Deer management works wonders

Discussion in 'Trail Cameras' started by MistaWondaBread, Sep 5, 2016.

  1. MistaWondaBread

    MistaWondaBread Weekend Warrior

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    Hey guys,
    I haven't been active as I used to, but I just finished up school, and finally got to go check all of my trail cameras. Let me say first that when I started with this property 5 years ago, I was lucky to find a single buck. We had a lot of does, but my first year I didn't get a picture of a buck, or see one the whole season. The second year I did end up shooting a nice buck, but he was never on our trail cameras or had been seen on the property before. We've spent a lot of time working with creating good deer cover, safe transition zones, good food plots, and shooting a lot of does.
    Now here we are 6 years into it, and things are looking great! While I know these aren't the biggest deer, this is in southern Georgia, and deer tend to be smaller, so I'm pretty happy with what we have this year!

    This guy is a monster! Cannot believe he's hanging out !
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    Momma and 2 kids. They made it through so far!
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    A bachelor group! First one we've seen on the property in 6 years!
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    Young buck!

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    Another great size deer!
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    A smaller bachelor group we got a picture of on the other side of the property!
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    I'm pretty happy with the results. We're tracking 7 different bucks right now that are staying on the property, we're pretty excited about that! Hard work pays off! I can't tell you how many hours I spent hand tilling food plots, or cutting down trails and maintaining the transition zones, but man, it was all worth it!
     
  2. Tmpky

    Tmpky Weekend Warrior

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    Well done! I finally talked my father into not shooting the first thing that steps out.. Management plays a great roll.
     
  3. elkguide

    elkguide Grizzled Veteran

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    Good results for sure.
     
  4. sethf11

    sethf11 Weekend Warrior

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    Awesome job. Great deer. Good luck.
     
  5. pastorjim08

    pastorjim08 Legendary Woodsman

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    Looks like your hard work is paying off.

    Blessings........Pastorjim
     
  6. Parkerg31

    Parkerg31 Weekend Warrior

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    I've recently gotten access to my girlfriends family property for this year. I've only been able to have trail cams out for a few weeks but have only seen does. I found one scrape and a lot more tracks than I've seen deer. Do y'all recommend taking those does this year to help with the population or leave them?
     
  7. MistaWondaBread

    MistaWondaBread Weekend Warrior

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    If the does are bedding down in that area, during the rut, there will be bucks. The first big deer I took on this property was a deer that came over from a neighbors property chasing a doe. That being said, we had a real problem with does. My first year I saw 23 walking across the field and bedding down in a thicket, This meant no real completion for the bucks, and some bucks with screwy genetics were getting to mate, and the rut as a whole sucked a lot. Does are good, but too many is bad. So I'd suggest getting a head count, try to find markers on them, or , if your state allows, during the off season throw out some bait and try to get a good headcount. Killing a doe doesn't mean you won't have bucks next year, that's an old way of thinking, getting a good balance is essential to a healthy herd.
     

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