How to lime/start a no till plot

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by johnmark, Jan 31, 2019.

  1. johnmark

    johnmark Newb

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    I am starting two .25 ac food plots in some hardwoods. I took a soil sample for each location. One came back with a 4.9ph and 4 tn/ac lime recommendation. The other area came back at 5.2 ph and 2 tn/ac lime recommendation. The soil sample paper states that if I am not turning/tilling the soil that I need to do 1tn/ac lime per year till the amount recommended is reached.

    If I only go spread 500lb of lime on each area, is there any hope for a successful plot this year? I was thinking a clover base with maybe some oats and rape.

    How should I approach this? I would like it ready by mid October this year.
     
  2. Okiebob

    Okiebob Grizzled Veteran

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    If you apply the lime and disc it in good you should be fine so long as you have a couple inches of rain over a couple months. You could even plant a summer plot of something like buckwheat.

    *Just noticed the no-till. I would say you may want to use liquid lime but.. my experience with liquid lime has never been a good one, it clogs spray tips, you need a agitator in the tank, just a total pain in the ass. I would suggest dragging a steel tooth harrow over the plot before and after if using a disc is not an option. Whatever you do stay away from a liquid lime with a picture of a deer on it, total junk.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2019
  3. copperhead

    copperhead Grizzled Veteran

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    I had a similar situation and what I did was drop the lime as soon as I could in the year. Here that was in February. The colder temperatures and soil freezing and thawing will help roll the lime into the soil. If you are still covered in snow that of course won't work. I'd say get your lime in the soil as soon as you can and then plant a seed that is pH tolerant and shade tolerant. In the woods your biggest problem is going to be leaf litter in the fall. You have to keep that off the plot or it will smother it out. You can also choose to prep and clean your plot through the summer and then put down seed in the fall. That should be plenty of time for the lime to be absorbed. Liquid lime is faster to absorb if you can find it but doing something is better than nothing. Also remember Rome wasn't build in a day. A plot is something that you can continually improve. Start it now and add lime over time till you get it in prime shape. Start with pH tolerant seed and see what works best for you and that your herd like. Then adjust blend as the soil improves. Good luck and keep us posted. If you have more questions ping me and I can tell you more about my failures and successes.
     

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