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Getting permission on private land

Discussion in 'Bowhunting Talk' started by John T., Nov 5, 2020.

  1. John T.

    John T. Die Hard Bowhunter

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    We are all familiar with the steps to gain permission on private land as the title says. Looking at both the possible need to track game or just hunting on the land. I'm thinking of a different approach, new for me, at least. OnX has the listings of private land adjacent to WMA land. Besides a "Knock, Knock" approach, I was thinking of a short introduction note, followed up by a personal visit. The note would be a notice of the visit. What have you BHers found effective? Thanks.
     
  2. Mod-it

    Mod-it Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I haven't knocked on doors for a long time, but when I used to:
    Have some cards printed or simply write some out with your name, phone number, vehicle description and license plate # that you can give to them. It shows that you aren't shady and they love the convenience of it.
    While some can get talkative many just want you to get to the point. Don't beat around the bush. "Hi, my name is Jason and I'd like to (bow, muzzleload, rifle) hunt (whitetails, pheasants, coyotes, turkeys) on your property". If they don't outright tell you to go away at that point, I'd then tell them that I'll follow every rule they have to the letter and treat the property with respect as if it were my own. If it was really desirable to me to get permission on a specific property I would also offer to give them a Saturday of labor, fixing fence, cutting firewood, etc. (I had plenty of my own stuff to do, so no I didn't offer this to every single one).
    I'd also always offer to bring by some goodies if successful, such as jerky or breakfast sausage.

    I had one old farmer I asked to pheasant hunt on that said yes, and then asked for me to come by the house first any time I wanted to go hunt. A week or so later I went by his place and he told me to grab my shotgun and follow him. He took me out to a building he stored a couple of combines in and explained that pigeons roosted in it and sh*t all over his combines, so I was to stand at one end while he walked in the other and when they flushed out I was to shoot every single one I could get. It was fun as heck and that was the routine with him for years every time I stopped by.
     
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  3. John T.

    John T. Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Mod-It, many thanks for the info.
    I was raised on a dairy farm. A farm about a mile away had an old barn that was full of pigeons. We would do the same thing as the pigeons would come over our barn. Should have bought stocks in Winchester.
    For the topic, I'm also a Hunter Education Instructor. Might add that. Raised on a farm so I know what farm animals and wildlife look like. Yes, helping is a good thing to mention; always something to do on a farm. Also, I would ask if it would be OK to bring my 14 yo grandson who is starting to hunt. I would mention that I would provide a two-part card for hunter and landowner to show permission was given to hunt in the property.
    My son and I hunted a farm once. Gentleman was very nice and was as country as cornbread. My wife made a pone of cornbread and took it to him. Thought I had given him surf and turf!
     
  4. alenhard15

    alenhard15 Grizzled Veteran

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    I wrote 150 letters and mailed them to property owners this past spring offering to help around the property however I could, of the 150 letters I got 2 properties to hunt totaling about 40 acres, we ended up ripping up an old fence, weed whacking, powerwashing and repainting a front porch snd it was well worth it!!
     
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