if your were just starting out

Discussion in 'Equipment Reviews' started by Kansasbuck, Dec 16, 2012.

  1. Kansasbuck

    Kansasbuck Weekend Warrior

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    there are always threads about what to buy as far as a new bow. I have my favorite, a mathews, and I'm sure most of you have your choices. I have a friend that might start up bow hunting, and my question is: what would you stay away from if you are just starting out?

    Thanks for any input
     
  2. SCHLOTTERBECK

    SCHLOTTERBECK Newb

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    Anything not made in USA...................
     
  3. mobow

    mobow Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Anything cheap. Don't confuse that with me saying to buy expensive. That's not what I mean. Set a price limit, whatever that is, and stick with it. There is a big difference between cheap and inexpensive. Stay away from cheap.
     
  4. frantic29

    frantic29 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    This might peeve off some people here but a lot of the Mission stuff is coming out now with plastic limb pockets so I would stay far far away from Mission unless its one of the versions with metal limb pockets. Not sure when they started doing that though. Would bet some other manufacturers are doing that as well so pay attention to materials. Really I don't think you can go wrong with any manufacturer. They all have their pros and cons. With the quality and performance of modern bows I don't think anybody can afford to produce a bow thats just complete crap. But do pay attention to what Mobow said. Don't confuse cheap and inexpensive.

    I also like to stay away from plastic on sights as well. They stick out there and when it gets super cold I don't know how well plastic sight would take a hit against a tree on the way up to a stand. Remember the rest and release are the two most important things in your set up. You can aim with a toothpick superglued on if you have too but if the rest doesn't work properly and you can't get a smooth release then your not going to hit what your aiming at.
     
  5. BearBownsLegion

    BearBownsLegion Newb

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    Bear makes great starter compounds for amazing prices. I started with a Bear and thats all I'll ever shoot. Good luck!
     
  6. Afflicted

    Afflicted Grizzled Veteran

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    Duel cams and high poundage.

    That what I did and love it now but it's not the easiest way to get good. Not very forgiving.
     
  7. trial153

    trial153 Grizzled Veteran

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    For a first bow, I would help getting fitted...draw length ect. From that point I would go with something a couple years old from a shop..or a full set up from a place like AT classifieds. You can get a top model that is couple years old fully rigged for about 300ish. Some advice, for most normal sized men..stay within a few guideline..33- 38 Ata, 7 plus brace hight.. too start.
    The conventual advice is go shoot a bunch of bows till you find the one that you like..or it jumps out at you is a bunch of crap for a new shooter. When you have no experience to draw on your wasting time and building on an empty footing....get something simple and inexpensive to start with use it and start developing you likes and dislikes in a meaningful way...experience. Then after a few hundred arrows and season or two you will have some experience to draw upon ...and then if you feel you want to stay with it..maybe consider upgrading at that time.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  8. Pro V1

    Pro V1 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Crossbows! ;)
     
  9. Pearce92

    Pearce92 Weekend Warrior

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    not bashing or anything so dont take this the wrong way but i have heard a few people say that they didnt like the plasic limb pockets, why? i have not saw or heard from any of them that has had a pocket break, crack, or warp? so if there is no suport to saying the plastic pockets are bad then why do you say to stay far away from them?
     
  10. chart33

    chart33 Weekend Warrior

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    I got my first bow 3 years ago and got a Bear bow. It was perfect for just starting out. The mistake I made was buying a ready to hunt package. I ended up replacing all the "cheap" accessories it came with after 2 months. I'd stick with buying a bare bow then buy accessories separately.
     
  11. Sticknstringarchery

    Sticknstringarchery Grizzled Veteran

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    I wish I had someone who knew a thing or two about archery when I started.

    The first thing I would do is find a good pro shop. Stay out I the box stores. Once a shop is found go and get measured and let the techs help with showing what proper form is and shoot some bows. Have a price range set and shoot everything a man/woman can get their hands on. I would even say shoot a couple flagship bows so you get a feel for what the difference is in a high end and low end bow. More than likely a new shooter really won't be able to tell the difference. Try both single and binary cam bows. Then pick one and buy it set up for the buyer. Then take pointers and lessons from an experienced archer that knows what they are doing. Then practice and practice properly.

    As far as bows, there isn't really many out there other than things like the box store brands to stay away from. I would highly suggest shooting the Quest Torrent and the BowTech Assassin. One that is overlooked is Parker. They make really good bows for the price!
    Good luck to your friend!
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2012
  12. KyleLewis

    KyleLewis Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Go to a pro shop and get a bow set up for you. Don't cheap out anywhere other wise you'll just buy the same parts again later.
     
  13. Pinnacle Archery

    Pinnacle Archery Weekend Warrior

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    Stay away from 70 lbs bows unless your a pretty big guy and pulling that weight is easy to control...for most it is not. 60lbs is more than enough to kill anything in North America.
     
  14. Pinnacle Archery

    Pinnacle Archery Weekend Warrior

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    Agreed!
     
  15. goodone

    goodone Weekend Warrior

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    It's all kneejerk Bullsh*t. They aren't made of plastic anyway. It's some kind of composite. It's the same stuff that has been used in pistols and has worked well for many years.

    I have a mission and you cannot beat the quality in that price range. There is nothing wrong with mission limb pockets. Great bows at a great price!
     
  16. Pearce92

    Pearce92 Weekend Warrior

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    thank you i have been looking for a answer for a long time because from someone who says to stay away from them or says there cheep and not quality made
     
  17. goodone

    goodone Weekend Warrior

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    You're welcome. I wouldn't hesitate to buy another mission bow, you'll be very happy with the ballistic I'm sure. I know I love my craze, the only thing I'm not thrilled about, is the grip but that's personal preference and can be changed.
     
  18. Pearce92

    Pearce92 Weekend Warrior

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    i have a focus grip ordered for it already when it comes in
     
  19. benwright22

    benwright22 Weekend Warrior

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    i could not disagree more.
     
  20. benwright22

    benwright22 Weekend Warrior

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    In all honesty if he knows he wants to get into it for the long run I would tell him to get good quality stuff. a mistake i made was getting more affordable eqipment (which was good at the time but i ended up having to replace it because i sacrificed quality). It may cost more but get a good bow (PSE (my favorite), mattews, hoyt, ect.), good arrows (I like beamon), and good arrow rest (QAD makes good ones)
     

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