Is it too far fetched for me to go hunting ?

Discussion in 'Intro to Bowhunting & Archery' started by frankgtrs, Feb 25, 2015.

  1. frankgtrs

    frankgtrs Newb

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2015
    Posts:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Hello
    So I'm interested in hunting with a bow sometime in the upcoming years, the reason I don't have a date is because I'm a complete beginner to even shooting a bow and have never done any hunting at all.
    I'm learning as much as I can from the internet as I don't even know anyone who hunts.
    My question is it too far fetched for me to go hunting with bow ? do you think I will even find deer in the first few years by myself ?
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. nontypical223

    nontypical223 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2015
    Posts:
    179
    Likes Received:
    28
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    TN
    Where will you be hunting? Yes you can get started and hunt this year if can get everything you need. Shooting a bow is not that hard. Do you have a pro shop near by? If so go visit they should be able to get you started.
     
  3. frankgtrs

    frankgtrs Newb

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2015
    Posts:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    New York, and or surrounding public lands. There's at least one archery shop with a nice range. Which is where I've been shooting just for fun. (I live in a tiny NYC apartment).
     
  4. Lady Liberty

    Lady Liberty Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2014
    Posts:
    211
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    YES! Absolutely! What you need is the right help. The most critical issue is getting set up with your bow from the start. DO NOT try to set yourself up with what you are learning online. A Pro Shop with a good reputation is a MUST. I got set up with my compound bow in February last year and killed two doe this past fall. It's totally possible! Just find the right shop and then the right bow for YOU.

    Next, hunting... Hmmm... I know nothing about New York. Here are a few suggestions:

    1.) get to know your local Game Warden/WCO. When hunting public land, they can be invaluable. Review your regs as soon as they come out and if you have questions, it's best to get clarification "from the horses mouth"--the WCO in whose jurisdiction you will be hunting.

    2.) you may not have relatives that hunt, but do they live where you could knock doors and ask permission to hunt (i.e. another state like OH or PA, etc.)

    3.) you are going to need a mentor or someone to help teach you about the woods. Seeing it on TV is vastly different from actually being there and reading sign. Also, there is tracking and gutting, etc. Now for this one, maybe someone else will have some advice. Joining a local Sportsman's Club, maybe take a Hunter's Safety Course (who knows who you might meet)...

    If you have some support, it's easier to stick with something because you won't feel frustrated as you muddle through it. However, just being in the woods is an adventure --and, it is ADDICTING!

    Welcome to the hunt!
     
  5. Bryan Jeffrey

    Bryan Jeffrey Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2015
    Posts:
    618
    Likes Received:
    1
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Crestline, California, United States
    The very first time i went hunting. i walked within 50 yards of a couple deer. and i wasnt even looking for deer. all i had been doing before that is reading. go for it bro
     
  6. frankgtrs

    frankgtrs Newb

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2015
    Posts:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Thank you, Im not too worried about getting set up. I know the shop would do it for me or I'd ask my dad he's a competition shooter.
    1.) Thank you, will do.
    2.) No all of my family lives in the city.
    3.) That's what I was a bit worried about, hunting seems like the kind of activity where you definitely need some guidance.
     
  7. Lady Liberty

    Lady Liberty Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2014
    Posts:
    211
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    That's fantastic about both the shop and your Dad. That in my opinion is the hardest part.

    The reason I mention the WCO, is because I went on a public land bear hunt a few years back and in the process of trying to verify what was required of me IF I took a bear in the archery season, I discovered even the game commission had a hard time understanding all the regs. So I eventually ended up speaking directly with the WCO in charge of the land I'd be hunting. As we talked and ironed out my responsibilities, we got to talking about the mountain...and low and behold he told me exactly where they released nuisance bears. His guidance was invaluable. Not all officers are that helpful, but sometimes you get a great one.

    Like I said, join a hunter's safety program, or your local NWTF chapter perhaps... you may even meet someone in the bow shop, barber shop, etc. who you hit it off with and you can pick their brain. My favorite is the old-timers... boy do they have stories and wisdom to share!!!

    Doing on your own is not impossible though... if you have questions, there are folks on here who process a wealth of knowledge and are more than willing to take the time and share it! I learned how to successfully create my turkey hunting set up from an online forum where the guys told me what to do. There are also other venues like Facebook, Youtube, and animal specific forums, books, videos and TV.

    The only downside I can see is that you actually live in the city. I live in the country and I trip over hunters. If my husband didn't hunt, it's a safe bet like 97% of my neighbors do...

    If you have specific questions, just start a new thread and I'm sure the folks will rise to the occasion. Who knows, one of us may know someone in your area.
     
