Canning venison

Discussion in 'Game Processing, Recipes & Cooking' started by oldnotdead, Jul 28, 2021.

  1. Bone Head Hunter

    Bone Head Hunter Grizzled Veteran

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    I think you will like it very much... Brings back memories of my mom seeing those full jars!

    You take those to camp this year and you will have fellers fighting for the last bite out of the jar..
     
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  2. GeminiRidge

    GeminiRidge Weekend Warrior

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    Love me some canned venison. My dad used to make it and I plan on starting it back up this year. I never remember it being too salty at all. I can't tell you how many jars we ate in college. We used to Mix with some BBQ sauce, put it on some toast and top with some cheap cheese for a delicious and mainly cheap meal. When we were feeling boujee we would put some horseradish on top.
     
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  3. Mod-it

    Mod-it Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I use a recipe for canning meat that I really enjoy, it is like a treat to me. This can be done to any cut of meat but it works extremely well for getting use out of hock and neck meat (tons on an elk) that most just toss. There is no need to clean up the meat real well because the cooking process dissolves everything but the meat. It is good as sandwich meat or simply on a Ritz cracker. The friend that taught me to do this says it is excellent in stroganoff.

    Cut meat into 1" cubes. No need to clean the meat up real well. Pack canning jars tightly to halfway up the top neck of the jar. Put in one to two tablespoons of Lipton's onion cup of soup mix.
    Cook in a pressure cooker at 12 lbs for 90 minutes. On my stove I have to watch the pressure like a hawk, I end up adjusting it a lot at first and still end up having to adjust it periodically throughout the cooking to maintain 12 lbs.
    Of course check that all cans have sealed after they've cooled.
    The cooking process has dissolved everything but the meat, the silver sinew, etc. will look a lot like rendered fat and will be sitting at the top. Simply scoop it out and toss. It doesn't effect the flavor of the meat at all like it does if you leave it on steaks and such.
    Very simple and taste is mild but surprisingly good. If I set a can of it out with some Ritz crackers when having a get together it goes quickly and I get asked how I made it and often am asked if I can spare a jar of it for them to take home.
    Funny to me, many people will immediately turn their nose up at the mention of canned meat. The first time I had a get together with it set out I removed it from the jar and just put on a plate with some Ritz crackers. It went quickly. I can almost guarantee if I had set it out still in the jar it would've been avoided. Plus it's fun when they ask you what that was and you then tell them it was venison canned meat.
     
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  4. oldnotdead

    oldnotdead Grizzled Veteran

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    So the stew is done.
    I did doe, , potatoes, carrots, green beans, corn, onion.
    I forgot the green peppers to my shifting. Everything from the garden except corn I bought a dozen ears.
    I sauteed them with garlic and divided juices between jars and added just a little water. I put a 1/2 tsp of bullion in each jar and two twists of pink salt.
    I have dialed in the pressure to where it stops at 14#'s and his perfect.
    So with the stews I will learn to add a bit more liquid. It was only up to just a bit under curve of neck. Man I was missing out on a lot over the years I love this. We have a restaurant supplier that sells to the public as well. I will be getting some chicken and canning up stews and soups....spring time Turkey legs .... Hhhmmmm I have some wood chucks that need thinning...squirrel too...he'd never know....hee,hee,hee.
    Though the water bath stuff is a tad less time consuming as far as watching it come up to temps.

    I'm on my second canner of the kraut I made back Sept. 17 & 19. I washed, opened and checked each jar ,washed rims and the lids then resealed and water bath canning....Oh Damn that's some great eats right there. After this last batch is out I'll pack up another two canners worth to go to basement for 6 wks.. cabbage is all prepared and jars in oven sterilizing to be packed.
    Glad the wind was funky today , getting so much out of the way.
     
  5. Mod-it

    Mod-it Die Hard Bowhunter

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    There is nothing better than homemade Kraut. So good.
     
  6. oldnotdead

    oldnotdead Grizzled Veteran

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    It is so good, I put up another canners worth in basement to can in 6 -8 weeks. Today I pick the Savoy for frozen stir fry cabbage. I make it cut it like kraut but freeze and we stir fry it with bacon in bacon grease and a bit of sweetener and home made mixed berry vinegar. Now that is delicious!
     
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