Food plot/ bedding area??

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by Billkil1187, Aug 13, 2018.

  1. Billkil1187

    Billkil1187 Newb

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    i have a plot just under a 1/2 acre in size and is shaped like a old sand hour glass..there’s nothing but huge beach/ hard woods around . I am confused if I should try and plant it as a clover/food plot or some tall grass for bedding? Or how about mixing the two so it’s a bedding area with clover mixed in it?? I wonder if the deer can bed and get up and eat in same safe place if they would like that better? Any info is appreciated
     
  2. Sota

    Sota Legendary Woodsman

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    If you have bedding near your food plot you are upping your odds that you will be busted trying to sneak in before sunrise.
     
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  3. Billkil1187

    Billkil1187 Newb

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    Oh great point never thought of that
     
  4. Sota

    Sota Legendary Woodsman

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    I have natural cover around my main plot, I don't even try to enter before the sun is up because of this usually just hunt evenings but even then I have been there many times sitting as the sun goes down and you see fawns doing the circle before they bed down in the clover. A green laser is your friend to move the deer off the plot so you can sneak out.
     
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  5. GV/MN

    GV/MN Newb

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    This isn't cut and dry and there are a lot of questions without knowing your land and if you own or lease but some things to start with. Access to and from your stand is key since this is a mature woods it makes this challenging. Also, it sounds like an evening setup because you will have a difficult time getting in there in the AM and bumping deer off the food source. Also if you can determine where the does are currently bedding that will allow for a setup of a stand between the bedding and your created destination food source. Be careful not to over hunt the food plot and educate the deer

    If you can attract the Does and manage their movement which is linear to and from bedding and food, you will also have a good chance at bucks during the rut checking them out. You will need security and food combine. Since this is mature woods, I would recommend dropping trees around this food plot to create screening and security (edge feathering). This will also assist with your access into your stands. Downing some trees will also allow sunlight for future growth and browse. I would recommend a fall specific blend of food since clover looses its attraction after the first frost.
     
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  6. Team Haastyle

    Team Haastyle Weekend Warrior

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    Bedding and food have their place on every property, but putting them in the right spots is key. Researching your general wind directions, land contour, stand access, current deer bedding, and deer travel corridors all play huge factors. My first recommendation is to sit back and look at your property. Ask yourself the following questions;

    1) Do I have enough food/forage?

    2) Is there food/forage surrounding the property?

    3) How do I access the food with minimal disturbance?

    4) What winds work best for each potential food location?

    5) Where is the food located in regards to bedding locations?

    6) Is there enough bedding (both cool and warm season bedding)?

    7) How much of my property is sanctuary (left alone)?

    8) Are my sanctuaries in the correct spot?

    9) What does my current bedding consist of (prairie, pines, hillsides, etc.)?

    10) Is there enough water? (I know not part of original question, but should ask it)

    Really the list goes on and on. Figure that about 50-75%+ of your property acreage should be sanctuary for the deer. Obviously the more the better. Also, a general rule of thumb is that roughly 5-10% of your property acreage should be implemented forage (food plots). These numbers obviously vary property to property, but are general guidelines for you.
     

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