting tree rats and bunnies with a bow?
    Seriously, I shoot squirrels from the tree stand, no lost arrows.
     
  3. GhostNoc

    GhostNoc Newb

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    Any real answers?
     
  4. Holt

    Holt Grizzled Veteran

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  5. GhostNoc

    GhostNoc Newb

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    What are lighted nocs?
    Will footers really prevent a fracture or loss?

    I also have concerns about a fractured carbon arrow finding it’s way into my plate... like eating slivers...
     
  6. Holt

    Holt Grizzled Veteran

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    Lighted nocks are just that. A small led light inside your nock that lights when shot. It would make it easer to find your arrow. Making a footer and putting it on the end of your arrow will help stop the end of your arrow from splitting. In the past 3 years of using footings, I have only broke 1 arrow on the end.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Bowhunting.com Forums mobile app
     
  7. GhostNoc

    GhostNoc Newb

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    Thanks

    Any tips for not finding slivers of carbon in my food?
     
  8. dnoodles

    dnoodles Grizzled Veteran

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    not breaking arrows.
     
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  9. axtell343

    axtell343 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I guess you should inspect your arrow after the shot? If the arrow broke inside the rabbit/squirrel and was really splintered your gonna have to judge for yourself. But I would imagine that the arrow is going to pass through your target, even if it breaks there shouldn't be any splinters in your game meat.

    You could also use small game heads that are designed to not pass through small game. Blunt heads, judo points & more that will kill with blunt force trauma or limit penetration on small game.

    These are also pretty nasty, The G5 Small game heads.

    If your shooting something as small as a squirrel they are gonna get the job done and then some.

     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2018
  10. dnoodles

    dnoodles Grizzled Veteran

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    I was being trite.
    Footers will help keep the tip of the arrow shaft from splintering if you should have impact with a hard object like a rock or a root. No guarantee, though. They are used with HIT inserts which leave the carbon exposed at the tip vs. standard inserts which already extend past the carbon. No advantage (and not sure if they're even compatible) using a footer with a standard insert.

    Personally, I don't even think of using my arrows on small game; it's not even a temptation. At nearly $15 per arrow (not counting broadhead) it would get real expensive really fast. Squirrel stew ain't worth it. If you're dead set on shooting small game while bowhunting for larger game, if legal I'd take a good pellet gun out with me. About the same amount of noise, way cheaper, more shot options (shooting upwards toward tree dwellers); and less meat damage too.
     
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  11. jstephens61

    jstephens61 Weekend Warrior

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    Mine was a real answer.
    If you must, set up some good ol’ aluminum arrows. No carbon fibers to worry about.
     
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  12. Sota

    Sota Legendary Woodsman

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    Is it possible to turn down the draw weight? Small game does not need to be hit as hard as a deer.
     
  13. WillO

    WillO Die Hard Bowhunter

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    What he said.

    No way would I fire circa $25 worth of equipment towards a squirrel and risk it breaking.

    Get a cheap pellet gun
     
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  14. dnoodles

    dnoodles Grizzled Veteran

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    heck, I got a good Hatsan for like $100. Threw a $40 red dot on it and I can get super tight groups out to 40 yards. The things a screamer, too.
    I'd shoot a coyote in the head with it in a heartbeat knowing that's a dead dog.

    I've never taken it into the woods with me when out for deer but that's only b/c I hunt mostly public and I already take a lot of gear in and out. Plus don't really feel like getting hassled by the DNR for thinking I'm taking a rifle out during bow.
     
  15. Whitetail

    Whitetail Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Years ago (1980s) I shot a lot of squirrels/chipmunks with my bow. I turned my bow down to 45-50# and used wood/cedar arrows spined for 60# or more. They were only $1 each in those days. Even if I lost a few inches off arrow they were still shootable. We had lots of fun. I don't know if the make inexpensive wood arrows anymore.

    Now, since I have been at this archery thing for over 40 years, I have dozens of mismatched/obsolete arrows around. I still use them with Judo Points for chipmunks and red squirrels in the yard. If I break one it's no big deal. "The Boss" says grays are off limits.

    Search around, maybe you can find a bunch of old aluminum arrows someone would give you or sell cheap.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2018
  16. Skunkworkx

    Skunkworkx Weekend Warrior

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  17. John T.

    John T. Weekend Warrior

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    Lancaster Archery Supply, www.lancasterarchery.com, has several points for small game hunting. I would use aluminum arrows.
     
  18. Mod-it

    Mod-it Newb

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    I wouldn't worry about carbon splinters in the meat too much, any broken arrows are likely going to happen after they pass through the target and impact something hard behind it, unless the animal was standing right against a hard surface...I'd just avoid those shots.
    I prefer blunt tips over judo points, adder points, etc., the blunts do a great job of keeping the arrow from knifing under vegetation and being impossible to find. I'm not familiar with footers, but they sound ideal from posts above.
    I think the most important thing you can do if you stay with carbon is to inspect each arrow after a shot and be sure to flex them. Flexing them can really show you an arrow about to fail, vs. trying to visually see a hairline crack. Grab the arrow at each end and flex it, then spin it and flex it again. You want to watch for cracks that might show up better while the arrow is flexed and most importantly listen for any creaking noises from the arrow while flexing it. If it makes any noises discard the arrow.
    If you've ever seen the pics from a carbon arrow splintering apart when shot and the resulting injury to the bow grip hand, you'll become a faithful "flexer" of your arrows. I flex my arrows before every target session, and after every shot if I'm shooting grouse or something on the ground.
     

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