Back Tension vs Wrist Release

Discussion in 'Bowhunting Talk' started by CToutdoorsman, May 22, 2016.

  1. CToutdoorsman

    CToutdoorsman Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I Have read that shooting a back tension release can be more accurate but harder to get used too. I shoot with my true fire edge and was wondering since I already shoot accurately with it, is the switch even worth the time and effort?
    Has anybody made the switch and if so what are your thoughts?
    Thanks, Paul B.
     
  2. pitzer25

    pitzer25 Weekend Warrior

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    I read the same thing that a back tension is more accurate. I tried to make the switch and it was alot harder than I thought. I also have 2 kids who were 2 and 6 months old last summer so I didn't give it the attention it probably needed. Long story short I stayed with my wrist release and am fine with it.
     
  3. indynotch50

    indynotch50 Grizzled Veteran

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    The back tension teaches you how to pull through your shot. What they do, is work to keep your form true no matter. You don't technically know when a back tension release will go off, so as you pull through your shot, your movement has to stay consistent.

    With a buckle release, people are prone to punching the trigger. They don't typically pull through, just touch off the release and then drop their arm. This is bad form.

    Don't get me wrong, I"m not saying you have bad form, I have no idea what your form is like, just trying to answer some questions.

    I've shot a back tension for a while (these are only to be used to practice). However, you can kind of do this with a finger release.
    Bill Winke has a quick show on it (I think it was him anyways). Basically you adjust your trigger to where you can loop your finger and thumb around the trigger. When you pull through the shot, your finger and thumb will trip the release.

    The back tension release is no more than a tool to work on form. If you do get one. Stand about a foot away from the target until you get consistent. I've heard of pros giving the advise to close your eyes when you shoot them, focus on nothing but the pull and release.
     
  4. BukFvr21

    BukFvr21 Die Hard Bowhunter

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    I switched last season to a hinge release exclusively for hunting and target shooting. I can say without a doubt that if has made me a better shot and I'm still learning. I have an issue or target panic and want to punch the trigger on my wrist strap release. My hinge release helps slow me down. You have to think of it this way though, think of it as this is an equipment change to make me better and stick to it. Don't get lazy with it and shoot it every once in awhile to mix things up. You have to commit to only using it. There is a reason the top guys in archery use a hinge and only a hand full of pro level archers use wrist straps to compete. If your worried about a hinge going off look for the Carter Honey and Honey 2 and the Carter Evolution, all have a saftey on them so you can draw and get anchored without worry of the release going off. Good luck.
     
  5. Afflicted

    Afflicted Grizzled Veteran

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    I bought the Carter Evolution and Simple 1 myself to make the switch from a wrist release myself. I'm good now at creating a surprise release with my wrist release but would like a handheld I can have clipped to my D loop for hunting. I find myself fumbling to get my wrist release clipped to my loop when suffering from buck fever.
     
  6. Marauder

    Marauder Die Hard Bowhunter

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    If you go to a back tension release, I'd google John Dudley. He seems to have his stuff down!
     
  7. theleo

    theleo Newb

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    I've been shooting a Honey 2 and like it a lot. Back tension releases do have a learning curve to them and make shooting in the wind a bit nerve racking, but they do make you really concentrate on your form.

    My two biggest recommendation are:
    #1) if you're not feeling it at the range, like you're shooting just isn't what it should be, pack it in and go home. The hinges are great for improving your consistency but will really become frustrating if you're not on top of your game when you're learning to shoot them.
    #2) If you have a beard of any length and get a hinge with a safety, make sure it's a safety you have to manually take off. I originally set my Honey 2 so the safety came off as soon as I took my thumb off the peg. It was fine and dandy till the first time I put my thumb back on the peg to engage the safety to let down. I now have a thin patch in my beard rite near where I anchor and my Honey 2 is set to where I manually push the safety off.
     
  8. Jeepwillys

    Jeepwillys Die Hard Bowhunter

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    Stan also offers safeties on their Hinge and Thumb releases.

    #2) If you have a beard of any length and get a hinge with a safety, make sure it's a safety you have to manually take off. I originally set my Honey 2 so the safety came off as soon as I took my thumb off the peg. It was fine and dandy till the first time I put my thumb back on the peg to engage the safety to let down. I now have a thin patch in my beard rite near where I anchor and my Honey 2 is set to where I manually push the safety off.

    LOL. You sound like my brother.
     
  9. theleo

    theleo Newb

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    Your brother must be a stud then!

    Stan has their trainer lock on their releases. The safeties on the Honeys make them act more like Stan's Evolution except they're a hinge instead of resistance activated. The trainer lock that Stan has on there's won't let you fire your bow at all if you have any tension on the release.
     

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