Drawing Bow Using a Thumb Release

Discussion in 'Bowhunting Talk' started by Justin, Apr 5, 2013.

  1. Justin

    Justin Administrator

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    So I decided to give the thumb release a try and see if I like it any better than the standard wrist-strap style release I've been using my entire life. Ultimately I'd like to get rid of the issues I have with clunking my release into my sticks/stands when I climb, having to take it on/off as I add or remove layers of clothing, and recently clunking it into my camera/camera arm while self filming. So I picked up a new Tru-Fire Edge 4 finger release and gave it a a whirl last night.

    First impressions - this is going to take some getting used to! Definitely a much different feeling both during the draw as well as at full draw. I'm not sure if I like it better or not, but I'm going to give it a while before I pass my final judgement.

    In any case, one thing I struggled with a bit is where to hold/position my thumb while drawing. My natural tendency is to put it over the trigger and rest is on the side of the release. However that can cause some premature shot discharge if you accidentally move your thumb or put pressure on the trigger while drawing. Not good. So I stared putting my thumb behind the trigger itself, much like I would do while drawing my wrist-strap release. Definitely safer, but it doesn't feel comfortable or natural.

    So for those of you shooting thumb-trigger releases - what do you do?
     
  2. Matt

    Matt Grizzled Veteran

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    I was trying the same release. Hijack question, how do you feel about the trigger travel? Does it seem like a lot to you?

    Answering your question, I made a fist to draw then move my thumb over trigger as I anchor.
     
  3. coheley665

    coheley665 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I just switched to the true fire hardcore 4 finger also it definitely is a change but im starting to get use to it.i switched for pretty much all the same reasons plus i want to be able to wear a glove on both hands. You are right about the drawing part when i first shootingwith this release i had one go off when i was about 1/4 drawed back thankfully nothing happened. After that though i started just started resting my thumb under the trigger
     
  4. muzzyman88

    muzzyman88 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    First things first, set that trigger HEAVY. This will take some of the pressure off of accidentally firing the release if you do "bump" it during the draw.

    I went down this path a couple years ago and I just didn't trust myself with it. I bought a Carter Chocolate Addiction. The release was awesome, just not for me for a hunting release. My biggest issue was shooting heavy poundage with it (over 55lbs), which, I believe everyone for the most part is shooting 60lbs +. For practicing, it was fine and in fact, I found it to be very accurate once I got used to it. However, I noticed once it started to get colder out, shooting it with gloves, and cold, stiff fingers wasn't fun for me at all. I always worried about it slipping during the draw or at full draw. The other deal breaker was holding at full draw for a while. I just couldn't see me holding for a long time while waiting for the deer to step into a lane if he hangs up.

    I know plenty who swear by them and do well. Just not me. I do like the benefit of hooking it on your loop and you're ready to rock, freeing up your hands. But I didn't like the feeling of those releases with gloves.

    I still have the Carter and shoot it once in a while to work on back tension, etc. But I won't hunt with it.
     
  5. tfox

    tfox Grizzled Veteran

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    Premature shot discharge can be a very bad thing:what:

    sent from my samsung note 2
     
  6. Gummi Bear

    Gummi Bear Weekend Warrior

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    I draw with my thumb behind the trigger, and it stays there until I have found my anchor and then I move my thumb around.

    I see a lot of folks trying to activate the trigger with their thumb, which seems like what you should do. However, a properly fit and adjusted release should activate by the meat at the base of your thumb.






    If you'll notice, it seems like there is little to no movement in her thumb to activate the trigger. This lady has good form, and her anchor is very similar to mine.

    Watch her hand, she activates the thumb release like a back tension, where her little finger is pretty much what sets it off as she flexes her back.


    As for shooting with gloves on: I absolutely cannot do it. I can kind of deal with a glove on my bow hand, but not on my release hand. I keep my release on the string, and for the minute or so I'm at full draw waiting for an animal to present a shot, I can deal with the elements.

    If it's too cold to deal, I just won't be out there. Call me a sissy, but I'll get out the rifle and sit in a heated box blind if it's that dang cold. :lmao:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 15, 2017
  7. rknierim

    rknierim Die Hard Bowhunter

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    It took some adjusting for me when I started using mine, too. Now I can't imagine using anything else. I just curl my thumb in like I'm going to pop it. Thumb is behind release until I'm anchored. It took about a week to really start to get comfortable with it, but it was well worth the effort. You will really like being able to let it hang from your D-loop when filming. No more banging around :)
     
  8. SwampDonkey

    SwampDonkey Weekend Warrior

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    I wrap my thumb around the release behind the trigger. Basically making a fist when I draw leaving little chance of a premature shot. Then I move my thumb in place as I hit my anchor. I switched over to a thumb release for the same reasons as you and I also thought it felt awkward at first. After a few times shooting with it I started to get used to it and now I couldn't see myself switching back. So nice in the stand being able to clip your release onto you bow, put your bow on your hanger, and not have to worry about it when a deer comes by.
     
  9. Justin

    Justin Administrator

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    Well - sounds like I just have to get used to holding my finger behind the trigger when I draw. :D

    I shot about 20 or so arrows through it last night and noticed that the brunt of the force while drawing was on my index finder. Anyone else notice that? I thought it would be more spread out across all of my fingers.

    The trigger travel doesn't seem to be to excessive, but there's some definite play in the trigger when there's a load on it. Meaning the trigger itself has a little "wiggle" before it really catches and requires force to set it off. I plan on playing with the adjustments a little more over the weekend to really get it where it feels comfortable for me. I also took off the rope sling and temporarily removed the metail retainer that allows it to hang on your string loop. I found it to be more of a bother when shooting a lot. Once hunting season comes and I want to lock it on my loop, I'll put it back on.
     
