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Filming Your Hunts/Challenges That Come With It

Discussion in 'Bowhunting Talk' started by whitetaildna, Dec 30, 2016.

  1. whitetaildna

    whitetaildna Newb

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    Everything I learned During my First Season Filming my Hunts | WhitetailDNA

    Today I posted an article on my blog detailing everything I learned this year filming my hunts. My question to you guys is what would you add to my list in this article? Do you film your hunts, and if so what do you find to be most challenging? Do you prioritize video, or not screwing up a shot opportunity?

    For those that don't film, is there a specific reason, and have you ever thought about trying it?
     
  2. Skywalker

    Skywalker Grizzled Veteran

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    I think you summed up my feelings pretty well. I have been self filming for 5 seasons now. I think the amount of gear and setup time/take-down time is probably the biggest challenge for me. I have evolved my gear over the last 5 years to make it quicker, quieter and easier than what it used to be.

    If I'm going to the trouble of filming my hunts, I'm not taking a shot off camera. I have been fortunate enough that I haven't blown a shot on bucks because of filming. I've had a few times on does where I was willing to take a shot but couldn't transition from the camera to the bow without getting buster. I'm fine with that.

    I agree that you need to be able to think outside the box. Every guy with a camera takes the exact same type of footage, you need to be able to provide something different to catch peoples attention. One of the most annoying shots to me is when the camera man is following the hunter while blood trailing. The camera is always moving around and bouncing, it just doesn't translate well to the finished product. Having a gimbal to steady those types of shots can make a huge difference in production value. Of coarse they are darn expensive. I use my drone to get that footage. I can hand carry it and it has the built in gimbal that stabilizes that footage so you get the feel of a real high end production. That type of out of the box thinking is what you need to be able to get a professional production with an amateur budge.
     
  3. Westfinger

    Westfinger Grizzled Veteran

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    I have self filmed my hunts for the last few years. I enjoy the challenges it brings as well as having the ability to share what is otherwise a solitary activity with others. I always have a camera with me, might be my G40 or only a go pro if its raining. I film for me and don't have any illusions about the quality of my videos. They are raw lack originality and sophistication.

    I'm a hunter first but I'm not lugging video equipment around for exercise I want the shot on tape. I haven't been in a situation where I had to pass on a target buck because I couldn't get the shot on film. I did have the unfortunate experience of forgetting to hit record for the first time this season. Feels like i wasted a seasons worth of footage because I didn't have the climatic ending to my buck season on tape.

    It is definitely a way to breath new life into your bowhunting experience.
     
  4. Sota

    Sota Legendary Woodsman

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    I don't video my hunts, never will. I don't enjoy watching other people hunt can't imagine wanting to watch me hunt.
     
  5. Excalibur

    Excalibur Weekend Warrior

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    I would love to video my hunts. Going to start looking into a go pro and a mount soon. This will bring on a different challenge.

    Your friendly neighborhood Bow Hunter
     
  6. Uncle Bucky

    Uncle Bucky Newb

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    Been self filming since 2007... my advice to those interested.> RUN !! .. LOL

    Be prepared for the worst... take extras of everything, especially batteries...

    I guess I told myself after a mishap in 2012 where I did not double check the camera, it was zoomed in too far, shot a buck that had come into the decoy on a brisk walk and after the shot jumped, stopped, turned to the decoy and flared up, all the while blood spewing from the two HUGE Rage Extreme holes two feet on each side of him then only to tip over and end up just 10 yards from the stand and decoy... I thought " I just got the most incredible footage I have every taken" only to see the camera was zoomed way in and not zoomed all the way out and only caught his feet and legs when he stopped and then some of his body falling.

    See I had done a talk zoomed in on the decoy to avoid doing a voice over while editing. Shut the camera and did not zoom out.. then as I was getting ready to get out of the tree the buck came stomping in and I had to "fire drill " it and literally opened the camera, hit record and seven seconds later shot the buck.

    So I told myself I would not shoot a buck or anything worth while without making sure it was on film.. So far that has worked out with about 30 kills on video since.

    It is so hard to get everything to work out and get good footage. I try to somewhat zoom in on animals but when you are bow hunting there has to be some room for error, meaning you have to have the critter with enough room so when you draw if it moves you still have it in frame.

    Also make sure on afternoon hunts to pull you bow up first, then set up your stuff. Got caught in 2009 with my bow on the ground and a big non typical staring at me from 20 yards...

    I really enjoy the challenge , but don't get hard on yourself when things go wrong, and they WILL go wrong.
     
    PiN 'eM & STiCK 'Em likes this.
  7. Afflicted

    Afflicted Grizzled Veteran

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    I film for myself and friends., Hunters and non hunters alike and I'm just happy to bring something back to share the experience. It's amazing the stuff we see and get to witness that happens just that once and we get to share it because we take the extra effort to film.

    So many friends come back with cool stories from the stand and kick themselves for not getting a video or photo.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  8. Pops423

    Pops423 Weekend Warrior

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    Great article. I too started this year. I'll try to get some pictures up of my setup and equipment a little later on.

    It definitely adds a whole new dimension to hunting. haha.
     
