Getting into deer hunting

Discussion in 'Intro to Bowhunting & Archery' started by Recluse, Jul 4, 2020.

  1. Recluse

    Recluse Weekend Warrior

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    I’m going to try deer hunting this fall. I didn’t grow up hunting and got into hunting in my 30s. I’ve only upland hunted up to this point. Few questions

    -Do I bring EVERYTHING with me when headed to my stand ? (deer cart etc ). Or do I fetch some of this stuff after a kill?

    -Do I go to full draw when the deer is in sight? Or wait until they are within range ?

    -Do I bring my gear in a backpack ? The backpack goes in the stand with me ?

    I’m going to go with a buddy, but wanted to find out as much as possible beforehand

    thank you
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2020
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  2. Fix

    Fix Grizzled Veteran

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    As for the deer cart. No after the shot you want to wait 2hrs to 12 hrs placement pending before tracking the deer.

    As for gear to bring in backpack you will learn what you like. I always bring.
    1. Powder for thermals
    2. Trail mix
    3. Knife
    4. Journal to document


    Draw on the deer when it looks away and is in range. Even then you may need to draw down and redraw. Never release until you love the shot. Know your range and place markers if needed until you know distances
     
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  3. Recluse

    Recluse Weekend Warrior

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    Thank you
     
  4. Recluse

    Recluse Weekend Warrior

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    If I do get lucky and kill a deer, after field dressing , how long do I have to get it to the butcher?

    Do they usually help you unload it? Do I have to give them a heads up I’m coming ?

    Thanks again
     
  5. tbass3574

    tbass3574 Weekend Warrior

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    Typically get it to the butcher as soon as you can, weather is going to either be your friend or your enemy as for time. If it’s warm you’re going to want to get it their ASAP, and in some cases in early season people pack the chest cavity with ice to keep the meat cool, but with cooler or freezing temps time is on your side.

    Typically you don’t have to give the butchers a heads up, at least the ones I know don’t need it, they’ll help you unload it as well for, but some places I’ve been just have a cooler and you hoist it up and leave your information and what you want for cuts, every place is different.

    Don’t know how into it you’re looking to get, but if you have the time watch some YouTube videos on butchering deer, it can seem overwhelming at first but after your 2nd or 3rd deer you get into a routine and it becomes like clockwork and can save you a lot of money in the long run.

    Hope this helped let us know if you have any more questions!
     
  6. Recluse

    Recluse Weekend Warrior

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    Thanks man, definitely helpful. Do most of you just throw the deer in the bed of your truck ? I have a pretty big rig (Raptor), looking at hitch carrier options , not sure if that will permanently bend the hitch with the weight of the deer

    I used to haul my race bikes with a hitch carrier on my Expedition. Eventually it bent it downward
     
  7. oldnotdead

    oldnotdead Grizzled Veteran

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    Welcome and enjoy! A lot of your questions are relative to how far you travel to hunt. What ever you choose to bring two things will be a must ,enough water,something to suppress coughing, sooth a dry throat. Then the best seat pad to keep you comfortable in long sits. This unless you saddle hunt. Also I keep a "gutting bag" moist wipes, rubber gloves a piece of string to tie the bung hole and another clean bag to put your heart and or liver in if your in to that. If not to put your bloody gloves and wipes in.
    Besides the great suggestion for butchering your own, learn how to cape your deer. I'm not into trophies but if you are you need to learn how to cape your deer for taxidermy. You may find one that will do it for you,thoughthat may be rare and it delays processing so weather dictated.
     
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  8. Recluse

    Recluse Weekend Warrior

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    Guessing it’s a good idea to bring a cooler full of ice during the warmer months ? The place I’m hunting in September is 35 min from my house. And about the same distance from a butcher I plan to use (at least the first time)

    Can anyone share any creative way to get the feet in the bed of my truck ? Ramp? Hoist ?
     
