First Time Arrow Build

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by fishsoft92, Oct 19, 2020.

  1. fishsoft92

    fishsoft92 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2013
    Posts:
    459
    Likes Received:
    170
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Channahon Illinois
    so, im thinking of fully building my arrows for the first time before next season. My thought process is tha i need to re string my bow and get more arrows anyway, but easton no longer makes the bowfires that ive been shooting for 3 or 4 years now. all that being the case, i had a few questions on the process.

    1. is there any reason i cant use the dremel i have with a metal cutting wheeel to make the cut if i build a jig with lumber i have on hand from remodeling my house?

    2. i tend to like my arrows longer than my draw length requires, how much is too much?

    3. ive seen some guys go as far as to shoot bare shaft and decide vane orientation based on what the shaft itself does, is that really worth all the extra time or should i just stay with the right offset i always have?

    4. slightly different but related topic, how much of a jump from building arrows is it to building out your bow yourself, like getting a press and vice and all that?

    any advice would be greatly appreciated, all ive ever done is refletch arrows that have had their vanes cut or hit while tuning or target shooting.
     
  2. Fix

    Fix Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2016
    Posts:
    5,647
    Likes Received:
    6,305
    Dislikes Received:
    22
    Location:
    Western NY
    You can cut your own arrows without any impact. Just try to go high speed as possible and cut them flat.
    As for length you can go as long as you would like but always revert back to the chart when determining spine once you have decided on length.
    I don't go as far as checking for heavy side for spine but I do bare shaft tune. If you are going to have the arrows bare might as well. I prefer helical on my vanes but to each their own.
    As for rig that's up to money. I plan on getting a vice and press and unit to check cycle but my local shop let's me use theirs. If you have the funds it's always better to own one.


    Good luck and let us know what you do


     
  3. Katt72

    Katt72 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2015
    Posts:
    217
    Likes Received:
    59
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Houston ,TX
    Fix likes this.
  4. cantexian

    cantexian Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2013
    Posts:
    4,962
    Likes Received:
    6,301
    Dislikes Received:
    5
    Check out this thread. I made I DIY arrow saw from the information here.

    https://forums.bowhunting.com/threads/diy-arrow-saw.90328/
     
  5. fishsoft92

    fishsoft92 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2013
    Posts:
    459
    Likes Received:
    170
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Channahon Illinois
  6. fishsoft92

    fishsoft92 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2013
    Posts:
    459
    Likes Received:
    170
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Channahon Illinois
    Has anyone used the Easton Helios arrows? Those are the ones I’m thinking about trying.
     
  7. Mod-it

    Mod-it Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2019
    Posts:
    868
    Likes Received:
    1,127
    Dislikes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Idaho
    I believe you were referring to shooting the arrows as bare shafts and determining which way the bow spins them, but here's another thought process that benefits shooting them first before fletching.
    You'll want to cut them and have inserts, extra weight or whatever else you plan set up before doing this.
    Bare shaft shooting before fletching will allow you to find the dynamic spine before you fletch them.
    The idea is to nock tune and get them all flying to the same point of impact. If you have some arrows that group in a slightly different spot then you spin the nock and shoot them again. Keep doing this until all arrows hit the same POI. Now you can mark each arrow for where the indicator vane will be. I like to keep the marked part of the nock on the left side and orient the indicator vane up for my drop away.
    You can do the above by either shooting them through paper or shooting them into a layered BH type target. Either way you want to tune the bow first, it won't work unless your bow is spitting them straight, in time, brace height correct, etc., etc.
    When I order them already fletched I always end up with some arrows with the indicator vane oriented up, but others with it out, etc., so they all fly to the same POI.
    Bare shaft tuning will also confirm if your spine is correct as well. A weak spine will often show a nock left condition. Since you want to leave them longer, make sure you go with the stiffer spine if you're on the edge between two spines.
     
    Fix likes this.
  8. fishsoft92

    fishsoft92 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2013
    Posts:
    459
    Likes Received:
    170
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Channahon Illinois
    I think they call what i was thinking of clocking the arrow. but ill do that when i go to get the new arrows too.
     

Share This Page