How important is arrow length?

Discussion in 'Bowhunting Talk' started by kv486612, Dec 29, 2016.

  1. mikido

    mikido Weekend Warrior

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    Again, how does arrow length affect left/right accuracy?
     
  2. Arkyinks

    Arkyinks Weekend Warrior

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    The effect is a fine tuning of spine. With carbon shafts it seems more important and you can improve accuracy by bare shaft tuning the shafts to the bow. Sometimes it is amazing how much difference it can make... often it is why people shoot mechanicals to cover up poor shaft spine.

    Also the extra inch will adjust the FOC and change flight characteristics. Back in the day when we shot cedar shafts with fingers our quivers were full of shafts with different lengths. This was how we fine tuned spine by bare shaft tuning. Aluminum shafts showed a smaller variance but it was there. Carbon shafts seem to be more sensitive to FOC and spine. Some times 1/2 inch can improve grouping as well as bh and fp flight.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2016
  3. Planopurist

    Planopurist Weekend Warrior

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    It depends how much inconsistency you can tolerate. Let them know what happened then shoot a few groups of both arrows mixed. The two lengths may group together at short distance, but will likely spread with distance. I would take an old arrow to the shop and have him match those.

    Depending on the glue he used, he should be able to get the insert out via a few different methods.

    Short of that, you could also cut the excess off the back end and refletch them if necessary.


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  4. Holt

    Holt Grizzled Veteran

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    It is affected by a arrow that its spine is to strong or weak for your bow. It can make a arrow fly left or right. The longer a arrow is the weaker the spine.
     
  5. WELDO

    WELDO Weekend Warrior

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    I would take them back to the guy that made.the mistake and have him make them right ! I agree that being slightly longer isn't going to be a drastic change but it's not what you wanted :bhod:
     
  6. rick-florida

    rick-florida Weekend Warrior

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    I use relatively short arrows, 26 and 27 inches and haven't noticed any difference between those two lengths out to 40 yards. One advantage to keeping those arrows 1 inch longer is if you later decide to change the weight or FOC of your arrow you have the room to cut off the current insert and replace it with one that is lighter or heavier.
     
  7. rick-florida

    rick-florida Weekend Warrior

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    for some reason I can't edit my above post to add that if the longer length flies OK for you, then one benefit of leaving them one inch longer is the ability to change the insert at a later date.
     
  8. mikido

    mikido Weekend Warrior

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    What are you talking about. Answer my question with physics please. An arrow only goes the direction it's pushed. Where is the left/right force coming from?


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  9. purebowhunting

    purebowhunting Die Hard Bowhunter

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    How did you determine your arrow length when you told them the length to cut them? The length is generally measured from the valley of the nock to the end of the arrow. Confirm he did cut them improperly before accusing him of a mistake. If you gave them an arrow or told them the proper measurement then it's his mistake and a fairly simple fix, they can cut off the nock end and refletch.
     
  10. Planopurist

    Planopurist Weekend Warrior

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    The arrow does not go the direction it's pushed. The arrow flexes back and forth at the time that it is released, aka "Archer's Paradox". This movement is dependent on several related factors, including spine. Arrow length has a relative effect on spine because longer arrows weigh more and change the center of gravity thereby changing dynamics of arrow flexibility at the release. This will cause different flight characteristics and subsequent impact points (left, right, high, low, whatever) between your two arrow lengths. Now, whether or not that is noticeable with your skill level or out to the distances you plan to shoot is another matter, perhaps negligibly relevant. Nonetheless, that's what is happening.


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    Last edited: Jan 2, 2017
  11. mikido

    mikido Weekend Warrior

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    I understand what/why archers paradox. The arrow has stopped doing that before it hits the target correct?
     
  12. Planopurist

    Planopurist Weekend Warrior

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    The paradox can be more or less over by the time the arrow reaches the target depending on how far away the target is and whether the arrow is stabilized well enough by fletching/vane geometry and configuration. Of course, this assumes proper spine selection anyway.


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  13. Invisible man

    Invisible man Weekend Warrior

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    To me its very important. You cant have different sized arrows. I would go back and make them fix it or replace them with the right ones.
     
  14. Arkyinks

    Arkyinks Weekend Warrior

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    I have seen slow motion videos of arrow flight and while the "wobble " may settle down it is often still there at 40 yards. Having a well tuned bow and arrow will reduce it as much as possible. If your FOC is off you will get a yaw effect in flight. Add a fixed broadhead the yaw effect is magnified.

    It just takes a little time to bareshaft tune but can make a world of difference.
     

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