Food Plot Question

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by P&YChaser, Jun 8, 2017.

  1. P&YChaser

    P&YChaser Weekend Warrior

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    Alright, so I've got a question that I wanted your input on. On our 40 acres we have 3 food plots, 1 ~ 1/2 acre and 2 ~ 1/4 acre, the largest we've had planted in clover the past 5 years and it's worked great, the smaller two we usually plant in radishes in late August. We were thinking of trying soybeans in one of the smaller plots this year but I'm not sure if we'll even get anything or if the deer/other critters will just mow it down too quickly. For context, the closest main ag field in all directions is at least 1/2 mile away in all directions and will either be corn or alphalpha. Would you guys bother trying for soybeans, or just stick with the radishes like we've had the last 3-5 years (or try something new to bring and keep deer in the area). Thanks for any insight you guys might have.
     
  2. copperhead

    copperhead Die Hard Bowhunter

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    It really depends on the deer density in your area. In a small plot the deer will mow the beans before they have time to grow. So here is what I would recommend. I would plant the plot in soybeans and then top dress it with a mix of clover and chicory. The soybeans act as a cover crop for the clover and chicory and if the beans get demolished they will be available. Additionally in the fall if the growth is sparse you can overseed with oats and cereal rye. I use Antler King NoSweat in those cases. Good luck and let us know what you do.
     
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  3. Siman/OH

    Siman/OH Legendary Woodsman

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    Im planting a 1/2 acre in Soybeans and Oats on Sunday. There is gonna be corn all around it and a few small food plots in the area as well. Im curious as to how much the deer are going to destroy the crop before it takes off. Kinda an experiment.
     
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  4. MILKMAN

    MILKMAN Newb

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    As stated already it depends a lot on deer density, but this year I planted about .25 of an acre in beans and put milorganite over it. A month after planting there was virtually no browsing in it. I had very good success also protecting our iron clay cowpeas in a similarly sized plot last year. I planted about another .25 acres of beans and put more milorganite on the new seeding. I'm not sure if the milorganite will continue to keep the deer off, but as of now it is working really well and worked last year for the ICPs. I usually apply it heavily when im planting and then try to get back in 3 weeks to do another application. I'll most likely continue to put it over the beans to try to get them to fully mature, but I may stop in late july or august once there established
     
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  5. sycamoretwitch

    sycamoretwitch Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I've deployed the following strategies on small bean plots in areas with high deer density.

    - planting 60 to 90 days before October 1. Right before a good rain.

    - Milorginate as mentioned above. I actually just line the perimeter of my plot with it.

    - Plotsaver. https://www.plotsaver.com about 4 to 5 feet high. Make sure to apply the mixture to the tape liberally. Set up immediately after planting because they will graze early before plant has the ability to establish.

    - scarecrow with a soler garden light on it. Dangle some old cd's from him as well.

    Hope this helps - I'm a huge fan and advocate for small bean plots!
     
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  6. P&YChaser

    P&YChaser Weekend Warrior

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    Really appreciate all the info guys, it's been very helpful! Just found out the guys who plant our plots doesn't have access to round-up ready bean seeds this year, so we'll have to find them for next year. Definitely looking forward to trying this out now with the success you guys have had with small acreage bean plots.
     
  7. sycamoretwitch

    sycamoretwitch Die Hard Bowhunter

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    It's not hard to get left over rr beans. Many farmers have a few bags left over in the barn every year and would either give them to you or charge you a small fee.

    You ask for responses and get some great information and you give up on the idea because the person doing your plots can't access rr beans?! Really? Anyone planting food plots that wants to find some rr beans can probably find then if they ask...

    I've used 2 year old rr beans before and still had success with them.
     

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