Biologic Hot Spot

Discussion in 'Food Plots & Habitat Improvement' started by jrk_indle84, Feb 23, 2014.

  1. jrk_indle84

    jrk_indle84 Grizzled Veteran

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    I've got a couple spots near stands I've been considering clearing out some and putting in a small kill plot. Was wondering if anybody has had any experience with the Hot Spot plot mix. The area is probably not the best soil and won't get a lot of sunlight and from what I've been reading is what this stuff is basically for.

    This will be first time messing around with plots so any info would be good.
     
  2. bluecollaroutdoors

    bluecollaroutdoors Weekend Warrior

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    Whats in the mix? Get a soil test for 10 bucks so you know what your working with.
     
  3. jrk_indle84

    jrk_indle84 Grizzled Veteran

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    Site says winter peas and buck wheat. I've also seen other places that clover or winter wheat would work well do.

    Idk this is just something wanting to experiment with to see if it works and is worth pursuing more.
     
  4. bluecollaroutdoors

    bluecollaroutdoors Weekend Warrior

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    Buck wheat would be good for poor soil. Not sure on the peas as I didnt have any luck with them in 5.5 ph soil but now that everything is around 6.5 to 7 they grow great for 3 weeks until the deer demolish them.
     
  5. greatwhitehunter3

    greatwhitehunter3 Grizzled Veteran

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    I planted it a few years ago and it grew great. Didn't do any soil prep (fert. lime) because I was in a crunch for time and was honestly just curious how it'd grow. Got at most 5 hours of not very good light because it was in the middle of a creek bottom. All I did for prep was rake the debris off the ground and spread the seed. I literally went as "lazy" as I could for that particular plot and was very pleased. Worth a shot in my opinion; not like it'll break the bank doing it if it doesn't meet your expectations.
     
  6. jrk_indle84

    jrk_indle84 Grizzled Veteran

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    Well sounds like need to do some prep work and get test see what I got. Figured that'd be first step but was hoping maybe get by.

    Basically this idea to try is coming from the past two years experiences hunting. Farm I hunt brings deer in and holds them until about the middle to end of November when all crops are out and worked under. So hoping to get something that deer will maybe hit later on in season.
     
  7. bluecollaroutdoors

    bluecollaroutdoors Weekend Warrior

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    If you want deer hitting your plots as late as possible I think your best bests are larger plots of soybeans and corn. If you have to work with anything under and acre brassicas would probably be your best best as they dont see to get harrassed alot until alte in the season and can provide a ton of forage. That being said I wouldnt try to plant any of that stuff on a first year plot until you get your soil worked up and get the nutrients right. You need something simple for year one and buckwheat would get a good option along with oats and winter rye. You can get that to grow gauranteed.
     
  8. jrk_indle84

    jrk_indle84 Grizzled Veteran

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    Yea its gonna be a trial and error thing this first year. Hoping maybe of I have some luck with this theres a small two or three acre field that may be able to talk my buddy into renting for a plot. The farm I hunt is owned by one lf my buddies and I can pretty much do whatever except plant plots. Its a grain and cattle farm so most open ground goes to that. Heres one of the areas I'm thinking about.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Its not really a very big area but plan is to clean it up some more and put it in that area. I went today and cut a few trees that could and cleaned up what I could with the ground being frozen.

    Thanks for all the help.
     
  9. jrk_indle84

    jrk_indle84 Grizzled Veteran

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    That was kinda my thoughts, figured if didn't work wouldn't be out a whole lot. I'd say th one area gets about that much sunlight throughout the day but after looking at the spot today it might get a little more. The canopy isn't has thick as first thought.
     
  10. bluecollaroutdoors

    bluecollaroutdoors Weekend Warrior

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    If you could just blow the leaves off of that area and rough up the surface in any way you could could grow clover and winter rye there no problem. Buckwheat would be a good choice as well but I am not familiar with the depth it needs to be planted. I think it needs to be buried a bit.
     
  11. greatwhitehunter3

    greatwhitehunter3 Grizzled Veteran

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    1/2"-1"
     
  12. jrk_indle84

    jrk_indle84 Grizzled Veteran

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    Yea I'm hoping to go in and clear off the leaves and rest of the little branches. Hopefully get everything cleared off and then put something down the prevent weeds and undergrowth then once that's knocked down is when I'll plant something.

    Still have to do some more reasearch and see when best time to actually plant would be.
     
  13. bluecollaroutdoors

    bluecollaroutdoors Weekend Warrior

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    Buckwheat - May
    Clover and Winter Rye - Late July
     
  14. jrk_indle84

    jrk_indle84 Grizzled Veteran

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    Well that solves that. Thanks for all the help guys. Appreciate it.
     
  15. bluecollaroutdoors

    bluecollaroutdoors Weekend Warrior

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    Or....plant clover in april may and just overseed with rye late july. Rye has a real nack for working with no tilling if u need to do it that way.
     
  16. jake_

    jake_ Die Hard Bowhunter

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    looks like a good spot. Thanks for the pictures and keep us updated along the way.
     
  17. jrk_indle84

    jrk_indle84 Grizzled Veteran

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    Definitely will, hoping its a success. Either way should be a good learning experience.
     
  18. jake_

    jake_ Die Hard Bowhunter

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    yep for sure. got nothing to lose! Plus once you see stuff growing and better yet deer eating on it, you will be hooked. :D
     
  19. jrk_indle84

    jrk_indle84 Grizzled Veteran

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    That's kinds what I'm afraid of. The past year or so of being on here has opened up a lot more addictions with hunting. You guys got to good of information to share ha.
     
  20. Loggyjens74

    Loggyjens74 Weekend Warrior

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    I agree.. buckwheat once ground is no longer frozen... rye/clover in july.. sometimes add in turnips to keep forage until later in the year.
     

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