Frigid Forage Big n Beasty vs. Local seed store brassica mix

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by Farmer Brown, Jul 6, 2016.

  1. Farmer Brown

    Farmer Brown Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2016
    Posts:
    196
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Northern Wisconsin
    I have only planted brassicas from my local seed store and always had the same results. Not very impressive. Used correct fertilizer and lime and always had just reasonable results. Has anyone ever used big n beasty or other brands and did the seed make a difference? Any info will help since I have to put this in the ground asap. THANKS!
     
  2. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    Posts:
    11,944
    Likes Received:
    2,571
    Dislikes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Northern Indiana
    The biggest difference is prepping of the soil, proper PH, enough sunlight and RAIN. The most expensive, recommended or Nutritionist (just a joke) approved seed won't do crap without those first four...

    So if you actually got the PH up to where it needs to be, properly killed and prepared a seed bed and got solid/good rain amounts and the seed still didn't perform I'd say it was possibly any or all of the following:

    -Soil Test was or had a false reading on the PH
    -Seed purchased was old or had gotten moisture damage
    -Sunlight/Canopy cover may need re-examined, opening up the southern side of a plot can make a huge difference
    -Seeding rate, too thick or too little can result in failed plots

    Good luck! I've used both name brand stuff and local stuff.....without too terrible of a difference other than you gotta mix your own and stuff if going local depending on your feed store.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2016
  3. remmett70

    remmett70 Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2015
    Posts:
    2,421
    Likes Received:
    394
    Dislikes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Rothschild, WI
    If you plant this time of year or later, it is typically dry so there isn't the most moisture for growth, combined with short growing season of Northern WI. Guessing.
     
  4. Nissen121523

    Nissen121523 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2013
    Posts:
    172
    Likes Received:
    2
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NW Wisconsin
    Planted Big and Beasty in Northern Wisconsin last year on July 25th with proper PH and fertilizer. Grew to about 2ft tall -- astounding results, but was eaten completely to the ground by November 6th.

    Planting it again this weekend in hopes that the bulbs will be slightly bigger from a little longer growing season.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2016
  5. boonerville

    boonerville Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2013
    Posts:
    3,521
    Likes Received:
    3,297
    Dislikes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Southern Iowa
    As Ty mentioned, soil prep is the most important. As far as the seed...Big N Beasty is the same seed. The only advantage you get with most premixed seed is your ratio of different forages in the blend is going to be spot on. But the plants themselves are the same. There are a few food plot mixes that have varieties of brassicas that are unique and you can't get from an ag store. The guaranteed analysis label on the bag will give you lots of info. FWIW I have planted Big N Beasty and had good luck with it.
     
  6. Robson

    Robson Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Posts:
    114
    Likes Received:
    5
    Dislikes Received:
    1
    Location:
    NW IL
    Now I have no reasons why, but I totally have seen a difference in local co-op seed vs BNB. I planted local stuff for years. Followed directions to the T. The stuff grew great, looked great, but deer wouldn't eat it. Switched to BNB and the stuff performs amazing! Absolutely gets pounded. Just 100% based off observations.
     
  7. Farmer Brown

    Farmer Brown Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2016
    Posts:
    196
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Northern Wisconsin
    Good to hear Robson because my BnB is going in the ground tomorrow!
     
  8. Jeepwillys

    Jeepwillys Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2015
    Posts:
    2,450
    Likes Received:
    269
    Dislikes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Central, KY
    Split your field in half and do a test.
     
  9. Robson

    Robson Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Posts:
    114
    Likes Received:
    5
    Dislikes Received:
    1
    Location:
    NW IL
    Did that 2 years ago. BNB on left... Co-OP mix on right. Planted same day, same seed density, same fertilizer, same sunlight exposure, same rain fall, same ground slope, etc...

    BNB.jpg
     
  10. Jeepwillys

    Jeepwillys Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2015
    Posts:
    2,450
    Likes Received:
    269
    Dislikes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Central, KY
    If I'm reading right Farmer Brown is saying that the local wouldn't grow but was wondering if the anybody had used B&B.
    I was just suggesting he do a side by side, like you did, to see if its the seed or if its something else thats causing the issue. But i could be wrong.
     
  11. GregH

    GregH Legendary Woodsman

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2008
    Posts:
    13,558
    Likes Received:
    34,047
    Dislikes Received:
    22

    That is quite the difference! I have planted B&B and had excellent results.
     
  12. foodplot19

    foodplot19 Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2014
    Posts:
    8,449
    Likes Received:
    9,352
    Dislikes Received:
    5
    Location:
    West Central Missouri
    In my experience, which is worth an unknown amount of BS, it all depends on where it is planted and the type of surroundings. I planted the exact same mix last year at our farm and at my in-laws place in town. We are surrounded by agricultural ground, mostly beans and corn. Granted, last year was a VERY mild winter with only 5" of measurable snow/sleet. Mostly sleet. The acre we planted at my in-laws, which is in town with the nearest ag ground 2 miles away, was absolutely mowed down to the dirt. There were numerous times, while I was in the stand, that I watched the deer digging at the frozen ground trying to get more out to eat.
    At our farm it looked like the front of a food plot bag. Thick, lush, tall, and untouched. It wasn't until late winter, the end of Jaunuary first of February, that the deer finally got in there to eat the winter peas that we had planted.
    Come spring we disked numerous untouched turnips, that were the size of dinner plates, in to chunks.
    I've planted many of the food plot company varieties but I'm not sure what exactly makes the difference. As far as pH goes, our place is great. The pH at the in-laws is a constant battle. The ground there use to be farmed hard. The type of farming that takes all you can get out of the soil but don't put anything back to keep it in good shape. Last pH sample had the soil in the upper 5's. The pH at our place is in the upper 6's. They are about as different as you could get 2 spots. As the crow flies we are 11 miles from their place.

    One more thing to take in to consideration is the deer density of the area. At my in-laws the deer are everywhere and only archery hunting is allowed. At our place gun season is allowed and since we are in the "metro" area the antler restriction doesn't apply so it is the "brown and down" theory here.

    I guess I forgot this part. The mix we used is from a local store that will mix anything you want in any ratio you want. I patterened the mix from a popular name brand with the exact ratios they used of the same "brand" of seed they used. Seed tags are amazing.

    Just my 2 cents worth.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2016
  13. nutritionist

    nutritionist Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    May 20, 2014
    Posts:
    265
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    1
    there is a huge difference in genetics in brassicas. Also you want to plant a mix that is "balanced". Brassicas range from 42 days to maturity until 150 days on the swedes. Planting dates and soil types affect what you should plant. In my education plot i showed people over 15 types of brassicas and how they compare to each other in plant disease resistance, growth and ability to resist insects.

    I wrote a long piece in this months newsletter on brassicas in more detail that what i'll post here. Needless to say, brassicas are the most missunderstood forage in both genetics, seeding rates and also fertilization. Most people fertilize their brassicas wrong and leave out 2 essential elements that really affect growth and palatability.
     
  14. Jeepwillys

    Jeepwillys Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2015
    Posts:
    2,450
    Likes Received:
    269
    Dislikes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Central, KY
    How bout a link?
     
  15. foodplot19

    foodplot19 Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2014
    Posts:
    8,449
    Likes Received:
    9,352
    Dislikes Received:
    5
    Location:
    West Central Missouri
    Would definitely be interested in reading that article nutritionist?
     

Share This Page