Need Some Basic Info

Discussion in 'Intro to Bowhunting & Archery' started by PhilthyG, Oct 7, 2014.

  1. PhilthyG

    PhilthyG Newb

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    I'm thinking about buying a bow so I can get into bow hunting and general recreational archery. I'm ex military so I know basic rifle and handgun marksmanship and I was wondering if I would be able to teach myself from internet videos or it would be worth while to get personal training initially. Also, what type(s) of bows/arrows would be ideal to start with? How much can I expect to pay for a nice target to shoot at in my backyard, is there a cheap way to make some? Is there a solid website/brand to use for bows or should I find the nearest sporting goods store? Are there different sizes of bows? What would be appropriate or a 5'10" 200 lbs male? What are some accessories that I may need?

    Also, any good "DON'T DO THIS" or "DON'T DO THAT" would be helpful.

    Basically I need a starters kit but like a legit setup that I can get good use out of.

    Please and thank you for your help!!!

    Phil in Indy.
     
  2. dwhite2011

    dwhite2011 Newb

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    Your Best bet would be to go to your local archery shop or a bigger store like cabelas and get a bow that is set up with accessories already on it. They can teach you there and help you set it up. There are tons of different bows that you can choose from. I would caution you not to go spend a butt load on your first bow since you are still learning. Maybe buy a trade in that has been gone over and freshened up. Arrows i would start with a cheap set to start with as you are going to break and lose many arrows. You can always upgrade as you learn and get better. You can normally get a cheap target for about 40 bucks. Hay bales work good but you can lose arrows in the bales and they make a mess if they get too tore up. Hope this helps you out and remember you can always get better equipment as you get better!
     
  3. mike387

    mike387 Weekend Warrior

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    A site that can help you with some if basic info on choosing a bow and the types of accessories and their advantages is huntersfriend.com
    Pretty decent site with some good info. But when buying a bow go to shop and hold it first and see if you can shoot one as well. I got lucky and got a hand me down from a friend. What you wanna buy is a ready to shoot or ready to hunt kit. Typically run about $400-$700 and come with bow, sight, rest, stabilizer, case, quiver and some arrows.
    Sizing guide:
    http://www.huntersfriend.com/bow_sizing_adjustment_guide.html
    Bow guide: http://www.huntersfriend.com/compound_bow_selection_guide.html
    Arrow guide: http://www.huntersfriend.com/carbon_arrows/hunting_arrows_selection_guide_chapter_1.htm
    Hope all the info isn't overwhelming. Good luck and hope you find something you enjoy!
     
  4. mike387

    mike387 Weekend Warrior

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    Dwhite2011 said the most important part, you can upgrade as your skills upgrade. I'm 2 weeks into this myself and already I want a new sight and rest.
     
  5. Fitz

    Fitz Legendary Woodsman

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    Yes, there are different sizes and you should find a prosho and get your draw length measured so you know what to get. Most proshops will also give you good pointers on correct form in the beginning.

    You can make a fairly cheap target out of a feed/seed bag stuffed tight with rags, but you can also find cheaper bag and block targets in the $30-50 range.

    I would actually steer clear of the big box type stores for getting your first set up, or at least getting fitted for a bow. They are often staffed by young kids or people that have little knowledge of properly setting someone up with a bow. Not always the case, but your odds are much better going to an archery shop.

    The RTS or startup kits are nice cause everything is there, but the accessories tend to be junk (rest, quiver, sight...). The good thing is that it gets you shooting quickly and you can always upgrade your accessories as you go. They if you get a new bow, you can transfer your accessories to the new bow.

    Here's a couple good spots to get you started on basic information too:

    Compound Bow Diagram | Parts of a Bow | Bowhunting.Com

    Glossary of Terms | Bowhunting and Archery Terminology | Bowhunting.Com

    http://forums.bowhunting.com/intro-bowhunting-archery/36338-**bowhunting-article-resource**.html
     
  6. Simplicity

    Simplicity Newb

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    Pick out the bow that fits you. One that is uncomfortable for you to shoot will make a huge impact on your accuracy as you progress.
     
  7. WV Jess

    WV Jess Weekend Warrior

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    I recommend you find a local archery shop and go through them. If you go to a Cabela's or Bass Pro etc., you won't always be working with a professional, just some kid who needed a part time job. Your local bow shop will be able to handle anything you might ask them.
     

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