Concerns about Quest Thrive setup

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by SatTech, Mar 23, 2019.

  1. SatTech

    SatTech Newb

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2019
    Posts:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    I’m new to the forum, and archery all together. After months of browsing bow manufacturers websites, and learning about compound bows in general I decided that a Quest Thrive was at the top of the list for my first bow. Luck would have it a local archery shop had 3 in stock all with 70 lb limbs. I happen to be a small guy about 5’ 6” 140 lbs. I was measured at 27” draw length, and as it turns out the shop had 1 Thrive with 27” draw modules adjusted down to a manageable for me 50 lb draw weight. I released 5-6 test shots into a foam target , and I was sold. I bought the bow, Black Gold 7 pin sight, and a Rip Cord drop away rest. After waiting a couple of days for accessory installation I took delivery. Fast forward a week later I picked up some arrows from the same shop, and questioned the manager/bow tech how 70 lb limbs can be adjusted to 50 lbs, and what negative effects can that create ? Also why does Quest have 3 limb options when 1 can cover 50-70 lbs? He told me that it has absolutely no negative effects or changes to the bow whatsoever besides slower speed due to decreased draw weight , which is obvious, and that manufacturers don’t always advertise their bow limbs true adjustment range. Quest does build some bows with 1 limb that covers 40-70 lbs, but the Thrive isn’t one of them. I did some research tonight that leads me to believe that my bow can’t perform to its full potential efficiency wise with this setup. I’m already handicapped with a short draw, and low poundage. Did I screw up buying this bow?
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2019
  2. wildernessninja

    wildernessninja Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2014
    Posts:
    267
    Likes Received:
    27
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    wisconsin
    How does the bow shot? Did the shop show you the draw wieght on there scale? Lots off people shoot with there bow backed off from max poundage. As you shoot more you’ll build strength and can increase your draw wieght.
     
  3. SouthDakotaHunter

    SouthDakotaHunter Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2008
    Posts:
    1,369
    Likes Received:
    28
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Midwest
    Bows always perform most efficiently at their maximum draw weight. So I normally recommend if you are planning to shoot 60#, then buy a buy with 60# limbs, wouldn't suggest buying a 70# and turn it down to 60# - especially for someone that wasn't going to ever shoot the higher weights. That being said, long as you are in the manufacturers range (for example not going under recommended minimum) you'll be fine. Sounds like it's your first bow, just go out and practice, have fun, work on getting a good consistent form, anchor point, etc - so that every shot you take will be as close to the same as possible....
     
  4. davidingle

    davidingle Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2014
    Posts:
    976
    Likes Received:
    143
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Iowa
    The bow manufacturer might not advertise what weight it is able to go down to but they advertise what weight it can safely go down to. It could be voiding the warranty to shoot it lower than advertised weight. I'm not familiar with the bow but there should be a sticker on the limb that shows its weight range
     
  5. MonkeyBrains

    MonkeyBrains Newb

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2019
    Posts:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Hey guys, new to the forum, but have been into archery my whole life. Honestly joined so I could respond to this thread...

    I know I’m a few weeks late to the discussion here, but I just picked up a Quest Thrive myself. For any of you guys familiar with the G5 Prime Rize bow, this is basically the same bow, but updated and sold under their Quest brand label. That said, it is a very well balanced and great shooting bow. Has a rock solid back wall to shoot from if you like that approach. The original post caught my attention because SatTech configured his pretty much the same as me — I chose a Black Gold 5-pin “Revenge” sight and a RipCord drop-away rest. Mine is the 70# draw version and I have it adjusted to 65# and that’s pretty normal. It’s probably because I’m getting old, but more than 65# draw strains my bow arm and causes my elbow to get sore. My draw length is 28” — also quite normal. With some bows and cam designs your draw length will have an impact on draw weight. Not on this bow, the cam-over point occurs before the minimum draw length. Shorter draw lengths will however impact how much let-off there is. At maximum draw of 31” and at maximum draw weight for your limb set, the Thrive has a 75% let-off. Turning out your limb adjustments to lower the weight and/or shortening the draw length will lower the let-off percentage.

    @SatTech —. As mentioned above, a bow usually performs best when at it’s maximum draw weight. Most bows have a range for nominal operation and within that range the only thing you usually give up is some arrow velocity. The Thrive uses cam modules to set the draw length and they have 50, 60 or 70 pound limb options. If you want your bow set at 50# draw and know that you will never adjust above that, your bow shop should have sold you the 50# draw version. That said, they probably didn’t have one in stock. A 60# draw version would also be fine too, from what I remember of the spec sheet. And the 60# bow would give you the option to increase weight as you shoot more and get more comfortable with it. Honestly, a lot of new archers start kinda low and ramp up draw weight once they develop those stabilizer muscles a bit. Knowing that you’re new to it and if you have an intention of shooting regularly, I would have pushed you toward the 60# version of the bow. Room to grow and all that. 70# now, that’s a different story. Possibly could be a bit much, but also may be just fine if you end up adjusting to 60#+ as you shoot more. Seems like you’re compromising too much to have it turned down by 20lbs. I would also wonder how many turns out on the adjustments that would be... You get about 10 full turns before it’s not safe to adjust out any more.

    At 70# draw, the Thrive is a fast bow at 348 feet/sec. And the 50 and 60 # versions are no slouch for velocity either. However, I don’t know what sort of velocity you would get out of a 70# Thrive turned down to 50#. There’s a lot more to a bow than just the draw weight and I think too many people focus on that number alone. ...Even guys working in a bow shop who should know better.
     

Share This Page