Learning to Hunt whitetails.

Discussion in 'Whitetail Deer Hunting' started by grizzly1530, Jul 12, 2013.

  1. grizzly1530

    grizzly1530 Weekend Warrior

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    I have a question for everyone. Everyone here is so knowledgable on whitetails, like their feeding patterns, bedding areas, most used trails during different times of the year. I am new to bowhunting, this will be my first year, I have always whitetail hunted with a gun and had success, but I never actually truly Hunted the animal. What I mean by this, is I never learned patterns, tendencies, anything like that, I basically went out to the stand, and shot the deer that came by. Now I actually want to learn about whitetails, where to put stands, how to hunt them, how to identify bedding areas, how to identify food sources, all of that stuff.

    My question is, how did you guys learn? I know there are books out there, and I have read some magazines on the subject, but a lot of the time, I don't really understand what they are trying to say. Does anyone have a specific book on how to identify these areas, and what to look for?
     
  2. Whitetail_Widowmaker

    Whitetail_Widowmaker Weekend Warrior

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    I was and still am fortunate enough to have my dads 40 years experience to teach me how to hunt whitetails when I was younger and I learned a great deal from "on the job training". A great book I have heard the guys on the site talk about is Pastor Bill Vales book and you can find it on his website, Pressured Deer - Bowhunting Strategies and Tips for Shooting Mature Whitetail Deer | Intense Strategies for Hunting Pressured Trophy Whitetails. But to be honest the absolute best way to learn where to find bedding areas, funnels, feedings areas, pinch points, all their little tendencies because not one deer is the same and where to put stands is to actually get in the woods and spend some real time out there scouting cause you can't do that in a book.
     
  3. grizzly1530

    grizzly1530 Weekend Warrior

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    Right, yeah, I have been spending more time in the woods lately scouting, but my issue is, I don't know how to identify those areas. I'm looking more for books or articles on how to identify those areas, rather than strategies on hunting them. I would imagine some of that would come from experience in identifying those areas.
     
  4. frenchbritt123

    frenchbritt123 Grizzled Veteran

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    My father taught me everything.
     
  5. Meat Hunter

    Meat Hunter Weekend Warrior

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    what does the area you plan to hunt look like? hardwoods, pines, swamps? Where im at it has been clear cut over the years, I look for hard woods turning into pines with thick cover running between them, small groves of younger poplar or aspen trees. Doe runs in some places here tend to have buck runs within 40 yards of them, the doe runs will be beat down, bucks not as much. If you can drive in the areas your going to hunt, old logging roads, etc., then do that in prime time, keep seeing deer get out and move back into the woods where they are crossing. This is my 3rd season, I've had to learn on my own, for sure only way is to get out and look, old rubs with doe trails is my focus this year. Good luck
     
  6. AUbowhunter

    AUbowhunter Weekend Warrior

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    My dad taught me alot but he was mostly a rabbit hunter, and rifle for deer. I learned alot by inviting older guys with me on scouting trips or hunts. The experience they have is priceless. Also I read everything I can, still no school like getting into the woods and walking around. Find thick stuff and trudge through it. Good luck.
     
  7. Hoyt_Archer

    Hoyt_Archer Weekend Warrior

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    Trial and error thru the years..Read everything you can, Listen to what others have to say,Watch from afar,Observe actions and reactions to different situations.Keep a log that you can go back on from time to time to refresh yourself.Deer arent that hard to figure out..They eat, sleep, drink, breed, and have babies. Find the locale for each and the trails they use and your half way there.The other half is a little harder getting in range for a shot..Morning stands,Night stands,Different wind directions etc etc..
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2013
  8. uncljohn

    uncljohn Weekend Warrior

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  9. Chago

    Chago Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Ya my learning was self learning from making mistakes. I post questions on forums like this to get people's opinions.

    Realistically the more your in the woods the more you learn. My first season I learned about finding bedding and feeding. But I also learned about scent lol cause I never saw any deer cause I was looking so hard for there beds lol.

    Tons of stuff online, tons of stuff on forums. Watch hunting shows, go out and make mistakes. It's like any sport no book will make you good. Only practice.
     
  10. MBrauer

    MBrauer Weekend Warrior

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