  9. bloodcrick

    bloodcrick Moderator/BHOD Prostaff

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    It can be a challenge especially the first year. The first year is a lot of learning curves of rights and wrongs. I made things go easier going to three cam arms on the three hottest stands at the time, and move if I need to that way im not packing so much gear. Once you learn the sweet spot of where to hang your arms helps to. I did it because I wanted a new challenge, and filming was just that. Learning the camera and all the features it has makes for a better segment. Good quality film is an art ! Its so nice being able to shows other my adventures in hunting other than just telling about it. Do it for you if that's what you like doing, If others don't like it, well then they don't lol
     
  10. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

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    This next year shall be my first fully dedicated set up with a true camera, 2nd angles and more....cannot wait but also already assume it shall cost me at some point, perhaps this year even.
     
  11. copperhead

    copperhead Grizzled Veteran

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    Shawn,
    Do yourself a favor and skip the Go Pro. Its great for those close ups and interviews type of stuff but for getting shots on camera its not ideal. You can buy a decent low end HD camcorder for about the same price as the Go Pro and it will serve you better.
     
  12. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

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    Not a Go Pro but an Epic Cam guy here regretting it now...a small HD Handycam can be had cheaply enough and now would make a much better second angle camera than my Epic Cam.
     
  13. MnHunterr

    MnHunterr Legendary Woodsman

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    I don't film my hunts and never will for 2 main reasons.

    1. I already have enough stuff to lug into the woods.
    2. Granted I've never self filmed, I feel that your focus behind a camera is more on "getting the perfect angle/camera shot" than the actual hunt or harvest.

    Pictures of my harvests work just fine.
     
  14. copperhead

    copperhead Grizzled Veteran

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    Great article. I subscribed to your newsletter. Lots of good information and definitely a site I can get behind. I started filming a few years ago but it went to the wayside this year. I regret that now. Found that I really enjoyed the challenge of filming my own hunts. I just wanted to have fun with it and be able to share my experience with others. Not to make money or get sponsors or anything like that because the last thing I want is for my hobby to become a job. Im not serious enough about it not to get a shot on camera. My main reason for hunting is venison and I only take what I need.

    I also use it as a tool. I can go back and review shots as in the heat of the moment everything is not what it seems.

    I learned a lot but mostly I suck at filming but I am still having fun with it and will continue to do so. I also learned I would rather be behind the camera vice in front of it. I am not an attractive or charismatic person so the hardest part for me is the interviews and making those entertaining. Maybe I should wear a mask. :evilgrin:
     
  15. Hillbilly Jedi

    Hillbilly Jedi Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I agree with the others saying don't worry about the GoPro. It's nice as maybe a 2nd angle or putting in the tree if you a shot of you taking the shot. I have a GoPro, well I borrow my daughters but, the footage shakes when it's attached to your bow and you shoot. Also the screen is small and it's hard to follow the animal after the shot. (Not to mention the first thing you should do is be reaching for a 2nd arrow if a followup shot is possible. IMO) There's no zoom and so far the video I've gotten from Sony HandyCam has been MUCH better. This camera at the Amazon link: Amazon.com : Sony HDR-CX220/B High Definition Handycam Camcorder with 2.7-Inch LCD (Black) (Discontinued by Manufacturer) : Camera & Photo is close to if not the same camera I have. For $139, I don't think you can beat it. If you want to see some footage with it, I have 5 videos on my YouTube channel here HillbillyJedi88 - YouTube The deer are from 80 - 120 yards away so it will give you an idea of the zoom quality. Most of the shakiness is from the $29 tripod I used.

    My biggest challenge at the moment is finding some decent equipment, (camera arm & fluid head) for a reasonable price. I'll learn the other things as I go along.

    If you want a challenge videoing a hunt, try videoing a turkey hunt. With eyes like and eagle and their main source of sensing danger, it will test your talent for sure.
     
  16. Dutchd

    Dutchd Weekend Warrior

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    What kind of investment are we talking about to get set up?
    And what are the basics?
    Thanks from a novice bowhunter
     
  17. Hillbilly Jedi

    Hillbilly Jedi Die Hard Bowhunter

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    All depends on your hunting style. I film more from a ground blind so a cheap tripod works ok for me right now. Say $40 for a cheap tripod, $200 or less for a camera. Couple SD cards and you can start filming. (I'm implying you already have computer to edit the video. That's a whole nether topic) More money comes with a camera arm for in a tree stand, nice fluid head, better video camera, and you can get just about as expensive as you want. Honestly I think you could put together a pretty nice filming setup for about $500 or less. You can easily get to $5000 if you have that to spend. But for some decent video, YouTube stuff, you could do it for $500 or bit less.
     
  18. copperhead

    copperhead Grizzled Veteran

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    Start out small to see if you like it. If you do then upgrade slowly over time as you can afford it.

    you will need:

    1. Camera
    2. Muddy micro arm
    3. bow hanger
    4. tripod


    The Muddy micro camera arm is around 20 bucks now and can be attached to a bow hanger. That would be a minimalistic setup. You can find used cameras on Ebay for a decent price most of the time.
     
  19. bloodcrick

    bloodcrick Moderator/BHOD Prostaff

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    I have one for sale 
     
  20. whitetaildna

    whitetaildna Newb

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    Thanks for the kind words, and subscribing, I really appreciate the support! I especially agree with you on the fact that filming can be used to relive the experiences and as a tool. I've already had it happen more than once where I am someone who can get lost in the moment easily, and being able to look back at the film has served me really well. I wasn't very good at talking in front of the camera, but I think that is something that comes with time. I think getting used to it is the biggest thing for people.
     

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