Early season scouting????

Discussion in 'Whitetail Deer Hunting' started by Reece, Mar 15, 2016.

  1. Reece

    Reece Newb

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    This year I want to start scouting early this year. Where I hunt there is some swampy areas and some thick wooded spot and even a creek that runs through the area. I was wondering where and what I should start to look for. I will take any advice. Thanks
     
  2. elkguide

    elkguide Grizzled Veteran

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    Haven't you started yet? I find that some of the best scouting begins as soon as the season is over. With winter coming on and not worrying about spooking the deer out of the area, I go right in to the areas that I have thought to have been being used as bedding/staging areas during the past season. Trails are still fresh with tracks and you can get an "eyes on" look at what was happening there. Now that the snow has gone and nothing has started to grow, I am able to see the runways and find the scrapes and rubs that I missed last fall. I also sometimes get to see deer that have started to move back in to their spring, summer and fall living rooms. So much to do. So little time.
     
  3. Parker70

    Parker70 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Scout before the leaves come out. After the season I scout when all the deer sign is fresh and easily seen. Move stands in February. She'd hunt until turkey season. After that I stay out of the woods unless I'm refreshing a lick or checking a camera, but try to keep all that to a minimum.

    Last thing you want to do is tromp around a month before the season bumping deer.
     
  4. blueicefire

    blueicefire Weekend Warrior

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    Need to look for natural funnels and try to find if any fences or areas that that look easier to travel than others.

    Need to start scouting when the snow is gone in late winter early spring. My cams have been out since February, just pulled them in to change a couple locations. The deer need to get used to someone potentially walking around, not walking around a month or two before.
     
  5. KCW

    KCW Newb

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    First I would recommend getting an inventory on the deer you have on the property. Whether that be with trail cameras or glassing fields. Then look at maps such as topos and aerial photos so you can find spots that are going to be potentially better than others, Comments, this link will help for things to look for. Them it just comes to getting out there and hanging stands with the info you gathered. Granted you're probably gonna have to tweak them once the leaves fall, food sources change, or when they get into their fall patterns. It's not easy by any means and it's a process the earlier you can get out the better
     
  6. Spear

    Spear Grizzled Veteran

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    For me, summer scouting is more for checking up on the herd - trying to get an idea of the herd health, buck to doe ratio, how many fawns are running around, etc.,. Fall scouting is usually best for formulating a hunting plan because right now all the bucks are in groups and their patterns and range will change drastically come fall. Just my opinion, I've been at fault for trying to do too much in the summer and not enough during the fall, so just my opinion and don't want you to make the same mistake I made in the past. Good luck, and make sure to check for ticks!!
     
  7. Bowguy

    Bowguy Weekend Warrior

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    Imo scouting should be low impact. Drives roads looking for deer at dusk n scouting where they are now isn't where they'll be come fall. Scout developing food sources that area deer prefer. In the woods I hunt that often means acorns. Whites are preferred blacks second.
    You can go into the woods mid day mid to late summer n bring binos. Go onto an oak ridge look up. You'll see the nuts growing n you'll be able to plan a place to be certain times of the season. Once the white oaks drop you can head to the black oaks. Years of bad mast drop n you'll be way ahead of most knowing this type information.
    If soybean is in your area that can be a killer food source when it's green but by me once it Yellows it's less used. Brown they're back in.
    Corm right after harvest can be fantastic, cut corn besides being a food source may cut your cover down n the deer that were in it now in the woods surrounding it but you need to know where the corn is n keep tabs on the farmer.
    Hope some of that helps
     
  8. Bowguy

    Bowguy Weekend Warrior

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    Imo scouting should be low impact. Drives roads looking for deer at dusk n scouting where they are now isn't where they'll be come fall. Scout developing food sources that area deer prefer. In the woods I hunt that often means acorns. Whites are preferred blacks second.
    You can go into the woods mid day mid to late summer n bring binos. Go onto an oak ridge look up. You'll see the nuts growing n you'll be able to plan a place to be certain times of the season. Once the white oaks finish dropping you can head to the black oaks. Years of bad mast drop n you'll be way ahead of most knowing this type information.
    If soybean is in your area that can be a killer food source when it's green but by me once it Yellows it's less used. Brown they're back in.
    Corn right after harvest can be fantastic, cut corn besides being a food source may cut your cover down n the deer that were in it now in the woods surrounding it but you need to know where the corn is n keep tabs on the farmer.
    Hope some of that helps
     
  9. Eddie234

    Eddie234 Weekend Warrior

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    Start with google earth, look for pinch points and other good areas. Mark them on your GPS. Go to those areas and set up some trail cams. Check them in about 30 days and see what you have. Patterns may change from summer feeding to fall patterns but it will give you a starting point. Just make sure your able to adjust stand locations accordingly.
     
  10. early in

    early in Grizzled Veteran

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    I don't even go into my woods until August, when I put my cams out. I don't actually scout until I start looking at the white oaks in my area the beginning of Sept. After hunting my area for the last 13 years, I pretty much know where/when the activity is taking place, or not. lol
     
  11. Meatmissle32

    Meatmissle32 Newb

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    swamp chestnuts is a must , where the food is the deer will be
     
  12. daniel72

    daniel72 Weekend Warrior

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    I normally only go into the woods to check feeders, trail cams and food plots. The last time I went to the woods last Wednesday walking the trail to one of my feeders I spotted a bedding area about 15 yards off my trail. I plan on going Saturday and sitting in a stand most the day to do some scouting and see how they are moving near my stands since I don't have any trail cams near my stand
     

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