Food plot in the middle of the woods(.need suggestions)

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by AmericanVeteranOutdoors, Apr 1, 2015.

  1. AmericanVeteranOutdoors

    AmericanVeteranOutdoors Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2015
    Posts:
    70
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Clearing out around 1/4 of an acre this year as a kill plot. It will be located 100 yards from our 3 1/2 acre for plot where we are planting a clover. Had planned to plant turnips and radishes. I was wondering what would be the best thing to plant in the kill plot. I want to give the deer a verity of food.6hrs of sunlight a day will be on the plot. Any suggestions will help.
     
  2. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    Posts:
    11,944
    Likes Received:
    2,571
    Dislikes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Northern Indiana
    Best thing to plant first is a scoop in multiple spots...have those scoops soil tested and get PH and levels in line :D

    From there seed discussion can occurs. In full green up how much light will this plot truly get? Brassicas in our experience requires very good sunlight to truly produce well and big bulbs if brassica types chosen are bulb producers. Oats/Winter Rye/Wheat could be a lot better option possibly depending....and perhaps even clover as it does well in limited light.
     
  3. WLM

    WLM Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2015
    Posts:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    1/4 acre kill plot is not very big. Which is the reason for it but If you have any type of DPSM it will not last long. IMO make the kill plot clover and go with other food sources in your 3 1/2 acres where it has a better chance to succeed. As stated above Brassicas need full sunlight to reach full potential.
     
  4. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    Posts:
    11,944
    Likes Received:
    2,571
    Dislikes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Northern Indiana
    You'd scoff at our 1/16th acre spots :) bahaha! I agree with you though honestly clover on the small plot and true mass tonnage production on the large one was where my head was going too.
     
  5. WLM

    WLM Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2015
    Posts:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    I never scoff at any type of plot..Especially with the work that goes into them and the enjoyment that comes from them.
     
  6. bucksnbears

    bucksnbears Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2014
    Posts:
    3,390
    Likes Received:
    2,917
    Dislikes Received:
    22
    i agree with the others. clover in a smallarea with limited daylight
     
  7. ShaneB22

    ShaneB22 Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2014
    Posts:
    1,837
    Likes Received:
    2
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Try secret spot by imperial
     
  8. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    Posts:
    11,944
    Likes Received:
    2,571
    Dislikes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Northern Indiana
    I cannot remember off hand but if this is the stuff I'm thinking of it has a lot of filler ryegrass (not Winter Rye which you want). Nothing more than grass really.....if this is the case don't use.
     
  9. Northwoods Whitetails

    Northwoods Whitetails Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2012
    Posts:
    99
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Menominee,MI.
    I would definitely not plant brassicas on that small of a plot. If your going to plant clover, I would plant it this spring. It will be slow growing with the lack of sunlight. Rye or wheat is another option. Plant it in August when rain is present.
     
  10. Ben/PA

    Ben/PA Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    Posts:
    6,289
    Likes Received:
    4
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Hughesville, PA
    Oats oats oats. 1/4 acre is plenty.[​IMG]
    This is like a 1/16, they crush it all season and it holds up. Plant around Labor Day. Buy regular farm oats, don't even need to lime a ton or fertilize usually. Life's not that hard.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2015
  11. AmericanVeteranOutdoors

    AmericanVeteranOutdoors Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2015
    Posts:
    70
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    It'll see around 6 hrs a day. Obviously I'd like to have one bigger but when you only got 40 acres you make due. If I had 25k to spend on a spot I'd go to Illinois but hey you do what you gotta. Thanks for all the input. I'll go with clover. When is the best time to plant knowing they won't get too much light
     
  12. WLM

    WLM Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2015
    Posts:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    ASAP!!!!
     
  13. bucksnbears

    bucksnbears Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2014
    Posts:
    3,390
    Likes Received:
    2,917
    Dislikes Received:
    22
  14. AmericanVeteranOutdoors

    AmericanVeteranOutdoors Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2015
    Posts:
    70
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    We're still getting light frosts here. I know frosts can kill some plants. Does this matter with clover
     
  15. boonerville

    boonerville Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2013
    Posts:
    3,521
    Likes Received:
    3,297
    Dislikes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Southern Iowa
    On the contrary.....it's the best time to plant clover. The freezing and thawing of early spring will pull the clover seeds just under the surface and they will be the first ones to germinate. The seeds won't sprout until moisture& temperature in the soil are adequate, but the cold won't hurt them. The seeds will stay dormant until it warms up. It's easier to plant clover this way because you don't need equipment. The clover will sprout sooner than a lot of grasses or forbs that need warmer soil temps, which gives it a jump start and will help shade out weeds.
     
  16. jdhaines32

    jdhaines32 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Posts:
    174
    Likes Received:
    4
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    So if the OP plants clover now in his small plot, how long into the fall hunting season will the clover actually be worth while for hunting purposes? I'm in a similar situation and was considering clover, but didn't know how long clover lasts into the fall and or winter. I was just curious since this is mostly new to me and I am looking for ideas for a small kill plot in the woods as well.
     
  17. boonerville

    boonerville Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2013
    Posts:
    3,521
    Likes Received:
    3,297
    Dislikes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Southern Iowa
    Depends on what kind of clover and your location.
     
  18. jdhaines32

    jdhaines32 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Posts:
    174
    Likes Received:
    4
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    What clover would be recommended for longest lasting through the hunting season in central Pa?
     
  19. boonerville

    boonerville Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2013
    Posts:
    3,521
    Likes Received:
    3,297
    Dislikes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Southern Iowa
    As a rule, clover is an early to mid season forage. But a healthy perennial white clover will last the longest. I would not plant an annual clover. Most of those are warm season legumes that mature pretty early. If planting a specialty clover made for deer...imperial whitetail clover or non typical clover (from biologic) are both great. If using a standard clover, dwarf alsike would be my top choice...but there are several small white clovers that will work well. Virtually all clovers will go dormant after repeated hard frosts. If you want a late season attractant I would go with something else
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2015
  20. Northwoods Whitetails

    Northwoods Whitetails Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2012
    Posts:
    99
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Menominee,MI.
    The type of clover you can plant will depend on your soil. Sandy soil will not sustain a good white ladino clover blend very well. If you have good black soil and the ph is good, plant a variety of white ladino clovers. The deer hit ours all the way into December. If you have sandy soil, I would suggest red clover for now.
     

Share This Page