Oats, Winter Wheat, Winter Rye...

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by Creeks, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. Creeks

    Creeks Weekend Warrior

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    Does it die out during the spring summer months...??? I just don't know? Reason I'm asking Im thinking about tossing some of this into my clover and chicory patch come first of September and let mother nature take it's course...

    BUT, if it doesn't die down in the spring or summer, don't know if that would be a wise choice....

    Just thinking things through

    Thanks for any advice
    Creeks!!
     
  2. elkguide

    elkguide Grizzled Veteran

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    It germinates a lot quicker than the clover will so if the deer are hammering the plot as it emerges, then the rye/wheat/oats are great to use to help distract the deer while the clover gets established. Those plants are annuals so they will only be there for one season.

    As to planting in September, here in Vermont, August is a better time to plant and be established by hunting season.
     
  3. Creeks

    Creeks Weekend Warrior

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    Thanks Elk...What Im going to do is plant the Clover in February and Early March...and the reason I said September is so that the DARN thunder chickens (Turkeys) won't get them.....HOPEFULLY...the clover will be up and thick so the DARN turkeys won't get to all of them.....If you broadcast that stuff I was talking about on top of ground, they eat it up before it takes set.....

    I usually plant my other stuff in August...Turnips, Radishes, etc....but for some reason the darn Turkeys are really active during August and by September they seem to disappear....I know it sounds weird...but around here it seems to be the case...

    Thanks
    Creeks
     
  4. elkguide

    elkguide Grizzled Veteran

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    Do you have a bush hog or something to cut your food plot?

    I find that the deer like "fresh" clover a lot more and cut my established plots in June and August.
     
  5. CoveyMaster

    CoveyMaster Grizzled Veteran

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    The grassy crops you mention won't die down in spring/summer until it's gone to seed, then it will. Rye can get rather tall, don't know if you'd want to let it go or not. They will all reseed themselves to a certain extent so that's something to keep in mind as you go forward. The clover should help guard the seed but it'll probably be thick enough that the grassy crops won't do much. The only time you typically seed the grassy crops with clover is when the clover goes in, the grassy crops act as a nurse crop to take browse pressure off the new clover until it's established then as the clover establishes and into summer the annual grasses mature and peter out. If I understood the process you lay out is in reverse.
     
  6. nutritionist

    nutritionist Weekend Warrior

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    You have fall rye/winter rye, that you plant in the fall and it will regrow in the spring.
    There is spring rye that you can plant in the spring or fall and it wont regrow
    You have winter barley that might regrow the next spring but it's not as winter hearty as wheat or rye or triticale.
    You have spring barley that you can plant spring or fall and it won't regrow next spring
    You have spring triticale " " " "
    You have winter triticale that will regrow the following spring.
    You also have spring wheat that you can plant in the spring or fall and it wont regrow nest spring.
    Lastly there is winter wheat that you can plant spring or fall and it will regrow the following spring.

    Here is how they rank by quality
    triticale
    wheat
    oats
    barley
    rye

    I am a huge triticale fan since i am a nutritionist. It tolerates heavier ground better and it's higher in minerals and protein. It's why the big boys in the dairy industry are sing it over oats and wheats.

    I've done numerous trials on all the grains and each year you see about 20% more triticale going into the ground around the US.
     
  7. Creeks

    Creeks Weekend Warrior

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    Yes, I have means to cut it...
     
  8. Creeks

    Creeks Weekend Warrior

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    Thank all you fellows for all this knowledge...I appreciate the help from all of you....
    Thank You
    Creeks
     
  9. foodplot19

    foodplot19 Grizzled Veteran

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    Appreciate the info.
     

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