Impact difference from the stand to target and the ground to the target

Discussion in 'Bowhunting Talk' started by Trator17, Dec 10, 2016.

  1. mobowdoebuck

    mobowdoebuck Weekend Warrior

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    The Pythagorean theory. As an engineer went through the physics and determined it jus did not matter. First a deer is about 15-18" wide with 6" -8" vitals with a bow. 6/18= 1 to 3 slope.
    This is a 15' stand with a deer 15 yards from the tree. A=15 B=5
    actual flight will be (15*15+5*5)^.5 = 15.8 yards. In actuality the effect is between 15 and 15.8 probable closer to 15. But I don't have care if it is 15 or 16..
    At 40 yards you get 40 vs 40.3. You only get a difference if you are like 30 feet high shooting at a deer 10 yards away. You get 14 vs 10. At that angle you are in single lung city.
    You need to shoot to verify, the other issue you aim is above the arrow. Sometimes that can do some things. I would need a picture to explain this. It is usually very small at slopes less than 1-3.


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  2. Trator17

    Trator17 Newb

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    Ok
    I never had physics class using that theory (that is if my memory serves me well, it's been a while since high school)
    That helped a lot on understanding that part

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  3. kurveball18

    kurveball18 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Yes, most cases you will be about an inch high from what i've seen. And bending at the waist as others have mentioned will keep things consistent.
     
  4. mikido

    mikido Weekend Warrior

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    You can see an inch from the stand?
     
  5. copperhead

    copperhead Grizzled Veteran

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    By not bending at the waist you can your form. Changing your form will cause you to anchor different and will ultimately can the impact of the arrow. Others have had said this as well. Elkguide said it best, its better to shoot it and see for yourself.
     
  6. Riverduck11

    Riverduck11 Weekend Warrior

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  7. Bowsage

    Bowsage Weekend Warrior

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  8. Trator17

    Trator17 Newb

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    I agree to Bowsage, that website hit straight to the point

    I'll use it as a quick reference point when I get to practice, then fine tune from there

    Again, you all have helped tremendously

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  9. Trator17

    Trator17 Newb

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  10. mobowdoebuck

    mobowdoebuck Weekend Warrior

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    I want to say at shallow angles this is close enough, however at steeper angles it is not correct for 3 reasons.
    1. Arrows do not maintain a constant speed. The drop between 20-30 yards is smaller than the drop from 30-40 since wind resistance slows the arrow down. An arrow shot at an angle will be going slower and thus drop a little bit more. At shallow angles this is Almost zero. Shooting downhill this will be less. See point 2
    2. Gravity accelerates in the direction of the deer going downhill and decelerates going uphill. Simple case shooting uphill at 15 degrees 30 yards neglecting wind since it will effect both roughly the same. X= Xo+Vo*t-32.2*sin(angle)*t^2/2. Sin 15=.26 sin-15=.26going up you get, -4.186 t^2 +320 t-90=0 time uphill will be .2878 downhill will be .2783. The drop will be y=32.2 * cos(15) * t^2/2 this gives a 15.5 drop uphill and a 14.5 inch drop downhill. If you had a 45 degree angle it would be bigger than one inch.
    3. Your aim is not with the arrow and the angle of the target changes. Most rifle ballistics ask for scope height for example. This will vary depending on set up and to be honest I would have to draw it out.



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  11. Trator17

    Trator17 Newb

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