losing Easton Aftermath inserts ...

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by wannabe hunter, Apr 12, 2019.

  1. wannabe hunter

    wannabe hunter Weekend Warrior

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    I'm having some issues with Easton Aftermath arrows.
    Shot from a compound with about 54lbs, I tend to lose inserts + tip at a rate of 1 out of 20 shots approximately.
    Target is either a usual 3D foam animal, or a target backstop of similar material.

    I glue them the same way as other arrows I shoot with the same bows. These shafts are even cheaper, but I lose less then 1 insert/tip per 200 shots. They even have a small protruding rim at the insert, i.e. it has a slightly larger diameter then the shaft.

    Glueing procedure is as following:
    - cleaning insert and glue area of the shaft with alcohol (remove fat/dirt)
    - screw the tip into insert, and apply hot melt glue to the insert (near bottom)
    - heat insert + hot melt glue until glue begins to bubble
    - briefly warm up the shaft end simultaneously
    - put insert/tip in, wipe off excessive glue
    - set aside to cool down

    I tried cyan acrylate glue as well, but it made not much of a difference.

    Anyone having a suggestion what could be the problem, and how to make it "stick" ???

    Thanks.
     
  2. davidingle

    davidingle Weekend Warrior

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    Any particular reason you are using hot melt on carbon shafts? I just don't see that too often besides target guys who are changing tip weights without inserts.. I've used devcon 2 part epoxy for 3 years or so and not had an issue.
     
  3. wannabe hunter

    wannabe hunter Weekend Warrior

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    I used hot melt glue for my wood arrows, usually with parallel screw-on tips. Never lost a tip that way.
    I then tried with my target arrows for the compound, that works too. Only the Easton Aftermath seem to make a problem.
    But thanks for the hint, I try epoxy. Have some anyway, I use it for conical tips on bamboo arrows.
     
  4. davidingle

    davidingle Weekend Warrior

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    Gotcha, yeah thats interesting that you're losing tips on just the Aftermaths. Back when I worked at an Easton dealer those were by far the best selling arrows and I can't think of any instances where they lost inserts maybe 1 or 2 but that had to have been out of thousands that we sold. You could try roughing up the inside of the shafts with a wire drill brush to get some grit for the glue to grab against, I always did that with hit inserts.
     
  5. wannabe hunter

    wannabe hunter Weekend Warrior

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    Might be true, I will try to roughen the inside next time. Think I have some extra length anyway, so I can cut off the "hot melt polluted" front.
    The Aftermath seem to have a smoother surface than other arrows. Especially the one's I use for target shooting.
    Not sure it it's the "nano finish" or so some manufacturers advertise. Such arrows are robably easy to pull out - including the insert ...

    I started compound about a year ago, and tried the arrow-making methods proven to work for recurves.
    Which seems a bit naive, there is a bit more energy involved.
    E.g., I learned to never ever shoot with a compound at compressed straw targets below freezing point. The energy of the arrow melts up the ice, and it freezes again in a few seconds. Almost impossible to get out.
     
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  6. Mod-it

    Mod-it Newb

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    I never had any luck with the hot melt glue, tried it years ago when I first started shooting (aluminum arrows back then). I mentioned it to a local pro shop guy at the time and he told me he has always glued his inserts in with fletching glue and to give it a try. I've used it ever since, 20+ years now, and it is a rare occurrence for an insert to pull out. All I do is give the inside a swab with a Q-tip dipped in alcohol, make sure it has evaporated, and then put 3 lines of fletchtite evenly spaced on the insert length wise and then push it in and give it a 1/4 turn twist. Wipe the excess fletchtite off right away, and give the arrows a day before using them.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2019
  7. wannabe hunter

    wannabe hunter Weekend Warrior

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    Hot melt works fine for parallel screw-on tips (wood arrows).
    I sed to to as well.

    Sounds o.k., I can get such glue (e.g. Bohning fletch tite) for areasonable price here in Europe.
    The distributor says "5 minutes clamp time" and "48h cure time", sounds not like cyan acrylate instant glue.
     
  8. John T.

    John T. Weekend Warrior

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    Devcon 2 Ton epoxy. I used it to build golf clubs. If it can take a full golf swing, it will hold an insert. FWIW, I use it for points and nock inserts for NASP arrows.
    Hot melt is/was used to install the tip top guide for fishing rods. However...if left in a hot vehicle, the hot melt gets too hot and the guide comes off, usually when fighting a fish. I went to CA for that guide.
     
  9. wannabe hunter

    wannabe hunter Weekend Warrior

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    I think I go with the epoxy first, I have some anyway. One hour pot time, and one day cure time. I don't really trust all this quick-curing stuff.

    BTW, epoxy glueing can be reversed with heat, too.
    I use epoxy for the conical tips on my bamboo arrows. Heating the tip about the same was as with hot melt, I can pull off the tip easily.
    Can't remember losing such a tip, though.
    This might be not the same thing - a 50# compound puts about three times as much energy into an arrow, compared to a 35# recurve/horsebow. The strain on the tip (heating at entry) is accordingly.
     
  10. wannabe hunter

    wannabe hunter Weekend Warrior

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    Pays off to take a closer look sometimes.
    Silly me didn't realize I used the Aftermath shafts with the smallest diameter (400). Having tips with a 1mm larger diameter puts some extra stress on the insert when pulling out.
    Getting proper sized tips would surely help, too ...
     

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