Breaking new ground

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by Wiscohunter, Jul 15, 2016.

  1. Wiscohunter

    Wiscohunter Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2013
    Posts:
    2,411
    Likes Received:
    1,688
    Dislikes Received:
    28
    Location:
    Sauk County, WI
    what is the best to use to break-up new ground for a plot? I have a small garden tractor and was thinking of buying a small used disc that I could pull behind that or a 4 wheeler. I just don't know if that would be enough. The disc im looking at is 3 feet wide and is the type you can put cinder blocks on for added weight. Thanks.
     
  2. Robson

    Robson Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Posts:
    114
    Likes Received:
    5
    Dislikes Received:
    1
    Location:
    NW IL
    I have a 42" KingKutter, which is the style you're referring to. To be honest, I'm not sure if a small garden tractor will do the job. Speed can definitely help. When I use mine on "new" ground I often have to turn tight, clockwise circles. When doing so the rear outside disc acts more like a moldboard or chisel plow and curls the soil/sod over. After turning overlapping circles from one end of the plot to the other I then drive over everything break up all the clumps. The plus side is once you have the ground worked up a couple seasons, it works pretty nice the following year. Especially if you plant something like turnips/beets that help loosen soil anyways.

    A pull behind tiller might be a better bet if you can swing a pull style tiller. I jump think a garden tractor isn't going to have the mustard.
     
  3. remmett70

    remmett70 Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2015
    Posts:
    2,422
    Likes Received:
    396
    Dislikes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Rothschild, WI
    When you find something that works. feel free to drive a few hours north and do mine also.
     
  4. Wiscohunter

    Wiscohunter Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2013
    Posts:
    2,411
    Likes Received:
    1,688
    Dislikes Received:
    28
    Location:
    Sauk County, WI
    Haha maybe if you split the cost of all the equipment with me I can do that.
     
  5. remmett70

    remmett70 Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2015
    Posts:
    2,422
    Likes Received:
    396
    Dislikes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Rothschild, WI
    I have Beer..........
     
  6. Jeepwillys

    Jeepwillys Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2015
    Posts:
    2,450
    Likes Received:
    269
    Dislikes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Central, KY
    They just covered on BHOD show a good way. Planting any form of tuber, i.e. Turnips, carrots, beets. Will work just as well as a chisel plow. We had this recommended to us for pasture ground that was pretty compact. It's not an over night fix but will work it up pretty good after a few seasons and adds a lot of humus to your soil. The same way it digs deep to break up ground it draws nutrients from deep down and puts it back on top. Good luck with what ever you do.
     
  7. foodplot19

    foodplot19 Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2014
    Posts:
    9,240
    Likes Received:
    11,408
    Dislikes Received:
    8
    Location:
    West Central Missouri
    Soybeans do the same thing as far as breaking up the soil, IMO they do a better job of breaking up the soil, at least with the soil we have here.
     
  8. buckybadger

    buckybadger Newb

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2016
    Posts:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North East Wisconsin
    If you have an ATV do yourself a favor and get the GROUNDHOG MAX. I got one and planted our plots here in wisconsin over the weekend of the 4th of July. Slick as can be and does an unbelievable job. Did 2 plots about 1/2 acre plus a micro plot (20x20) deep in the woods (disked / limed / planted / fertilized) in about 4 hours. It is really a superb product and you will not be disappointed!
     
  9. cj22drake

    cj22drake Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2015
    Posts:
    76
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    I definitely agree. I bought one a couple years ago and I love it. Picked mine up at tractor supply for about $350
     
  10. scoot12

    scoot12 Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2012
    Posts:
    1,065
    Likes Received:
    5
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Hunter, my property is real close to Sauk County where you are from. I also own a groundhog max and its a fine little disk if you are planting under an acre. Half acre or less is more ideal. It works great if your ground is hit good with roundup and everything is dead. Start so the disk just cuts the surface of the soil first. Then once its worked up a bit, lower groundhog max and really go at it. The faster u drive, the better it works. I also have used a spring tooth harrow and for $50 to $100 it works great if your plot has been disced up before. Farmers have these laying in their weeds alot and a great tool for food plotting.
     
  11. henson59

    henson59 Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2013
    Posts:
    2,568
    Likes Received:
    707
    Dislikes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Champaign Co IL/ Ohio Co IN
    How big of an area are you planning on working?
     
  12. Wiscohunter

    Wiscohunter Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2013
    Posts:
    2,411
    Likes Received:
    1,688
    Dislikes Received:
    28
    Location:
    Sauk County, WI
    1/4 acre only.
     
  13. remmett70

    remmett70 Die Hard Bowhunter

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2015
    Posts:
    2,422
    Likes Received:
    396
    Dislikes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Rothschild, WI
    I have a few small areas like that in the trees, with rocks and stumps. I am thinking about just picking up a Garden Weasel and see how it does. Not trying to turn over 6" deep, only break the surface.
     
  14. foodplot19

    foodplot19 Grizzled Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2014
    Posts:
    9,240
    Likes Received:
    11,408
    Dislikes Received:
    8
    Location:
    West Central Missouri
    We use to have the perfect disc for a four wheeler. It was made by Priefert. Has notched bladed front and rear and racks for weight. Worked pretty well.
     
  15. nutritionist

    nutritionist Weekend Warrior

    Joined:
    May 20, 2014
    Posts:
    265
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dislikes Received:
    1
    My answer is depending on where you live and your soil type. I have the amish custom build food plot discs for my clients that can pulled behind a 4 wheeler. The disc cut sod well. I like to use a springtooth as long as there isn't too many rocks as it helps rip into the sod and tears the rooted forages. Standard drag harrows can be fine for hard to get at areas and areas where rocks come into play.
     
  16. adkhunter1590

    adkhunter1590 Newb

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2016
    Posts:
    37
    Likes Received:
    10
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Careful with the groundhog max. I just bought one this spring and used it on my Kawasaki brute force 750 and unless you have a custom fab hitch reciever your gonna do frame damage. I tried the two strongest hitches I could find anywhere online and it bent the hell out of the first one and the second one caused frame damage. Luckily I stopped using it before it got any worse. Sent it back to the company. Idc how many passes I need to take with a pull behind disc...it's all I'll ever use from now on.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     

Share This Page