NAP Spitfire

Discussion in 'Equipment Reviews' started by Matt9589, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. Matt9589

    Matt9589 Weekend Warrior

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    Who shoots the NAP spitfire broadheads? Im thinking about trying out a mechanical and want to use these. How do the blades hold up?
     
  2. jjnowak

    jjnowak Weekend Warrior

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    I have always been a 3 blade Muzzy guy, but I decided to try the spitfires this season. I shot 2 does with them. One was a pass though and stuck in the dirt. The blades were fine and the head was unscathed. The
    Other was a quartering away shot that hit the off side shoulder joint. This blade was also completely undamaged.

    I had never shot mechanicals before and overall I was impressed. Both deer went down within sight and had great blood trails. The only complaint I have is that it is kind of hard to clean the dirt, blood, hair, etc. from the grooves that house the blades.
     
  3. The Amatuer

    The Amatuer Die Hard Bowhunter

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    3rd attempt to post PC screwing up...

    I've shot them, I've found them to deploy well, yet if they hit a bone as they first enter a animal they will kick at 45 degree angle preventing a complete pass through....
     
  4. striker

    striker Weekend Warrior

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    I shoot the standard 100 grn (although I may go to 125 grn next season) They are my favorite broadhead. Havent had any issues at all with them breaking. I shot a doe last year at a pretty good angle quatering away and had no problems with deflection. Awesome blood trails and have never had one open in flight or not open on impact. After messing around with countless broadheads ( all performed reasonably well for me) I have finally decided on this one.
     
  5. trial153

    trial153 Grizzled Veteran

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    Killed a few now with the 100gr Spitfire edge....super performance and no issues so far. I am serrated blade fan and i been stocking up on them as I plan on using them for awhile
     
  6. Matt9589

    Matt9589 Weekend Warrior

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    i was looking at those to. Seems it will actualy ''saw'' bone.
     
  7. Lynx

    Lynx Newb

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    SPITFIRES are Accurate!!!
    I shoot field tips & my 100 gr. Spitfires in the same sessions, and they all group up Perfectly!!!

    I haven't hunted with them yet, but they end up sticking about 15 Inches through the foam target (15" thick) + the Kevlar hanging behind the target. So I'm pretty certain that these will easily pass straight though a Deer



    28", #60 Hoyt Rampage XT with spine 400 Easton FMJ's
     
  8. trial153

    trial153 Grizzled Veteran

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    I dont know about sawing bone...In fact I think they kinda miss represent that because the energy use and cutting acting of an arrow doesn't saw anything.

    One thing I do know, is that I spend 72 hours a week 9 months out of the year working as a paramedic. And my own observations, and those of the medics I work with ALL concur that sharp serrated type objects do more damage then a straight surgical type cut. We have found that the former bleeds more, is harder to control the bleeding and is generally...in lay man terms messy-er.

    I have seen no down side to the Spitfire Egde, for that matter if I was looking at one of their fixed blade models i would take a look at their Thunderhead Edge also. Check that...for Some the fact that serrated blade is pretty well not resharpenable might be an issue...But I replace the blades after use or *** needed...to its an non issue for me.
     
  9. Justin

    Justin Administrator

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    I shot a few deer with the Spitfire Maxx a few years ago, and they all went down within 100 yards of my stand. Although that was more a product of my shot placement than the head, you can't argue with those results.

    What I've found with the Spitfire is that for those guys who have shot them, they swear by them. Very rarely will you find someone who has anything bad to say about a Spitfire. That's gotta tell you something right there.
     
  10. Matt9589

    Matt9589 Weekend Warrior

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    Ya I can't find a bad review

    Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk
     
  11. Matt9589

    Matt9589 Weekend Warrior

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    Couldn't you use a serrated blade sharpener?

    Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk
     
  12. trial153

    trial153 Grizzled Veteran

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    You can I am sure, the issue is is it more trouble then its worth....the replacement blades are pretty reasonable. I shot two deer last year with the same head and I replaced one bent blade, and truthfully probably could have just straighten it out...figured better safe then sorry. The second deer I shot with the same head and all I had to do was use some cold water to clean it. I looked it over and spin tested it ect...Looks good to go me for deer number three asap. I have to be honest, most mechs I have found aspects in their design that i have issues with before and after I used them. This has not been the case with my Spitfires....Hence the fact I been buying packages when ever I see them at a good price....ebay ect...I have more then I probably will ever need...yes its neurotic but when i find something I like I am always worried that thy will stop making them...


    I have to second what Jason said, most of the guys I know that use them swear by them....and use them year in and out.
     
  13. 220

    220 Weekend Warrior

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    Well, first, let me just get it out there that I work for NAP so that's all in the clear.

    Second, I will say that for the first 20 years I spent bowhunting—I had never had enough confidence in mechanicals to actually give them a try in the field. I had "played with" a few different models over the years while practicing, but just never went forward with using any of them while hunting.

    After joining on with NAP, and endless "peer pressure" from my co-worker's about how great the Spitfire's were ... I finally gave in and decided to try out the Spitfire MAXX on a N. Dakota hunt (first video) in 2010. As you can see from the video ... the results were outstanding. Quartering shot opened him up like a zipper, with the entrance wound being over 6 inches. Arrow punched through between his shoulder and brisket on the offside. If you watch at the very end, I flip him over, and his lungs/organs are actually coming out of the entrance hole!!! Since that buck, I've used the Spitfire MAXX almost exclusively—and have only had one animal go over 70 yards from the shot since (that was largely due to a marginal hit on my part, but still recovered the buck).

    Here are a few videos of my own experiences with the Spitfire MAXX the last two seasons. In the N. Dakota "double" video, both bucks were killed with the Spitfire MAXX. In the "hog hunt" video, the first hog is actually shot with the new KillZone head while we were testing them back in July. The second hog is the Spitfire MAXX in the new D6 (Deep Six) version. As you can see, the hog didn't take the Spit MAXX well at all ...

    http://blog.newarchery.com/videos/new-archery-nation-web-show/jason-mckee-velvet-buck_12

    http://blog.newarchery.com/videos/n.../brady-and-jason-north-dakota-velvet-bucks_21

    http://blog.newarchery.com/videos/new-archery-nation-web-show/jason-mckee--florida-hog-hunt_20
     
  14. Indiana Hunter

    Indiana Hunter Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Shot 6 whitetails in 2 years with the Spitfire Maxx and the furthest any of them went was maybe 80 yards. They are great heads and I will continue to use them.

    Only thing I'm changing next year is bumping up to 125 grains :)
     
  15. Dan

    Dan Senior Member

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    Killed a couple deer and an antelope with the Spitfire Maxx last year. Great head.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Illinoishunter102

    Illinoishunter102 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I was looking into these broadheads for turkey hunting, do you guys think these heads would work well on birds?
     
  17. Matt9589

    Matt9589 Weekend Warrior

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    If they can put a 200lb+ deer down, i think a turkey is no problem!
     
  18. 220

    220 Weekend Warrior

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    Yes, you could use any of the Spitfire models on turkey ... been done for years. But, there's also a specific model for turkeys—the Spitfire Gobbler Getter's. Only difference is that the tip is blunted (looks almost like a 22 rimfire tip) in an attempt to add more shock to the impact and lessen the likelihood of a clean pass-thru. The overall goal is that the arrow hits harder and stays in the bird in an effort to knock the bird down and/or decrease the likelihood it might fly off after the shot.
     
  19. Dan

    Dan Senior Member

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    Like 220 said, they make a specific head called the Gobbler Getter. Though, I used the Spitfire Maxx last spring for them.

    Here's a Bowhunt or Die video where Dustin and I each kill 2 gobblers in Wyoming. Mine with the Spitfire Maxx and his with the Gobbler Getter.

    [video]http://www.bowhunting.com/videos/Season-2--2011/Episode-02-Turkey-Hunting-and-Food-Plots_1084[/video]
     

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