  8. Lady Liberty

    Lady Liberty Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2014
    Posts:
    211
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    I just thought I'd throw this out there... everything I learned about turkey hunting (before I hit the woods the first year) I learned off of videos, TV and online forums. --and that first season was a smashing success! Our family didn't know a soul that hunted turkey. Now, we've been successfully hunting for 3 spring gobbler seasons. The first year, I took this gobbler with me son. The next year he took his father hunting and they each got their first. Last year they got another double. In 3 years we've taken 6 gobblers...

    It can be done.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Spear

    Spear Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2012
    Posts:
    4,018
    Likes Received:
    82
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Cincinnati, OH
    First I would recommend doing a lot of research, and I don't just mean on the Internet. Learn about deer, their habitat, their anatomy, their way of life, their food, their needs, everything you can. Second, go to a bow shop (not some big outdoors store) when it's not busy and really spend time with someone who can help you find a bow, properly measure your draw length, draw weight, help you select arrows, cut the arrows, paper tune it (sighting it in). Have them show you proper form and make sure you can repeat it over and over. Start pulling back the bow and holding your form. Once you are comfortable, begin target practicing with said bow, and do not stop. Practice all year long, at 20 yards, 30 yards, and 40 yards. Don't overshoot to where you compensate and learn bad habits, you may only need to shoot 10 arrows a day, but make sure to keep doing it. Then you will need to get some gear, there's plenty of advice and hand-me-downs you can probably find. Next I would decide if you want to hunt public land or private land. If you know someone with property, ask them if you can hunt it. If you don't, go to the local game commission or find a hunting club. You may even resort to going door to door to find a place to hunt private property. Be polite and don't rush them into giving an answer on the spot, so have a piece of paper with your information on it. Scout the land you intend to hunt, a ground blind may be a good place to start for your first year to take the tree stand out of the equation until you feel comfotable hunting in general. Also make sure to read your local hunting laws and regulations. Know what to do if and when you do kill a deer; how to field dress it, how to drag it, where to take it to process it or know how to process it yourself, make sure to understand how to care for the meat.

    There is a lot to learn, but hunting by this coming fall is not out of the question if you get started now. Research, practice, rinse, repeat.
     
  10. flip665

    flip665 Newb

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2015
    Posts:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    i know it was mentioned earlier but hunters safety is a MUST... cant get a tag without it... get looking now because it may not be offered at a convenient time or place... dont count out the private land or haveing to ask, i've asked a bunch, been told no thank you a bunch but i do have permission to hunt a lot of different places now that are little to no pressure...(unlike some public lands) dont forget the written permission, makes life easier if you get a visit from the conservation officer and in some cases is the law.
    hunters safety hunters safety hunters safety.... now... dont wait till its too late... have a blast, and good luck...
     
  11. I8myTarget

    I8myTarget Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2015
    Posts:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    well if you were closer I would suggest we meet up. I can put you on some and give you some advise but I am in Arkansas so.... my suggestion is find a 3D range in your area. Go and shoot as much as you can and talk with people. You can learn a lot from others and you might just find a new friend that can show you the ropes. Just remember its called HUNTING not killing. dont get disappointed if it don't happen right off the bat.
     
  12. Simplicity

    Simplicity Newb

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2013
    Posts:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    The Midwest
    Getting set up has got to be the most important part of bowhunting (besides the licenses and tags). As long as you get those few things knocked out, find land that you have permission to hunt that you know has deer in the area and hunt it. My first times out hunting I went out on public land and ran into deer even when I still was very new and clueless about bowhunting.

    Once you see your first deer in the woods while bowhunting, you'll never leave it. It's a experience that is truly amazing.
     
  13. jeremy421

    jeremy421 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2014
    Posts:
    125
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    perfect practice makes perfect
     
  14. doublehelix8

    doublehelix8 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2015
    Posts:
    125
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kentucky
    Of course you can go bowhunting! I recently started bow hunting3 years ago. I also didn't have many people in my family to ask questions. My dad gun hunts but could offer no advice on bowhunting. I never liked gun hunting as a kid but when I picked up a bow the game changed. I can offer you advice that helped me greatly:
    1.) Get your bow tuned properly at your local archery shop.
    2.) Do your research online and ask other hunters at your archery shop.
    3.) For me spending a little extra cash on a micro-tune sight made things A LOT easier.
    4.) Proper form is everything.
    5.) If you plan on hunting elevated practice from an elevated position.
    6.) Ask local people if you can hunt on their land. Some people would like some does to be taken out.
    7.) Don't get discouraged if you can only shoot 20-25 yard your first year. I went hunting 18 morn/afternoon hunts before I got my first doe. When I did I have never felt more accomplished. After 3 years I now feel comfortable up to 35 yard kill shots.
    8.) I watched all the bowhunting videos I could find. Bow Hunt or Die helped a lot.
    9.) Enjoy the hunt for all that it is.
     

Share This Page