Frost seeding clover

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by JakeD, Dec 29, 2015.

  1. JakeD

    JakeD Grizzled Veteran

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    The new property that we just bought has one big food plot on it that we want to plant part of in clover. I have frost seeded clover before, but it was on ground that was close to bare. This has some fescue/grass that is over ankle high on it right now. Would it be best to mow then frost seed? Or should we mow, try to break the ground, and then frost seed?
     
  2. Sota

    Sota Legendary Woodsman

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    The more prep you do the higher % of success you will find.
     
  3. No.6Hunter

    No.6Hunter Die Hard Bowhunter

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    You are going to want to mow so that seed can get down to bare earth. Not sure how much tillage is needed but it wouldn't hurt.
     
  4. coheley665

    coheley665 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    What Sota said.
    If I was going to take your route I would mow then rake before seeding trying to get the best seed to soil contact I can get
     
  5. JakeD

    JakeD Grizzled Veteran

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    I'm not too sure of how high the grass is. My brother looked at it, but I'll go see tomorrow what it looks like. I think it's probably not much more than ankle high, but I was thinking the same thing as what you guys are saying. Hopefully we will get a good stand, the deer really hammer clover around this property.
     

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