Eagle Seed Forage Soybeans vs Ag Soybeans

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by MILKMAN, Feb 4, 2017.

  1. MILKMAN

    MILKMAN Newb

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Posts:
    41
    Likes Received:
    5
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Central Wisconsin
    Im hoping to plant a plot of soybeans this year, and debating between getting soybeans from some farmers I help, or buying the eagle seed forage soybeans. Any one have experience with the forage soybeans?
     
  2. CoveyMaster

    CoveyMaster Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2013
    Posts:
    9,879
    Likes Received:
    3,044
    Dislikes Received:
    18
    Location:
    MO/KS state line
    Try some of both and compare the two for yourself. The Eagle beans are usually a mix of some different types of beans. I'm going to try some Black Larado soybeans this year as well. They have a percentage of hard seed and are capable of reseeding themselves.
     
  3. MILKMAN

    MILKMAN Newb

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Posts:
    41
    Likes Received:
    5
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Central Wisconsin
    I was debating on trying those too, but I had heard alot of talk on the eagles so i was leaning more towards those.
     
  4. elkguide

    elkguide Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2012
    Posts:
    5,651
    Likes Received:
    4,238
    Dislikes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Vermont
    While the deer are going to be used to eating whatever brand the farmers have planted, it's usually good to have something else that they might like that's a little bit different.

    I try and plant my food plots, if they are the same type, (ie: beans or corn or clover/alfalfa) a little bit later so that my crops are coming on just a little bit later to keep the deer moving in to them as the farmer's fields are matured and being cut.
     
  5. foodplot19

    foodplot19 Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2014
    Posts:
    8,449
    Likes Received:
    9,352
    Dislikes Received:
    5
    Location:
    West Central Missouri
    I've used Real World Wildlife for a few years. Last year we disked them under in April. We ended up having an outstanding crop in the food plot by doing this.

    Covey is sharp on all this type of stuff. Lots of times I just set back and watch what he has to say.
     
  6. Lester

    Lester Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    Posts:
    8,212
    Likes Received:
    2,030
    Dislikes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Buffalo Minnesota
    Try getting some soybeans for southern Iowa or northern Missouri and plant them a little later than what the farmers usually do around you in Wisconsin. They will have a different amount of maturity days. You will get more forage than the beans for your zone and also get the benefit of the pods you wouldn't have with the eagle beans.
     
  7. Bigtine

    Bigtine Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2015
    Posts:
    193
    Likes Received:
    10
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    I would recommend any roundup ready soybean you can get the cheapest. You'll get a lot more yield if the fields are weed free.

    I can't believe people can till bean plots back in, must be pretty big. Ours never have any seed left and are completely demolished by spring.
     
  8. MILKMAN

    MILKMAN Newb

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Posts:
    41
    Likes Received:
    5
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Central Wisconsin
    Ya i guess im going more for a winter food source w/ them... so i may just go with some ag beans and keep the deer out as long as i can, and then broadcast turnips into them. Prob gonna have Iron clay cowpeas and buckwheat and a small clover plot for early season food source.
     
  9. Lester

    Lester Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    Posts:
    8,212
    Likes Received:
    2,030
    Dislikes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Buffalo Minnesota
    How big is the plot you are planning on planting the soybeans?
     
  10. MILKMAN

    MILKMAN Newb

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Posts:
    41
    Likes Received:
    5
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Central Wisconsin
    maybe .75 of an acre... I had really good success keeping deer out of ICP's w/ milorganite this past yr. So im hoping periodic applications possibly paired w/ fencing will keep them out. Worst case scenario is just till them under if over browsed and plant turnips/rape.
     
  11. Lester

    Lester Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    Posts:
    8,212
    Likes Received:
    2,030
    Dislikes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Buffalo Minnesota
    At less than 2 acres of beans if you have a decent sized deer herd you are going to have to keep them out or you are mostly wasting your time. They will mow it down before it ever really gets going.
     
  12. elkguide

    elkguide Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2012
    Posts:
    5,651
    Likes Received:
    4,238
    Dislikes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Vermont

    Absolutely correct UNLESS the farms around are planting the same crops.
     
  13. MILKMAN

    MILKMAN Newb

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Posts:
    41
    Likes Received:
    5
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Central Wisconsin
    yup, thats why im planning on fencing it and using milorganite. And not that many deer around us, but if they do browse it ill just plant turnips/rape. Last yr my ICPs got to about 3', then once i stopped the milorganite then they mowed it. W/ the fence and milorganite im hoping to get it to take off, and if it makes it to winter great, if not o well
     
  14. Xoutdoors

    Xoutdoors Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    Posts:
    577
    Likes Received:
    18
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    MINNESOTA
    If you already got a nice size tractor like a farmall m. As long as you got a disc harrow and a 2 bottom plow w a seed drill. I'd get eagle seeds or evolve soybeans. But there's so much maintenance involve with soybeans. A lot of weed and grass killing by spraying. Just to save time. Id let a farmer lease it to farm just so you can buy 30yds long and 15yds wide of standing beans. They sell by the bushel
     
  15. Lester

    Lester Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    Posts:
    8,212
    Likes Received:
    2,030
    Dislikes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Buffalo Minnesota
    No farmer is going to lease .75 acres to plant beans!
     
  16. foodplot19

    foodplot19 Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2014
    Posts:
    8,449
    Likes Received:
    9,352
    Dislikes Received:
    5
    Location:
    West Central Missouri
    It was because of the "lack" of winter. Deer had plenty of food choices. We've had the same issue this year.
     

Share This Page