Having some trouble with weight...

Discussion in 'Introductions - New User Forum' started by Yetzer2468, Mar 8, 2018.

  1. Yetzer2468

    Yetzer2468 Newb

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    Well long story short i got a Hoyt Defiant on a great deal with 60-70# limbs. I have the bow 8 turns down and i can pull it back 3-4 times and thats it. Should i just sell the bow and get a Bowtech Fuel so i can go lower weight or should i just keep conditioning until its comfortable. Im 20 and new to archery (well i used to shoot a lot when i was younger). Im afraid ill just lose interest again if its such a burden pulling the string back, but i absolutely love the bow :( Im not afraid to just keep conditioning my body (i am pretty weak for my age) but i feel like its going to take months before i can shoot my bow.
     
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  2. Aaron Jones

    Aaron Jones Weekend Warrior

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    Hey man, I am 23 and of average strength and it takes me some time every year to get reconditioned to pull it back. I saw you keep the bow and keep conditioning yourself!! Don’t give up man.
    This is what I would do, have you heard of the term blind bailing? It is where you stand maybe 3-4 feet away from the target and draw your bow, slightly aim to make sure you are on the target, then close your eyes and focus on form when you release the arrow. You can definitely look up exactly how to do it. It will help you with your form which will make you a better shot.
    I would do that every night before you go to bed if possible! You will see over a couple of weeks, 2 or 3; you will be able to pull your bow back more and more times over the course of the nights. But definitely don’t over do it. If three is the max then start there. The next night do another three. Maybe two nights later try 4-5. You will see that your strength will come with time while you work on form and consistency.


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  3. CoveyMaster

    CoveyMaster Grizzled Veteran

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    I think I've got some spare super soldier serum around here somewhere but I'm afraid it's quite useless without the vita-ray pod...If you can manage to find one of those around on ebay I can fix ya right up.

    Seriously though,
    I'd get a bow I could turn down enough to be comfortable and that fits you. With the right fit and a good matching weighted arrow, you can still kill deer just fine. In my opinion you're a lot safer drawing a bow that fits your natural strength. You can practice in increasing amounts with that and not damage your body or create bad habits, which trying to build yourself with an overweighted bow can cause shoulder and elbow damage as well as just bad habits like flinching, target panic and sky drawing.
     
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  4. dnoodles

    dnoodles Die Hard Bowhunter

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    2 schools of thought there...the way i see it is if you can pull it 4-5 times cold just getting into it you'll be OK w/ that bow. You're young enough that you should be able to condition your strength without too much strain. I would buy one of those safety releases that can't fire and draw as many times as you can when you wake up, repeat right before you go to work/school, then do again when you get home and before bed. You ought to be seeing significant improvements after 2 weeks or so. Shooting a bow uses muscles that don't get worked hard much for anything else. When I was only 14 I was pulling 75# and I was a scrawny little weakling- but I shot a ton. Probably plenty of grown men in pretty good shape but never pulled a bow before probably couldn't come close to pulling 75# back - just uses different muscles than most activities.

    Don't get discouraged- you'll get there.
     
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  5. Yetzer2468

    Yetzer2468 Newb

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    Thanks for the all reply's guys! :tu:
     
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  6. Blarney22

    Blarney22 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Do they sell 50-60lb limbs for that bow? Might be another option for you if you love the bow, just have a bow shop switch out the 60-70lb limbs for 50-60lb set
     
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  7. Yetzer2468

    Yetzer2468 Newb

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    yeah but they cost $300
     
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  8. Bowslinger2

    Bowslinger2 Newb

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    Uncle Ted says get a bow you can pull straight back with out straining your guts out. A Diamond Infinete bow adjusts from 5 lbs to 70 lbs pull weight . There is a ton of used ones for cheep money on line. Under $ 300.00 It's a darn nice shooting little bow and you can crank it up as you get stronger. I would highly recommend one. Keep the one you have, you might grow into it. Bow Hunting since 1987.. Good luck Bowslinger 2
     
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  9. w33kender

    w33kender Weekend Warrior

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    You need to be focused on form for the shot, imo, with complete comfort. Get lighter poundage, whether by mods or a new bow.
     

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