Drawing bow on stand

Discussion in 'Bowhunting Talk' started by kurveball18, Oct 31, 2016.

  1. kurveball18

    kurveball18 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    hey guys, looking for a little advice. When I'm on the ground shooting I can draw my bow just fine but when I'm up 15 feet in a tree on my hang on stand I tend to struggle drawing back. I know it has to do with heights but is there any tips you guys can give me that might help? I can get it drawn back but its not the easiest thing.
     
  2. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

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    Lower the pounds. Seriously though, if it is a comfortable thing then there are no tricks other than practicing it and making it happen. If you have to lower the pounds, no shame in it. I lowered from 70 down to around 63 last year and 65 this year...such a better shot now and can hold at full much longer.
     
  3. Holt

    Holt Grizzled Veteran

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    Do all your practice shots from the same stand at home. It can be attached to tree right at ground level to make easy to shoot alot of shots out of it and will be easy to get into it. After awhile you will get your sea legs and feel comfortable shooting from the stand.
     
  4. Sota

    Sota Legendary Woodsman

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    Don't draw your bow above waist height, you can hold your draw a lot longer too if you hold low as you draw.
     
  5. kurveball18

    kurveball18 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I think you described kinda what I'm dealing with. "Sea legs" I feel un-easy just because I'm up in the air. When I go up to our cabin to hunt for the weekend I'm going to put it on a tree at like 5 feet and do some practice. I'm definitely going to do more practice from a tree.

    What are your thoughts on closing your eyes when you draw and then opening once at full draw? I'm thinking its all mental like you mentioned so I was thinking on trying that to try and take the "up in a tree" aspect out of it.
     
  6. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

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    If it is "sea legs" or that kind...closing eyes can make it worse for folks...I'd test it out though when practicing and do it if it helps.
     
  7. Holt

    Holt Grizzled Veteran

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    What Ty said, I wouldn't close my eyes. You can set the stand at a couple feet off the ground and put on your harness on. Take crazy shots in every direction and crazy angles. Just keep moving Your target when you get down. Push your limits on the stand by leaning out to far. Keep going til you feel really comfortable shooting. The most important thing to remember for your mind is that your harness will protect you if you fall off. That's the hardest thing to get over.
     
  8. Holt

    Holt Grizzled Veteran

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    What Ty said, I wouldn't close my eyes. You can set the stand at a couple feet off the ground and put on your harness on. Take crazy shots in every direction and crazy angles. Just keep moving target when you get down. Push your limits on the stand by leaning out to far. Keep going til you feel really comfortable shooting. The most important thing to remember for your mind is that your harness will protect you if you fall off. That's the hardest thing to get over.
     
  9. foodplot19

    foodplot19 Grizzled Veteran

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    Does it help to set down? Are you wearing a harness? Just questions.
    I know when climbing poles as an apprentice I was way more scared than I am now. If you are able to think about what you are doing more than where you are at it'll help out.
    The reason I ask about the harness, trusting you equipment is a big part of being off of the ground and being comfortable.
     
  10. kurveball18

    kurveball18 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Yes, I always wear my HSS Ultralilte harness and use a linemens belt. I definitely struggle with heights to an extent. When using my hang on stand I always try to find a group of trees to get into for not only cover, but I find that it makes me feel more comfortable having another tree in front or side of me versus being a lone tree.

    The tree that I'm going to be hunting a lot in the next 2 weeks is a lone tree but its basically 1 of only a couple trees I can actually get in that puts me somewhat close to where I need to be.

    Another question that might help. When I have the harness strap on the tree. Should the strap be up higher on the tree so when I'm sitting it just pulls it snug? or should the strap be lower so when I stand up the strap is dangling downward. I'm wondering if I put the strap up high so I can feel it almost hold me when I stand. Kind like having the feeling of someone holding me.
     
  11. foodplot19

    foodplot19 Grizzled Veteran

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    I know you know this but the whole problem is mental. It is better to have the strap around the tree above your head. This keeps the chance of the strap ending up around your neck to a minimum. Keeping the strap btw you and the tree tight is a personal opinion. I'm sure there is a "rule" that talks about this. I personally have mine with a little slack in it. When I first started climbing I was uneasy at best. If you can have the your strap a little loose so that when you stand up you have room to move. Try keeping your feet staggered and not side by side. It'll help with you balance as well.
    You can tell it is mental due to the fact that if you have more trees around you it gives you a sense of security. Also, if it isn't try "snugging" your harness up on how it fits you. The last thing you want is to fall then take a hit when your harness comes tight. Don't make it so tight that you can't move but it should not be loose on you either. Things that are loose have a tendency to come apart.
     
  12. remmett70

    remmett70 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Can you draw while sitting in the stand. Sitting can help you feel more secure. Also what type of stand. I've never had problems with height and I still am more comfortable in my cheap, heavy BigFoot XL, compared to my Lone Wolf because of the platform size. Some people are never able to get completely over the fear and changing stands might help faster.
     
  13. early in

    early in Grizzled Veteran

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    Absolutely. Your eyes are important for balance, especially at altitude! lol
     
  14. englum_06

    englum_06 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I have a practice stand in my back yard specifically for off season shooting. I usually start practicing from it a month or so before the season gets here. I find that my first few trips up to shoot out of it I tend to be a little shaky in the knees. After I sling arrows out of it for a while it goes away. It's just nerves. Your situation could be the same.


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  15. kurveball18

    kurveball18 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Yea I definitely agree with it being mental. I know my harness fits loose right now and I think that is due to the warm weather and its still set for when I had more layers on last season. I'm going to tighten it up some so it fits me more snug this weekend.
     
  16. kurveball18

    kurveball18 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Yea I can draw when sitting especially if the deer is to my left out of this spot. I think when it comes down to "go time" on a buck I need to tell myself in my head to "man up" and draw it back NOW! and just DO IT. And then also do some practice on stand.

    I've had times in the past when I drew on deer where I catch myself trying to draw too slow hoping the deer doesn't see me. I think that has hurt me in the past. The hang on stand I'm using right now is the new XOP Vanish XT. Its just like the Lone wolf assault I think.

    thanks guys for all the help, I'll get some practice in from stand at a low height and "man up" when that buck comes by.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2016
  17. early in

    early in Grizzled Veteran

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    The drawing on a deer is something that takes practice, because it's a timing thing. This can't be perfected until you have had numerous encounters. It's not about "manning up", it's about knowing when the time is right to draw undetected. You'll get it over time.

    Practicing a few feet off the ground would help you big time!
     
  18. foodplot19

    foodplot19 Grizzled Veteran

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    Let me know how/if that works out for you.
     
  19. jcz

    jcz Weekend Warrior

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    I'm no expert on heights but what I do is widening my stance as much as possible. Another possible suggestion would be try bending your knees a bit instead of standing straight up. Or this may sound silly but wrap the lineman rope around the back and tree so you can lean and feel like your held in place. Also the tree strap try to adjust the slack. These are just suggestions not sure if it'll help. Good luck to ya
     

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