Food plot ideas

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by jdhaines32, Feb 2, 2015.

  1. jdhaines32

    jdhaines32 Weekend Warrior

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    So last year I planted a small plot of Whitetail Institute Bowstand and Secret Spot in our woods. I filled everything in the fall and seeded. It took real well and was nice and green but the deer didn't pay much attention to it. I'm thinking because of the amount of rye grass it just wasn't bas appetizing.

    This year I would like to plant something in the spring that would get the deer used to coming by the area more often than just passing by. I would assume there isn't much I could plant in the spring that would last through the Pa archery and possible rifle season. So I am looking for suggestions for what to plant in the spring that that I could plow up if needed and the plant something else in the fall. How long does clover last if planted in the spring? Could I plant that and then plant some kind of brassicas turnips and radish in the fall to hunt over later in archery season. Maybe I'm trying to get to much out of this too so any suggestions are appreciated. Thanks
     
  2. Sota

    Sota Legendary Woodsman

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    Rye grass is no good.
     
  3. timcon

    timcon Weekend Warrior

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    Eagle Seed Soybeans are hard to beat ! ... unlike a conventional soybean Eagle Seed Forage Soybeans keep growing until frost kills them .. they produce lots of browse tonnage ... and if the deer over browse them ... you can broadcast Eagle Seed Broadside mix in them ..for extra Fall browse Deer love them .... Talk to Brad at Eagle Seed ... He can get you set up with the correct variety for your location .... they will mail them right to your door.
     
  4. Spear

    Spear Grizzled Veteran

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    How so? Rye grass is high in protein and is very easy for deer to digest. The deer nail the rye grass on my property.
     
  5. Sota

    Sota Legendary Woodsman

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    Is it winter rye or rye grass that you are talking about? Winter rye the deer will pound, rye grass not so much.
     
  6. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

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    Doug, you talking Winter Rye correct? Rye grass is not the same as the grain rye you purchase from ag seed suppliers or find in many of the pre-mixed deer seed mixes.

    As for the OP, soybeans are always the easiest go to, but depending on size and your localized deer herd they may be tough to get to maturity due to overbrowse. Rye, oats, peas, buckwheat, soybeans all are great spring plantings that will get deer used to finding food and easily killed/tilled off and seeded than again in the fall or simply overseeded as needed. If you want beans, just be ready to possibly need to take measures to allow them to grow some (electric fencing, deer deterent products and such).
     
  7. Spear

    Spear Grizzled Veteran

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    Oh, I guess I've always used the term "rye grass" for winter rye. I am referring to the grain not the grass. Both are high in protein, but one is more palatable.
     
  8. POWERHAWK_11

    POWERHAWK_11 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    You could go with alfalfa. Deer love it just as it is coming up with the tender sprouts. It will last a good while because it is pretty browse tolerant since it is mowed for hay a few times per year. If it establishes well you could just over seed your fall/winter blend right into it and give the deer/turkey something to eat from spring through winter. From what I understand you can frost seed it and it will germinate as soon as the weather breaks. Just an idea.
     
  9. BigPhil_H

    BigPhil_H Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I'm going with Whitetail Institute's Clover blend this year and going to try frost seeding for my first time. Goodluck
     
  10. boonerville

    boonerville Grizzled Veteran

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    What will do the best depends on a lot of variables. There isn't a magic plant that will work no matter what. Each plot is different. Taking the time to evaluate the site before deciding what to plant will pay off huge. Im not sure how much I'm allowed to say on here without it being considered advertising...but I own a hunting property consulting company. I've seen a lot of plots fail because someone planted what his "buddy" said would work
     
  11. kyle6464

    kyle6464 Weekend Warrior

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    Could always try DoubleCross from WI has clover for early season and brassica for later in the year. If possible try and make another small plot and plant and early season plot and also a late season.
     
  12. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

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    boonerville, just keep providing advice similar to what I and others do, there is quite a few on here that a habitat consultants, throw it in your signature and PM me your general location. If I ever get any consulting requests that I can't do or want to travel too but are by you I'll send them your way.
     
  13. boonerville

    boonerville Grizzled Veteran

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    Thanks....pm sent
     
  14. boonerville

    boonerville Grizzled Veteran

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    I'm a big fan of double cross. Depending on your soil makeup it could be a very good option if you want to establish a perennial in that spot, but still get immediate attraction from an annual
     
  15. jdhaines32

    jdhaines32 Weekend Warrior

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    I will definitely check out the Double Cross. Has anyone tried the No Plow. On there website it says about 9 months of food plot coverage. I am able to till up the ground if that makes a difference.
     
  16. boonerville

    boonerville Grizzled Veteran

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    I plant no plow every fall in a plot I have in the woods. Basically a path I cleared through some thick woods with a dozer. It does really well for early season. I fertilize mine with 17-17-17 when i plant. I don't till up the ground
     

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