  10. MGH_PA

    MGH_PA Moderator

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    I've been shooting a Truball ST-3 for years now, and I would never go back. That particular release has very little creep in the trigger, and it can be pretty sensitive (although I usually adjust the positioning of the barrel before I adjust the spring tension). I always draw with my thumb behind the trigger, then as I settle in I slowly bring my thumb around. It's second nature to me now.

    I will second what Gummi Bear mentioned and that is, you want to be activating the trigger with the base of the thumb if you're truly using back tension. With that being said, a few deer I've shot in the field, I know I was half squeezing/half punching :D
     
  11. tfox

    tfox Grizzled Veteran

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    One issue with the hand held releases is to get one with a good trigger, you have to spend a good amount of cash. I've yet to see a good trigger on a cheaper handheld.

    sent from my samsung note 2
     
  12. maxpetros

    maxpetros Grizzled Veteran

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    I just got a spot hogg Friday night delight. Very nice trigger, crisp and no travel. It was pretty uncomfortable at first. But I quickly got used to it. I set my trigger HEAVY and I shoot it by just resting my thumb on the barrel and rotating my hand and squeezing my back ( light a back tension release) and it is a good surprise release. I like it very much and it helps with punching the trigger. Will post pics tonight.
     
  13. muzzyman88

    muzzyman88 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    The force you're feeling is most likely by design. If you've ever shot a hinge style release (back tension), they are meant to be drawn with most of the force on index and middle fingers to prevent you from rotating the release and having it fire during the draw. Its the nature of having the jaw or hook of the release between your index and middle finger. Now with a trigger, you can put as much hand into as you want, its not going to go off.
     
  14. tfox

    tfox Grizzled Veteran

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    When putting the thumb behind the trigger, on some style releases, it is possible to fire the release through the back of the trigger. The part that goes into the handle. My older chappy boss can be fired easily like this.

    sent from my samsung note 2
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2013
  15. maxpetros

    maxpetros Grizzled Veteran

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    Here is mine, it's a spot hogg Friday night delight. It has a nice crisp trigger and no travel. Highly recommend it. And it was only 100$ on amazon. ImageUploadedByTapatalk1365200625.845885.jpg

    And then I built this. It is a PVC tube with a handle and surgical tubing as the band and d loop rope for my release. I use it to help with my form as well as exercise. I also used it to get used to my thumb release ImageUploadedByTapatalk1365200933.865195.jpg
     

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  16. Aaron

    Aaron Grizzled Veteran

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    This is an video I filmed myself shooting a thumb release from a couple of years ago... I'm not sure if you can tell exactly how I go through my routine... but I kind of Wrap my thumb around the post, slowing adding pressure while pulling through the shot until it fires.

    Kind of funny watching this video... my form has changed so much since this video... but you get the idea.

    [video=youtube_share;h-ln9HBlTro]http://youtu.be/h-ln9HBlTro[/video]
     
  17. AntlerAddict

    AntlerAddict BHOD Crew

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    I tried a thumb release a couple years back, for the same reasons your trying one. I ultimately went back to a wrist release, since I just couldn't get used to it. Good luck with it!
     
  18. GregH

    GregH Grizzled Veteran

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    Justin, I don't know what you're looking for, but I have yet to use a thumb release for hunting. For the 8 plus years that I shot competitively I always shot a thumb release or a 2 - finger Stan. The thumb release gives me a more perfect anchor point but in hunting there's more risk drawing in certain situations.

    Funny thing is, is that I can shoot a wrist strap caliper release accurately with back tension but I still hunt with my okd Wynns Freeflight bowling glove release. Stems back to the day I was shooting 84 pounds. I can out score the Wynns with my Carter fat boy or my 2 - finger stan on the range every time. However, with the Wynns I can draw back worry free 100 % of the time in any situation and still get 'er done. The choice is yours.
     
  19. tfox

    tfox Grizzled Veteran

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    I agree with Greg. I did use my carter fits me too this year because my son somehow confiscated my tru ball short and sweet. That left me with the hand held because I have loaned my others out. I love that release but I just don't care for it in a hunting situation. I never could get comfortable with it just hanging there 25' up in a tree.

    sent from my samsung note 2
     
  20. nsimmons

    nsimmons Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I just bought a tru ball max 4 release and have been using it for a couple of weeks now. I had never used a thumb release before having shot wrist releases for the 12 years I have shot bow. I did not like it in my first impressions because I had to find a new comfortable anchor point and adjust the trigger tension to my liking. While adjusting the trigger lighter and heavier I punched myself in the mouth one time drawing it back haha, only got 1/4 the way back and it went off because it was too light. I have now found a good tension where I like it at. The trigger itself is very nice and doesn't have much travel. When I am drawing back I keep my thumb on the opposite side of the trigger next to my pointer finger. It definitely took some getting used to but now having shot it for a couple of weeks I really like it and don't plan on ever going back to a wrist release. I may have different impressions when I am actually hunting with it though so only time will tell.

    For those that wear gloves, I have no idea how you can shoot with gloves on. I have never been able to get comfortable shooting with gloves on. When I hunt I never where gloves only when walking in and walking out, but even then most of the time I don't. I wear a muff or a roo, whatever you want to call it. It keeps my hands very warm and I keep them in there right up until I need to hold my bow. I would recommend one to anybody who does not like wearing gloves to get one.
     

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