Instinctive or not

Discussion in 'Traditional Archery' started by RyanW, Jan 4, 2018.

  1. RyanW

    RyanW Weekend Warrior

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    I was just curious how many of you shoot instinctively vs sighting down the shaft or some other aiming method? I have been shooting my recurve in the summer and I'm not very consistent. I learned to shoot instinctively with a recurve when I was young (6-9 or 10). I switched to a compound at 10 or 11, so its been a while since I've done a lot of instinctive shooting. I'm thinking I just need to stick with instinctive shooting and in 8 or 10 thousand shots I'll regain my form?
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2018
  2. woodsman

    woodsman Weekend Warrior

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    I focus on a spot and when I am at full draw the arrow will be pointed at the target. I think regardless of how you decide to aim, as your form improves so will your shooting..
    Chris
     
  3. sam beerman

    sam beerman Newb

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    Ive found with instinctive archery i need to shoot every day in order to stay accurate. Practicing with the same anchor point and same form is key, your mind will make minor adjustments in aim as you practice.
     
  4. RyanW

    RyanW Weekend Warrior

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    Thanks, the replies make a lot of sense.
     
  5. varmint101

    varmint101 Newb

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    I shoot without using the arrow as a reference however I do see it in my vision. Not sure if I split it or not as I just focus on a spot within the spot and do it. I've found that good form and repeatability no matter how you're shooting is what will help you. You have to use the same anchor point every time, extend and pull through every time. If you have a floating/moving anchor or weak bow arm it just won't work consistently. That was my biggest problem was an inconsistent anchor. Whatever your shooting method you try you need to stick with it at least a few weeks to truly get a feel if it is going to work or not. All my opinion of course and there are a lot of them! I tell ya if you're building from the ground up right now or just looking to do something else I'd look into The Push on YouTube and they have a great podcast as well. Matt Z. can shoot and knows what he's talking about.
     
  6. Cottontop

    Cottontop Weekend Warrior

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    Becoming a proficient shot with a stick bow requires a lot more commitment then any other type of bow. That being said, proper form and knowing how to correct your flaws is the difference between shooting sessions ending on a successful note or total frustration. If you have the time, look for some of the better books or programs to help start your own training program. Begin with your target at 10 yards and practice proper draw, anchor and release. When you get really tight groups move back 10 yards.
     
  7. RyanW

    RyanW Weekend Warrior

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    I don't think having a consistent anchor will be a problem. I always shot two under one over as a kid and anchored with the tip of my index finger in the corner of my mouth. The first time I drew a recurve last year I did the same without thinking and the anchor point felt like "home". My ability to hit where I look didn't weather as well. As far as properly drawing a bow........I have no idea what that means.
     
  8. JoeFranchise24

    JoeFranchise24 Newb

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    Over the course of a year I tried it all and I have to say much of where you find the most comfort and accuracy as a shooter depends entirely on the individual and type of activity in which you are participating.

    From shooting with a tab or a glove, split finger to three under, crawling down the string or a fixed crawl, it is all dependent on what is most comfortable, repeatable and even economical to you.

    Consider what your goals may be. Are you shooting just for fun, going to be hunting with traditional archery equipment or participating in competition archery? In my opinion there is a high probability the method in which you shoot will be impacted by the activities you participate in.

    For hunting I choose a fixed crawl and a glove (the glove is just a personal preference and easier in the woods than a tab). For league I shoot a crawl and a tab. And in the back yard, based on the two types of archery I participate in (hunting and league), I practice both with the glove and fixed crawl (primarily - as I am a hunter first and foremost) and some with the tab (to make sure I am proficient for league) and crawl to my intended distance.

    Watch the push, the in depth sentiments I could continue to share with you today can all be seen in this very well put together video.



    Hope this helps,
    Joe
     
  9. JoeFranchise24

    JoeFranchise24 Newb

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    Two very detailed aspects of becoming a proficient, accurate and precise traditional archer;

    1) To become a proficient traditional archer you need a RAT (this video is not the first place I heard this saying)
    - Repeatable shot sequence
    - Aiming system
    - Tuned Bow
    Indulge in to the intricacies of these three aspects, learn to master them, and you will undoubtedly become a much improved traditional archer

    2) Confidence and mental toughness.

    Joe
     
  10. RyanW

    RyanW Weekend Warrior

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    Thanks Joe,

    I'll watch the push. As far as "aiming system", that sort of sounds like a recommendation NOT to shoot instinctive?
     
  11. Bowsage

    Bowsage Weekend Warrior

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    Interesting... doesn't mention practice. I've had several sessions with a coach who has taught Olympians and hunters. He never has encouraged me to shoot a certain way. He allowed me to develop a certain style of my own . If I want to learn other methods he's able to help with that. Basically , I shoot what works for me, that's what he encouraged. He'll tweak what he sees necessary.
     
  12. woodsman

    woodsman Weekend Warrior

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    Agree with Bowsage.. Use your aim method, you deserve the opportunity to shoot your way. If it works great, if not.. well at least you gave it a shot. Over time you will develop a style that works for you. What you "want to do" with your bow will have a big influence on "how you choose to do it".

    Chris
     
  13. JoeFranchise24

    JoeFranchise24 Newb

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    As Bowsage and woodsman said, shoot what works for you. Go through the methods, instinctive may or may not feel natural and thus may or may not work best for you.

    As an example when I first picked up a longbow, nearly a year ago now, I began shooting instinctive and over the course of a few months just could not find the comfort and consistency (accuracy/precision in combination with form/repeatability, etc.) I was looking for; you may find the exact opposite. After trying instinctive I adapted and began to experiment with other shooting forms, giving each their due diligence, until I was finally comfortable, accurate and precise enough to adopt the shooting forms I use today.

    With that being said, I am still tweaking and adapting my shooting style/s to try and become the most accurate and precise archer that my ability and equipment will allow.

    One last sentiment. I shot a doe this past fall, from the ground at 10ft in a ghillie suit, with my longbow. The circumstances of the situation only afforded my the opportunity to shoot completely instinctual.

    Joe
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2018
  14. Cottontop

    Cottontop Weekend Warrior

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    Unfortunately, most who have shot a compound for any amount of time will refer to it while shooting a stick bow. Your " aiming system" when shooting instinctive takes a considerable amount of time to develop ( six months to a year is a drop in the bucket). I started hunting with a recurve when I was 14. We used a matchbook cover stuck to a tightly bound hay bale as kids. As soon as you were in and around the match book we would move back a few yards. I have bounced back and forth between recurves and longbows for over 47 years. When I don't shoot for extended periods of time, everything falls apart and the retraining starts all over. Its all good and all fun, don't get frustrated the first time you don't shoot a tennis ball size group at a given yardage. Get a little closer to the target and examine what you are doing. Keep a couple of bare shafts in with your regular arrows and mix up the arrow on each set. After a while you will be able to tell when you are getting tired just by the flight of the bare shafts.
     

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