  9. Ridgerunner3

    Ridgerunner3 Grizzled Veteran

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    I've seen some people put a piece of plywood the size of their truck bed down like a ramp to thetail gate. Roll the deer up on it, secure it, then lift the whole thing up and push it in deer and all.
    Sent from my SM-G960U using Bowhunting.com Forums mobile app
     
  10. oldnotdead

    oldnotdead Grizzled Veteran

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    When I had a truck I would have a sheet of PT plywood in the back. Pull sheet out just far enough to drop one end on ground. I'd tie rope around the neck and pull deer up on to the plywood then tie off. Next it was fairly easy to just lift the sheet up and slide in. BTW woman hunter that hunts alone. If legs are an issue 2short ratchet straps ,or saw off fronts at knees and wrap tight in plastic bags. Never do with back legs so it can hang.
     
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  11. oldnotdead

    oldnotdead Grizzled Veteran

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    Lol
    started that then had to check dinner
     
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  12. John T.

    John T. Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Tie the rope to a tree in front of the truck. Back up and the deer will load itself.
     
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  13. Fix

    Fix Grizzled Veteran

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    Where do you hunt? And earlier you mentioned a friend. Two guys can usually lift a big deer into a truck.
     
  14. arrowflinger1

    arrowflinger1 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Well damn that’s a great idea, gonna have to do this. Can’t believe I didn’t think of that before since I am always hunting by myself.
     
  15. Ridgerunner3

    Ridgerunner3 Grizzled Veteran

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    Same way i felt when someone told me about it...
    Sent from my SM-G960U using Bowhunting.com Forums mobile app
     
  16. oldnotdead

    oldnotdead Grizzled Veteran

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    I do this every year with my Gator. I personally wouldn't want to have rope dragging over the roof of my regular vehical. Being 5' 5" no way I'm tall enough to tie a rope high enough. Though still the angle would cause drag on back side of roof.

    Also when doing this racks can be a PITA. So tie rope to back legs to get it up and over tail gate. Still need to get out and check often to make sure the rack doesn't get caught on anything.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2020
  17. Recluse

    Recluse Weekend Warrior

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    Great advice, thanks so much

    I will be hunting in Delaware and Maryland
     
  18. Mod-it

    Mod-it Die Hard Bowhunter

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    What you bring in while hunting really depends on how far you hunt from your vehicle. If not a real long ways, then I'd leave it behind and fetch it if successful. The time to go retrieve a cart, etc. is good use of your time while giving an animal some time to expire after the shot (as long as you can do so and not accidently bump the animal).

    35 minutes from a cooler isn't bad at all, it really comes down to how long it takes you to get it to your vehicle to start that drive. If it has been a while, then getting the hide off is your first priority. I like to take two thin mattress sheets and sew three sides together, it will fit over the whole animal and keep the meat clean in case you have to skin it in the field. That's if you can get it out whole, game bags for quarters work well if you can't get the whole thing out at once. Game bags or sheets also help to keep flies and bees off the meat.
    Bone sour is your first worry as far as the meat spoiling. If it is pretty warm weather and you know it'll be a while before you can get the animal to a cooler, then boning it on the spot is best. There are several good youtube videos on how to do this.
     
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  19. Recluse

    Recluse Weekend Warrior

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    Thanks, regarding apparel : Under Armour has “early season” and “mid season.” With the differences being mostly the color

    Is this an actual thing I need to be concerned with ? Limited budget so trying to just buy only what’s needed. Does it really make a difference ?
     
  20. oldnotdead

    oldnotdead Grizzled Veteran

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    Some say yes, I don't bother worrying about it. What ever is on sale person here. If it keeps you dry and warm. I mix patterns. Here is the one thing you have to worry about...MOVEMENT....
    Not all movement is equal. If you are buck only hunting you can take up empty time practicing movement when doe are near. Slow fluid movements. The trick is realizing distance, you may get away with more movement the closer the deer is.That same movement with a mature buck at a distance away and he could nail you. The farther away the bigger the view picture they have. Example pick out, say a tree stand at a distance keep your head at that position and walk toward the stand to see what happens. Summer is a good time to learn what deer will or will not except or notice best not where you plan on hunting. Also learn vocals I've called deer to me in the dark after spooked because when they stomped and snorted I returned a stomp snort. Eye contact is another thing. If your spotted, avoid full eye contact. Keep them partially closed. Open just enough to see.
    So many things deer do that may surprise you they are so curious and like all creatures have individual personalities.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2020
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