Heavy Arrow Setup

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by frankmcd, Nov 12, 2020.

  1. mt fighter

    mt fighter Weekend Warrior

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    Unfortunately most of the deer I haven’t recovered I don’t know exactly where I hit and if it was a bad hit etc. the one this year for example was strange. Pass thru with rage. Very little blood on arrow. Pretty solid blood in track for a while. Found a bed with blood (we should’ve pulled out but didn’t long story) and eventually blood dried up. Checked next day also but no luck. Not saying setup would’ve made a difference in that one, just simply saying I don’t know. Just looking to try something new because I know a couple times it would have made a difference.
     
  2. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

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    I'll dive in, but before I do I mean none of this to frustrate or hurt feelings - BUT I feel this is an issue many need to hear discussed or ask questions of as well.

    HOW DO YOU NOT KNOW WHERE YOU HIT OR IF IT WAS A BAD HIT?

    The underlined part of your statement is extremely concerning and is something I hear or see folks type far too often. Now I understand perhaps being a few inches off in your thought of impact, but to not know enough to suspect a bad hit or not means one of two things occurred:

    -You took a shot you shouldn't have....through a row or two of corn and guessed vitals...shot too far....shot with not enough light...shot a moving or running deer...

    -True craziness occurred....limb on bow cracked on shot, unseen tiny limb deflected throwing off your tracking for a moment....

    Sadly, I'd bank on 8 out 10 folks I hear say something similar is the first bullet point reason. This last year I had a guy openly admitting he shot a deer 3 rows deep in the corn when all he could see was the tail and the eyes/head of the deer - so he guessed where vitals were. Another this past year described a shot at 45 yards (he'd never shot over 30 prior) that he couldn't guess where he hit...why you ask? Because it was too dark to take the shot ethically as well.

    However, if you find yourself unable to know where a deer is impact and able to describe approximately location of impact (think softball size or so at least) you need to reconsider something about what you're doing.

    Few things I recommend:

    • If you are not shooting lighted nocks and they're legal THEY ARE WORTH IT. Now it's true if you don't get a passthrough, that nock sticking out can "lie" due to angles and movement as to where they broadhead hit, but for the most part MOST typical bowhunters run a set up to at least bury that fletch/nock arrow close to the entrance side hole - perfectly illustrating precisely where impact was at least.
    • SLOW DOWN. After the shot, sit down, close your eyes and slowly walk yourself through the shot sequence that just happened. The memory is fresh, but your adrenaline can jumble it all into a mess - force replay after replay, envision the squeeze of your release, picture the arrow flight and watch the arrow hit
    • Have pictures handy on your phone of deer broadside, quartering away head left, quartering away head right...all the options. What this does is allow you to visually show others and yourself where the area is of suspected impact....with that piece and the knowledge of how high you were in the tree (if in one) plus the angle of the deers body you can begin to envision the path that arrow took through that deer = priceless for making tracking decisions.
    • Learn the ability to read arrow blood and sign. Not all bloods are the same between what a lung or a muscle will put forth - research, learn and study every chance you get both in literature and also shots in real life.
    • Even if a deer you shoot is down, run through all this steps to guess where the entrance and exit is going to be when you get up to it. Learn the body language of a deer with different types of hits and keep a keen eye for those post-shot.
    Just a few quick thoughts thrown out there over my lunch hour.
     
  3. mt fighter

    mt fighter Weekend Warrior

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    I do shoot lighted nocks now and they’re amazing. The deer I shot this year was thirty yards clean pass thru. Maybe it’s just me but I have a general idea where it hit but I don’t know exactly where. It looked good. I swear I saw the deer stagger twice like it was about to fall. I expected to find it dead about 70 yards or less away. Turns out I didn’t. Like I said found good blood and a bed of blood and I know we should’ve pulled out then but either way it happens so fast I just can’t tell exactly where it hits. Maybe at ten yards, but twenty or thirty I find it hard. Maybe it’s just me. Maybe I need glasses. Idk lol
     
  4. afishhunter

    afishhunter Weekend Warrior

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    Oregon and Idaho both ban mechanucal broadheads?

    For my arrows, I pick the heaviest gr per inch I can find, after having them cut to length have them built with a minimum 100 grain insert and a 125 grain broadhead or field point*.

    (*I'd go heavier, but the pro shop didn't. Hard enough getting the heavy inserts ... they didn't normally stock them.)
     
  5. mt fighter

    mt fighter Weekend Warrior

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    Just ordered my new arrows. They’ll be about 594 grains, a little more once I add lighted nock. Worked with the guys from vector custom arrows and they were a ton of help. Arrows are set up for my exact bow and draw length and weight. Gonna have 105 grain ethics insert and I’m gonna shoot qad exodus 125 grain broadheads. Super excited to get these setup and shoot them.
     
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