Canon hf g30 vs r600

Discussion in 'Videography & Photography' started by dfal, Nov 29, 2016.

  1. dfal

    dfal Newb

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2014
    Posts:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    I have been looking at both these cameras and I don't understand why the g30 is so much better than a cheaper camera like the hf r600. It has a lot of the same specs or sometimes worse ones. It says the g30 has less megapixels, lower zoom, and a 1.2 lux while the 600 has a 0.4 lux in low light mode. I know it has a lanc port but would you guys enlighten me on what I'm missing. Here is a comparison chart also, it doesn't show all the specs though Compare Canon HF-G30 vs Canon HF-G20 vs Canon HF-R600 vs Canon HF-R52

    Thanks
     
  2. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    Posts:
    11,440
    Likes Received:
    1,651
    Dislikes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Northern Indiana
    I am just stepping into the self filming stuff, but here's my .02

    The R600 does great for what it is, except in lower light situations the video it is capable of taking is great, but it lacks a few very important things when it comes to self filming a hunt: LANC capability and low light abilities.

    I personally plan to add a R600 or something similar for 2nd angle, recovery and other times I don't feel like lugging a bigger cam in with me....but that is down the road. They truly are solid little cameras and throw in an external mic hook up and really outside of LANC capabilities they'll produce quality footage so much as you do your part. Your zoom and panning might not be as fluid obviously due to no LANC but still good.

    I am gonna grab a G20 or G30 after the New Year personally because there is zero they cannot do really that the R600 can, but can do more.
     
  3. copperhead

    copperhead Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2014
    Posts:
    3,477
    Likes Received:
    696
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Apex, North Carolina
    It really depends on your use. What Ty highlights is spot on. The CMOS sensor in the R600 is smaller and the aperture is smaller which results in less light. The other disadvantage is the lack of a LANC connection.

    With that said if you are just getting started and not doing an full blown production stuff the R600 should be fine. Meaning if you are only uploading the video to YouTube the R600 should work great.

    I have a G30 and before that had the G20 and HF M500. The M500 has the same sensor as the G10 and works well in low light. It is missing the LANC but is a great starter camera if you can find one.
     
  4. Rick James

    Rick James Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    Posts:
    5,058
    Likes Received:
    816
    Dislikes Received:
    3
    Location:
    N. Illinois
    I'd really push someone towards the G30 if at all possible. I'm using one now, and have filmed two deer kills with it. I can say positively that the second one (droptine) wouldn't have been on film if I didn't have a lanc.

    Second thing is that even with the bigger sensor on the G30, I'm out of camera light probably 5-10 minutes before end of legal shooting light if I'm on a field edge, and even earlier if I'm in the timber. I don't have experience with other cameras, but I'd say even the G30 is causing me to miss some primetime footage. It's REALLY difficult to track and find an animal in the timber in those last minutes of light even with my setup now, just last weekend I had 5 does and a buck at less than 30 yards in the timber during the last 15 minutes of shooting light and I couldn't find them on the viewfinder to get footage.
     
  5. tynimiller

    tynimiller Legendary Woodsman

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    Posts:
    11,440
    Likes Received:
    1,651
    Dislikes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Northern Indiana
    Is there a setting you can adjust to pick up better light in those situations but sacrifice crisp or good image? Again newb to things like ISOs and such.
     
  6. DEC

    DEC Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2011
    Posts:
    642
    Likes Received:
    159
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Ashley, Indiana
    Like others have said really. Both are fine cameras, but the G30 is going to perform better in the deer woods. Whether it is enough better to justify the extra cost is really put to the buyer to decide. The G30 while having a smaller sensor, it holds a larger aperture over the entire zoom range. The R600 will zoom further, but the aperture closes down way further and much faster into the zoom. Zoomed in at an f/4.5 in the last 20 or minutes is going to produce an image that is pretty tough to use. During daylight hours though, the images should be very close to each other between the cameras. Also, I know it doesn't sound like much difference, but the G30 has a larger LCD screen. It can be tough locking in and tracking a deer on a small LCD. The G30 will be tough enough, but going down to the R600 will be brutal. That 1/2" makes a bigger difference than you would think.

    Unless you have used a Lan-C remote then you cannot really appreciate the value of that feature. I would never go back to a camera that I could not use a Lan-C to operate, I don't care what the cost savings would be.

    Other things to consider. The R600 does not have a shoe mount for an external microphone. You can hook a line in mic to it, but you have no way to mount a mic with out some crazy looking adaption. Further while the G30 doesn't give you 100% manual control over the camera, it lets you manually control more than the R600. There is a form factor as well. This is more of a personal preference, but you can get physically too small when it comes to a hunting camera. The G series is a pretty good balance between form and function.

    Personally, I run an XA-20, it is very similar to the inner workings of a G30. I've been running it since this line came out and it has been an outstanding hunting camera. If I am in the timber hunting, then yea that last 10 minutes gets rough. But beyond that it has been a great compromise for me when it comes to cost, form factor, and features. If you really want to manually control a camera and push the low light performance than you need to jump to the next category of cameras, like say an XF105. Sony has some great options as well.

    At the end of the day it all comes down to two things. 1) What are your final video product goals and 2) what is your budget. Neither camera is bad ... they are just different. There are tons of great options out there right now.
     
  7. haydo601

    haydo601 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2016
    Posts:
    77
    Likes Received:
    55
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lenawee County , MI
    Don't have experience with many others but I'm in love with my G30 and got a heck of a deal on it from canon direct. I purchased a refurbished one for $635 shipped to my door!
     
  8. copperhead

    copperhead Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2014
    Posts:
    3,477
    Likes Received:
    696
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Apex, North Carolina
  9. haydo601

    haydo601 Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2016
    Posts:
    77
    Likes Received:
    55
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lenawee County , MI
    Yes I used that link to set mine up when I first got too. Great information
     
Tags:

Share This Page